23

I'm trying to parse CSS files in which variables can be injected that are defined in a config file. Currently the function does:

  1. Opens the file based on the given path argument
  2. Parses the file's content
  3. Executes the template by injecting the config variable
  4. Writes the rendered content to the console instead of the original file
func parse(path string) {
    f, err := ioutil.ReadFile(path)

    if err != nil {
        log.Print(err)
        return
    }

    // Parse requires a string
    t, err := template.New("css").Parse(string(f))

    if err != nil {
        log.Print(err)
        return
    }

    // A sample config
    config := map[string]string {
        "textColor": "#abcdef",
        "linkColorHover": "#ffaacc",
    }   

    // Execute needs some sort of io.Writer
    err = t.Execute(os.Stdout, config)  

    if err != nil {
        log.Print("Can't execute ", path)
    }
}

My problem is that template.Parse() requires the content as string and template.Execute() an io.Writer as argument. I tried to open the file with os.Open() which returns a file object that implements the io.Writer interface. But how can I get the file's content as a string from such a file object in order to use it with Parse()?

1
  • I try to extend a static side generator. Therefore I need to do this only once. Sep 13, 2015 at 17:14

2 Answers 2

53

Use ParseFiles to parse the template. This code basically does the same thing as calling ReadFile, template.New and Parse as in the question, but it's shorter.

t, err := template.ParseFiles(path)
if err != nil {
    log.Print(err)
    return
}

Use os.Create to open the output file.

f, err := os.Create(path)
if err != nil {
    log.Println("create file: ", err)
    return
}

A file is an io.Writer. You can execute the template directly to the open file:

err = t.Execute(f, config)
if err != nil {
    log.Print("execute: ", err)
    return
}

Close the file when done.

f.Close()

Complete working example on the playground.

5
  • I use os.Walk("root", filterFunc) and a filter to find all css files. if the script found one it calls parse() with the path. So, does it makes sense to call ParseFiles() if I need only to parse a single file? And lastly: os.Create(path) will overwrite the original file, right? Sep 13, 2015 at 17:44
  • 1
    For this scenario, you should call ParseFiles with a single file at a time. Caling ParseFiles with a single file saves code as noted in the answer. Yes, this overwrites the original file. If that's not what you are asking in the question, then please clarify. Sep 13, 2015 at 17:45
  • No, that's exactly what I needed. Thank you very much. Sep 13, 2015 at 17:47
  • Great, thanks @CeriseLimón I needed this too. Could you please explain what this is? Never seen this before map[string]string
    – user6198643
    Feb 21, 2018 at 10:42
  • 1
    @Sbe88 It's a map with string keys and string values. Feb 21, 2018 at 16:23
1

Here is a function I made with Cerise Limón's answer

func createFileUsingTemplate(t *template.Template, filename string, data interface{}) error {
    f, err := os.Create(filename)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }
    defer f.Close()

    err = t.Execute(f, data)
    if err != nil {
        return err
    }

    return nil
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.