6

I have a multilevel index pandas DataFrame where the first level is year and the second level is username. I only have one column which is already sorted in a descending manner. I want to show the first 2 rows of each index level 0.

What I have:

               count
year username                
2010 b         677
     a         505
     c         400
     d         300
 ...
2014 a         100
     b         80

What I want:

               count
year username                
2010 b         677
     a         505
2011 c         677
     d         505
2012 e         677
     f         505
2013 g         677
     i         505
2014 h         677
     j         505
  • If you call head(2) on your groupby it should give you the first 2 rows per group – EdChum Sep 13 '15 at 19:38
  • Why the labels ['h', 'j'] for 2014 in the expected output and not ['a', 'b']? – Alex Riley Sep 13 '15 at 19:56
5

Here is an answer. Maybe there is a better way to do that (with indexing ?), but I thing it works. The principle seems complex but is quite simple:

  • Index the DataFrame by year and username.
  • Group the DataFrame by year which is the first level (=0) of the index
  • Apply two operations on the sub DataFrame obtained by the groupby (one for each year)
    • sort the index by count in ascending order sort_index(by='count')-> the row with more counts will be at the tail of the DataFrame
    • Only keep the last top rows (2 in this case) by using the negative slicing notation ([-top:]). The tail method could also be used (tail(top)) to improve readability.
  • Dropping the unnecessary level created for year droplevel(0)

# Test data    
df = pd.DataFrame({'year': [2010, 2010, 2010, 2011,2011,2011, 2012, 2012, 2013, 2013, 2014, 2014],
                  'username': ['b','a','a','c','c','d','e','f','g','i','h','j'],
                  'count': [400, 505, 678, 677, 505, 505, 677, 505, 677, 505, 677, 505]})
df = df.set_index(['year','username'])

top = 2
df = df.groupby(level=0).apply(lambda df: df.sort_index(by='count')[-top:])
df.index = df.index.droplevel(0)
df

               count
year username       
2010 a           505
     a           678
2011 d           505
     c           677
2012 f           505
     e           677
2013 i           505
     g           677
2014 j           505
     h           677
| improve this answer | |
  • @David I have added some explanations, hope they help. – Romain Sep 15 '15 at 22:52
  • Ran into the same thing, your answer has been a huge help. Plusone to you and the question both. By the way, have you ever tried doing this via .xs()? I had a few goes at it and couldn't quite make it. – sparc_spread Sep 16 '15 at 18:36
  • 1
    @sparc_spread Thanks ! Glad to see, the answer has been useful to someone else. To answer to it, I've tried MultiIndex Slicers but not xs. I will try it. I thought a simple slice will do the job, but I failed ... – Romain Sep 16 '15 at 19:02
1

If you have a giant data frame you may not want to do a groupby just to get a glimpse of the data. Here is another solution for getting the first five rows of the outer index and the first two rows of the inner index.

df = pd.DataFrame({'year': [2010, 2010, 2010, 2011,2011,2011, 2012, 2012, 2013, 2013, 2014, 2014],
              'username': ['b','a','a','c','c','d','e','f','g','i','h','j'],
              'count': [400, 505, 678, 677, 505, 505, 677, 505, 677, 505, 677, 505]})
df = df.set_index(['year','username'])

Note that the DataFrame has to be sorted.

df = df.sort_index(level=[0,1])

df
                count
year    username    
2010    a       505
        a       678
        b       400
2011    c       677
        c       505
        d       505
2012    e       677
        f       505
2013    g       677
        i       505
2014    h       677
        j       505

Now for the magic:

def head_mi(df, n1=5, n2=2):

    #get top n of outer index
    top_lev_0 = df.index.levels[0].values[:n1] 

    #get top n of inner index
    top_lev_1 = [df.loc[ind].index.values[:n2] for ind in top_lev_0 ] 
    #top_lev_1 is a list of the inner index values

    #iterate over outer index and get slice from inner index
    acc = []
    for count0, ind0 in enumerate(top_lev_0):
        acc.append(df.loc[(top_lev_0[count0], slice(top_lev_1[count0][0], top_lev_1[count0][-1])),:]) 

    return pd.concat(acc)

head_mi(df)  

This gives:

                count
year    username    
2010    a       505
        a       678
2011    c       677
        c       505
2012    e       677
        f       505
2013    g       677
        i       505
2014    h       677
        j       505 
| improve this answer | |
1

I ran into the same problem and found a neater answer in the docs (pandas version 1.0.1): GroupBy: taking the first rows of each group. Here is the trick, assuming your dataframe is called df:

df.groupby(level=0).head(2)
| improve this answer | |
  • nice - not sure .groupby(level=...) was an option 4+ years ago. Agreed this works now – David Mar 22 at 14:48

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