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Hey i would like faster way for looking number around, let me explain:

int[] num = { 55, 155};

if (funcNum == num[0],funcNum == num[0]+1,funcNum == num[0]+2,funcNum == num[0]+3,funcNum == num[1]-1,funcNum == num[1]-2,funcNum == num[1]-3)

// dostuff

so basically i would like fast method to know if someNumber is equal to num(+x to -x) like num is 55 and i want to know if its equal to numbers from 40 to 70 counting 55 too

thanks!

  • What if funcNum == num[1]? Or funcNum == num[1] + 1? – Dmitry Bychenko Sep 14 '15 at 14:36
  • 4
    Will Math.Abs(funcNum - num[0]) <= x do the job? – Sebastian Schumann Sep 14 '15 at 14:37
  • if (a>40 && a <70) ? – rbm Sep 14 '15 at 14:37
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    if (A && B) is pretty fast - it's just comparing numbers, computer is pretty good at it. No need to call another function that'd take some more CPU cycles... – rbm Sep 14 '15 at 14:40
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    Please revise your question to indicate you want a "cleaner" or "more readable" method or writing this then. "faster" would indicate that you want it to execute faster. – crush Sep 14 '15 at 14:46
5
0

You could use something like:

int range = 5; // your range here
if ((funcNum <= num[0] + range) && (funcNum >= num[0] - range)) {
    // do something
}

If you wanted to test with all numbers in your array, you could do:

int range = 5; // your range here
bool inRange = true;
if (!num.Any(i => funcNum <= i + range && funcNum >= i - range))
{
    inRange = false;
}    

if (inRange)
{
    // do something
}

(here's hoping that I've understood your question correctly)

EDIT: Modified so that inRange is true when funcNum is in any of the ranges, not all of them.

| improve this answer | |
  • The test for num[1] is missing. Maybe there are some more values than two in num. – Sebastian Schumann Sep 14 '15 at 14:45
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    That second part can be simplified by using Any. if(num.Any(i => funcNum <= i + range && funcNum >= i - range)). Right now you answer is more of an All where it's still true if num is empty, which isn't likely to be what the OP wants. – juharr Sep 14 '15 at 14:57
  • Oh, my mistake - I assumed that funcNum had to be in the range of all of the numbers in the array. Thanks! – helencrump Sep 14 '15 at 15:03
1
0

Assuming ranges don't overlap (some methods below can tolerate multiple ranges like dictionary approach can have lists of ranges for each number)

  • If you have small range of possible numbers that you can simply trade memory for speed and have map of all numbers to particular range - O(1):

    {3, 9} with tolerance 1 (so expecting 2,3,4 to map to 3, and 8,9,10 to 9)

     var map = new Dictionary<int,int> ({2,3}, {3,3},{4,3}, {8,9}, {9,9, 10,9}};
     if (map.ContainsKey(funcNum)) ....
    

Note that if you don't need to know exact range some sort of bitmap/HasSet can be used to decrease memory requirements.

  • If there are a lot of numbers - sort the list and find possible range with binary search (O(log number_of_ranges)).

  • If number of ranges is small (measure, but I guess 3-5 would be the target) than regular loop and check if number is next to current (as shown in other answer) should work fine (O(number_of_ranges)).

| improve this answer | |
1
0

I believe this is what you are asking?:

if (( someNumber <= num[0] + x ) && ( someNumber >= num[0] - x)){
    //someNumber is within range
}
else{
    //someNumber is not within range
}

Check out equality signs like >, <, >= and <=, it will help you perform your checks faster.

If your num[0] is 55, your x is 15, that means num[0]+x is 70, and num[0]-x is 40, and if someNumber is less than or equal to 70, and (&&) someNumber is greater than or equal to 40, then the check returns true.

| improve this answer | |
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    This condition true for all x >= 0. There is no test for another value. I think the condition should be funcNum <= num[0] + x && funcNum >= num[0] - x – Sebastian Schumann Sep 14 '15 at 14:48
  • Yes Vera rind thanks for helping me see what the question is asking. – hiew1 Sep 14 '15 at 14:50
  • There's another problem: This condition doesn't test for num[1]. The sample code does (only in negative direction - maybe a mistake). – Sebastian Schumann Sep 14 '15 at 14:52
0
0

As per my comments above: if (a>40 && a<70) is the fastest (and cleanest from code point of view).

It is a simple operation which does not require a call to another function (i.e. you'd not be using more CPU cycles).

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