I want to open a file using Python on Windows, perform some regex operations, optionally alter the content and then write the result back to a file.

I can create an example file which looks right (based on the comments on using binary mode in other posts on SO and within the documentation). What I can't see is how I convert the 'binary' data to a usable form without introducing '\r' characters.

An example:

import re

# Create an example file which represents the one I'm actually working on (a Jenkins config file if you're interested).
testFileName = 'testFile.txt'
with open(testFileName, 'wb') as output_file:
    output_file.write(b'this\nis\na\ntest')

# Try and read the file in as I would in the script I was trying to write.
content = ""
with open(testFileName, 'rb') as content_file:
    content = content_file.read()

# Do something to the content
exampleRegex = re.compile("a\\ntest")
content = exampleRegex.sub("a\\nworking\\ntest", content) # <-- Fails because it won't operate on 'binary data'

# Write the file back to disk and then realise, frustratingly that something in this process has introduced carriage returns onto every line.
outputFilename = 'output_'+testFileName
with open(outputFilename, 'wb') as output_file:
    output_file.write(content)
  • What do you mean by 'without introducing carriage returns'? They are already in the file. Am I correct in understanding that your requirement is to read the whole file as one continuous string(by getting rid of carriage returns) that you can run regular expressions on? So essentially your regular expressions can cross line boundaries and you don't want to factor that in your regular expressions, right? – Paani Sep 14 '15 at 14:42
  • I'm interpreting the question as "when I open a file without the 'b' flag, then sometimes '\n' characters get converted to '\r\n', which is undesirable. But when I open a file with the 'b' flag, I can't use re.sub. How can I use sub while preventing automatic newline conversion?" – Kevin Sep 14 '15 at 14:45
  • @Paani: If I open without the 'b' option, Python adds \r to each line. If I open with the binary option, I then can't do any string operations because they see it as binary data. – Jon Cage Sep 14 '15 at 14:47
  • Just a note - the failure behaviour above is for Python 3 only - I'd consider tagging this with python-3.x and mentioning Python 3 in the text. – J Richard Snape Sep 14 '15 at 15:07
up vote 2 down vote accepted

I presume you mean, your text file has return carriages and you don't want them included in the text.

If you use with open(fileName, 'r', encoding="utf-8", errors="ignore", newline="\r\n") as content_file

or more specifically, set newline="\r\n" in your open call, it should consume the return carriages on new lines.

Edit: Or if you want to operate only on \n then this working example should do it.

import re

testFileName = 'testFile.txt'
with open(testFileName, 'w', newline='\n') as output_file:
    output_file.write('this\nis\na\ntest')

content = ""
with open(testFileName, 'r', newline='\n') as content_file:
    content = content_file.read()

exampleRegex = re.compile("a\\ntest")
content = exampleRegex.sub("a\\nworking\\ntest", content)

outputFilename = 'output_'+testFileName
with open(outputFilename, 'w', newline='\n') as output_file:
    output_file.write(content)
  • No, the file just has '\n' line endings. The problem is that if I read / write without using the 'b' option Python adds '\r' to each line. – Jon Cage Sep 14 '15 at 14:49
  • If you explicitly state the newline used when you open the files, your problem will go away and I don't think you will need to use 'b'. – Alex Sep 14 '15 at 14:54
  • 1
    @JonCage What if you specify newline="\n" for the output file? – Kevin Sep 14 '15 at 14:55
  • Looks like you're right. In fact, it looks like you just need to add it on the output if the file you're reading in a file without carriage returns in it. – Jon Cage Sep 14 '15 at 14:55
  • Just adding \r\n as the newline on the input file isn't enough. – Jon Cage Sep 14 '15 at 14:57

If I interpreted the question correctly, I first decoded the bytes to string, then did the regex sub. Next, I encoded the string into bytes to be written into the output file.

import re

testFileName = 'testFile.txt'
with open(testFileName, 'wb') as output_file:
    output_file.write(b'this\nis\na\ntest')

content = ""
with open(testFileName, 'rb') as content_file:
    content = content_file.read().decode('utf-8')

exampleRegex = re.compile("a\\ntest")
content = exampleRegex.sub("a\\nworking\\ntest", content)

outputFilename = 'output_'+testFileName
with open(outputFilename, 'wb') as output_file:
    output_file.write(content.encode('utf-8'))
  • Whilst this does work, specifying '\n' on the output requires less code. – Jon Cage Sep 14 '15 at 15:30

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