2

Note: I have written a "recipe" based on the lessons learnt from the exercise and the answers & comments on this page, see http://www.codeproject.com/Tips/1029941/Python-like-enumeration-in-Cplusplus.

I'm playing around with the extensions that C++11 brings to C++03. I want to be able to iterate over a container using the following code:

int main()
{
    std::list<int> list = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 };
    for (auto x : enumerated(list))
        cout << x.first << " " << x.second << endl;
    for (auto x : const_enumerated(list))
        cout << x.first << " " << x.second << endl;
}

The first iteration has x modifiable, vs for the second, attempting to modify x would lead to a compile error. I have something that works for the non-const case:

template <typename Container>
class EnumerationAdaptor
{
public:
    EnumerationAdaptor(Container& container) : container_(container) {}
    EnumIter<typename Container::iterator> begin() const { return container_.begin(); }
    EnumIter<typename Container::iterator> end() const { return container_.end(); }

private:
    Container& container_;
};

template <typename Container>
EnumerationAdaptor<Container> enumerated(Container& container) { return container; }

template <typename Container>
EnumerationAdaptor<const Container> const_enumerated(const Container& container) { return container; }

The non-const case uses EnumIter<std::list<...>::iterator>, as desired, and I'm trying to make the const case use EnumIter<std::list<...>::const_iterator> as return type of begin() and end(). Seems like I need decltype:

template <typename Container>
class EnumerationAdaptor
{
public:
    EnumerationAdaptor(Container& container) : container_(container) {}
    EnumIter<decltype(Container().begin())> begin() const { return container_.begin(); }
    EnumIter<decltype(Container().end())> end() const { return container_.end(); }  // *** compile error (see below)

private:
    Container& container_;
};

But I get a compilation error in Visual Studio 2015 Express:

Error   C2440   'return': cannot convert from 
'std::_List_const_iterator<std::_List_val<std::_List_simple_types<int>>>' 
to  
 'EnumIter<std::_List_iterator<std::_List_val<std::_List_simple_types<int>>>>'
[in c:\users\...\enumeratedcpp.cpp line 46, which is line marked ***]

which suggests that I'm doing something wrong with decltype, as the compiler is finding the non-const begin(). Is there a way to fix this?

EDIT: even with a simple EnumIter, problem is same:

template <typename Iter>
class EnumIter
{
public:
    EnumIter(Iter begin) : iter_(begin) {}

    EnumIter& operator++()
    {
        return *this;
    }

    bool operator!=(const EnumIter& rhs)
    {
        return iter_ != rhs.iter_; // or self.index_ != rhs.index_;
    }

    int operator*() const
    {
        return index_;
    }

private:
    Iter iter_;
    int index_ = 0;
};
  • 1
    this is probably easier solved with a separate ConstEnumerationAdaptor that calls cbegin and cend – sp2danny Sep 12 '15 at 22:40
  • 1
    otherwise, try replacing Container() (inside the decltype) with std::declval<Container&>() (from <utility>) – sp2danny Sep 12 '15 at 22:54
  • actually, I think the problem might lie in EnumIter<> – sp2danny Sep 12 '15 at 23:07
  • 1
    @Schollii You do need the & in declval because you're holding your container as an lvalue and you don't want to use the wrong type in case there's an rvalue-ref-qualified overload. – Barry Sep 13 '15 at 17:56
  • 1
    using iterator_type = std::conditional_t<std::is_const<Container>{}, typename Container::const_iterator, typename Container::iterator>. – T.C. Sep 13 '15 at 18:47
2

There is one issue with this expression:

decltype(Container().begin())

which is that Container() only works if Container happens to be default-constructible. That limits the usability of your class for no reason. (There is a lesser issue which is that this won't work for raw arrays, but that's another exercise).

Besides that, the code is perfectly valid for class types. From [expr.type.conv]:

The expression T(), where T is a simple-type-specifier or typename-specifier for a non-array complete object type or the (possibly cv-qualified) void type, creates a prvalue of the specified type [...]

So if Container is const list<int>, then the type of that whole expression should be list<int>::const_iterator. If MSVC gives you something else, that's a bug.

That said, we really should address the default-constructibility issue. That's where std::declval comes in:

decltype(std::declval<Container&>().begin())

This will not impose any restrictions on Container, and perhaps MSVC will handle this correctly.

  • "Second, the type of a constructor call is never cv-qualified. So decltype(T()), where valid, is the same as std::remove_cv_t<T>." [expr.type.conv]/p2 appears to suggest differently. And both GCC and Clang preserves the cv-qualification. – T.C. Sep 13 '15 at 18:26
  • @T.C. Yeah missed the non-class part the first time around. Hm. So why does OP's expression not work then? – Barry Sep 13 '15 at 18:34
  • MSVC bug, as far as I can tell. – T.C. Sep 13 '15 at 18:36
  • Insightful, thanks. Well if true I learnt something due to a bug in compiler :) BTW at least in VC++ 2015, the & is not required in declval, nor does it seem like it would be required from the docs for that function, nor is it used in the example on cppreference.com, yet both you and sp2danny used it, what is reason? – Oliver Sep 13 '15 at 19:13
  • @Schollii declval<T>() gives you an rvalue reference, declval<T&>() gives you an lvalue reference. If there's a begin() & and a begin() &&, the two could give you different types. – Barry Sep 13 '15 at 19:25

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