I need to grab the content after the last match of ENTRY to the end of the file, and I can't seem to do it. It can be multiple lines and the data can include any character to the end of the file including (,\n, ).

I’ve tried:

tail -1 file # doesn’t work due to it not consistently being one line
grep "^(.*"  # only grabs one line
pcregrep -M  '\n(.*' file # I think a variation of this is the solution, but I’ve had no luck so far.  

File that grows below:

TOP OF FILE                
%
ENTRY
(S®s
√6ûíπ‹ôTìßÅDPˆ¬k·Ù"=ÓxF)*†‰ú˚ÃQ´¿J‘\˜©ŒG»‡∫QÆ’<πsµ-ù±ñ∞NäAOilWçk
N+P}V<ôÒ∏≠µW*`Hß”;–GØ»14∏åR"ºã
FD‘mÍõ?*ÊÎÉC)(S®s
√6ûíπ‹ôTìßÅDPˆ¬k·Ù"=ÓxF)*†‰ú˚ÃQ´¿J‘\˜©ŒG»‡∫QÆ’<πsµ-ù±ñ∞NäAOilWçk
N+P}V<ôÒ∏≠µW*`Hß”;–GØ»14∏åR"ºã
FD‘mÍõ?*ÊÎÉC)eq  
{
DATA
}
ENTRY
(A® S\kÉflã1»Âbπ¯Ú∞⁄äπHZ@F◊§•Ã*‹¡‹…ÿPkJòÑíòú˛¶à˛¨¢v|u«Ùbó–Ö¶¢∂5ıÜ@¨•˘®@W´≥‡*`H∑”ı–Só¬<˙ìEçöf∞Gg±:œe™flflå)A®  S\kÉflã1»Âbπ¯Ú∞⁄äπHZ@F◊§•Ã*‹¡‹…ÿPkJòÑíòú˛¶à˛¨¢v|u«Ùbó–Ö¶¢∂5ıÜ@¨•˘®@W´≥‡*`H∑”ı–Só¬<˙ìEçöf∞Gg±:œe™flflå)eq  
{
DATA
}if
ENTRY
(ÌSYõ˛9°\K¬∞≈fl|”/í÷L
Ö˙h/ÜÇi"û£fi±€ÀNéÓ›bÏÿmâ[≈4J’XPü´Z
oÜlø∫…qìõ¢,ßü©cÓ{—˜e&ÚÀÓHÏÜ‚m(Œ∆⁄ˆQ˝òêpoÉÄÂ(S‘E ⁄ !ŸQ§ô6ÉH
  • Your text indicates that you want everything after the last occurrence of ENTRY. Your various commands look for things after a line which begins (. What is your preference? – John1024 Sep 15 '15 at 0:35
  • 1
    Note that you have various forms of 'curly quotes' ( ) in the scripts as shown in the question. Bash won't like those; you must use " and '. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 15 '15 at 0:37
  • @John1024 your answer so far is working perfectly. I really need (dataEOF – Pumphouse Sep 15 '15 at 0:39
  • @JonathanLeffler I belive that is a huge part of my frustration/difficulty. I have no ability to change the data. It's a ~hash that cant' be edited. – Pumphouse Sep 15 '15 at 0:40
  • I'm referring to the characters in the "I've tried" section, which you must be in charge of. The data isn't an issue (it screws with the telnet session I happen to be using, but that's my problem). – Jonathan Leffler Sep 15 '15 at 0:42
up vote 5 down vote accepted
$ awk '/^[(]/{s="";} {s=s"\n"$0;} END{print substr(s,2);}' file
(ÌSYõ˛9°\K¬∞≈fl|”/í÷L
Ö˙h/ÜÇi"û£fi±€ÀNéÓ›bÏÿmâ[≈4J’XPü´Z
oÜlø∫…qìõ¢,ßü©cÓ{—˜e&ÚÀÓHÏÜ‚m(Œ∆⁄ˆQ˝òêpoÉÄÂ(S‘E ⁄ !ŸQ§ô6ÉH

How it works

awk implicitly loops through files line-by-line. This script stores whatever we want to print in the variable s.

