126

I would like to simply print a "hello world" to the python console after /button is called by the user.

This is my naive approach:

@app.route('/button/')
def button_clicked():
    print 'Hello world!'
    return redirect('/')

Background: I would like to execute other python commands from flask (not shell). "print" should be the easiest case. I believe I have not understood a basic twist here.

8
  • 1
    You're confusing two things here. You can call any functions you like from a handler; but the issue with print is what Flask is doing to stdout. Commented Sep 13, 2015 at 14:10
  • Hi @DanielRoseman and thanks for the comment! So flask is somewhat routing the print to http? What should I do to prevent this? Sorry if the question is silly :) Commented Sep 13, 2015 at 14:12
  • 3
    There are no silly questions :) Commented Sep 13, 2015 at 14:52
  • Flask does not route print to the response. If you are running the development server from a terminal session, you will see the output there. If you are running it through a WSGI server such as uWSGI, the output will appear in the logs instead.
    – dirn
    Commented Sep 13, 2015 at 14:54
  • How are you starting flask? Commented Sep 13, 2015 at 14:57

4 Answers 4

160

An easy way to do this is by printing to stderr. You can do that like this:

from __future__ import print_function # In python 2.7
import sys

@app.route('/button/')
def button_clicked():
    print('Hello world!', file=sys.stderr)
    return redirect('/')

Flask will display things printed to stderr in the console. For other ways of printing to stderr, see this stackoverflow post

6
  • 1
    Do I really need to go over all files and add from __future__ import print_function also file=sys.stderr for every print? is there a short way to it?
    – e271p314
    Commented Jul 14, 2017 at 20:13
  • I would recommend taking a look at the post I linked to in the original answer. There's one person recommends defining a function which always prints to stderr (you could put this in a util file that you already import). Another person recommends sys.stderr.write.
    – Gabe
    Commented Jul 15, 2017 at 21:41
  • You could also save a little bit of repetition with: from sys import stderr, file=stderr. In Python 3+, you don't need from __future__ import print_function, that is the default functionality.
    – johnthagen
    Commented Jan 13, 2019 at 15:32
  • If dumping an object this seems to work pprint(vars(myobject), sys.stderr)
    – jcroll
    Commented Mar 14, 2019 at 19:35
  • I'm using flask run to run the app from command prompt. I'm using pycharm as my IDE. In run configurations I have it set to emulate terminal in output console. When I try this, nothing prints in either the terminal or the python console. Any idea of what's not working? Commented Aug 19, 2021 at 19:33
40

We can also use logging to print data on the console.

Example:

import logging
from flask import Flask

app = Flask(__name__)

@app.route('/print')
def printMsg():
    app.logger.warning('testing warning log')
    app.logger.error('testing error log')
    app.logger.info('testing info log')
    return "Check your console"

if __name__ == '__main__':
    app.run(debug=True)
1
27

I think the core issue with Flask is that stdout gets buffered. I was able to print with print('Hi', flush=True). You can also disable buffering by setting the PYTHONUNBUFFERED environment variable (to any non-empty string).

5
  • 1
    This is the best way for print-debugging, especially in small projects Commented Apr 10, 2020 at 2:20
  • What is the value that should be set in the PYTHONUNBUFFERED env variable ?
    – thanos.a
    Commented Apr 11, 2020 at 13:34
  • 1
    @thanos.a You can set it to any non-empty string. I updated the answer.
    – Chris
    Commented Apr 13, 2020 at 19:20
  • You can add an example like PYTHONUNBUFFERED="anything_here"
    – thanos.a
    Commented Apr 13, 2020 at 21:40
  • Does anyone know why this is the case (that stoud gets buffered)? What's the benefit?
    – sleighty
    Commented May 9 at 19:55
4

I tried running @Viraj Wadate's code, but couldn't get the output from app.logger.info on the console.

To get INFO, WARNING, and ERROR messages in the console, the dictConfig object can be used to create logging configuration for all logs (source):

from logging.config import dictConfig
from flask import Flask


dictConfig({
    'version': 1,
    'formatters': {'default': {
        'format': '[%(asctime)s] %(levelname)s in %(module)s: %(message)s',
    }},
    'handlers': {'wsgi': {
        'class': 'logging.StreamHandler',
        'stream': 'ext://flask.logging.wsgi_errors_stream',
        'formatter': 'default'
    }},
    'root': {
        'level': 'INFO',
        'handlers': ['wsgi']
    }
})


app = Flask(__name__)

@app.route('/')
def index():
    return "Hello from Flask's test environment"

@app.route('/print')
def printMsg():
    app.logger.warning('testing warning log')
    app.logger.error('testing error log')
    app.logger.info('testing info log')
    return "Check your console"

if __name__ == '__main__':
    app.run(debug=True)

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.