  • /^[(]/{s="";}

    Every time that we find a line which starts with (, we set s to an empty string.

    The purpose of this is to remove everything before the last occurrence of a line starting with (.

  • s=s"\n"$0

    We add the current line onto the end of s.

  • END{print substr(s,2);}

    After we reach the end of the file, we print s (omitting the first character which will be a surplus newline character).

  • 1
    Thanks again, I really have been trying to figure this out since last night. I appreciate it. – Pumphouse Sep 15 '15 at 1:10
  • if I wanted to print to a file is it just > file? – Pumphouse Sep 16 '15 at 6:35
  • 1
    @Pumphouse Yes, as long as it is a different file. (You can't print to the file your reading from.) – John1024 Sep 16 '15 at 6:39
  • thanks. I just upvoted a bunch of your stuff to try and show appreciation. – Pumphouse Sep 16 '15 at 6:41

Interesting problem. I think you can do it with just sed. When you find a match, zero the hold space and add the match line to the hold space. On the last line, print the hold space.

sed -n -e '/ENTRY/,$ { /ENTRY/ { h; n; }; H; $ { x; p; } }'

Don't print by default. From the first entry to the end of the file:

  • If it is an entry line; copy the new line over the hold space and move on.
  • Otherwise append the line to the hold space.
  • If it is the last line, swap the hold space and pattern space, and print the pattern space (what was in the hold space).

You might worry about what happens if the last line in the file is an ENTRY line.

Given a data file:

TOP OF FILE
not wanted
ENTRY
could be wanted
ENTRY
but it wasn't
and this isn't
because
ENTRY
this is here
EOF

The output is:

ENTRY
this is here
EOF

If you don't want ENTRY to appear, modify the script slightly:

sed -n -e '/ENTRY/,$ { /ENTRY/ { s/.*//; h; n; }; H; $ { x; s/^\n//; p; } }'

Using tac you could do it:

tac <file> | sed -e '/ENTRY/,$d' | tac

This will print the file with the lines reversed, then use sed to remove everything from what is now the first occurrence of ENTRY to the now end of the file, then reverse the lines again to get the original order.

As Jonathan Leffler pointed out, a faster way to do this--though probably not much because tac will still have a lot to do and it has all the overhead of rquireing 3 processes instead of just one, but the sed could be done more efficiently, but just ending when we find the ENTRY line, instead of processing the rest of the file to remove the lines:

tac <file> | sed -e '/ENTRY/q' | tac

though his answer is often going to be better still. That answer will include the ENTRY line. If you don't want that you could also do

tac <file> | sed -n '/ENTRY/q;p' | tac

to not print any ouptut by default, then quit as soon as you find the ENTRY line, but use the p command to print the lines until you get to that line.

  • 1
    It's a simple and effective solution, but uses three processes where one is sufficient. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 15 '15 at 0:47
  • @JonathanLeffler Fair enough, though until I saw your solution I didn't know how to do it with one! I will have to work through yours, but I would already endorse choosing that answer of the three currently offered – Eric Renouf Sep 15 '15 at 0:50
  • 1
    If you need to get it done immediately, and the file isn't monstrous (not bigger than MiB), then it may be more effective than spending the time working out how to avoid the multiple processes. If you've got a monstrous file, you could use sed -e '/ENTRY/q' so you stop processing on the first ENTRY line. But the prior tac may have significant work to do, especially if its input comes from a pipe or something else non-seekable. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 15 '15 at 0:54

This should work too (at least with gawk)

awk -vRS="ENTRY" 'END{print $0}'

set the record separator as your pattern and print the last record.

loadind file in memory

 sed -e 'H;$!d' -e 'x;s/.*ENTRY[[:blank:]]*\n//' YourFile

Your Answer

By clicking "Post Your Answer", you acknowledge that you have read our updated terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy, and that your continued use of the website is subject to these policies.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.