30

Trying to make Feature generic and then suddenly compiler said

Operator '?' cannot be applied to operand of type 'T'

Here is the code

public abstract class Feature<T>
{
    public T Value
    {
        get { return GetValue?.Invoke(); } // here is error
        set { SetValue?.Invoke(value); }
    }

    public Func<T> GetValue { get; set; }
    public Action<T> SetValue { get; set; }
}

It is possible to use this code instead

get
{
    if (GetValue != null)
        return GetValue();
    return default(T);
}

But I am wondering how to fix that nice C# 6.0 one-liner.

7
  • 2
    That's really interesting. I think it might be a bug. All of the answers which suggest using where T : class are missing the fact that you're checking if the Func<T> is null not a T, as your second block of code shows. If that works then the GetValue?.Invoke() syntax should work also. You should be able to write: return GetValue?.Invoke() ?? default(T)
    – kjbartel
    Sep 15, 2015 at 8:02
  • @kjbartel: I think it's due to ?. returning null if the expression was null, and not default(T).
    – Joey
    Sep 15, 2015 at 8:06
  • 1
    Func<T> is nullable.
    – kjbartel
    Sep 15, 2015 at 8:09
  • 2
    I think, problem is that compiler can not determine result type of GetValue?.Invoke(). If T is class or Nullable<>, than result type should be T, but if T is struct, than result type should be T?. Sep 15, 2015 at 8:26
  • 3
    @kjbartel Result type of List?.Count is int?. It is know at compile time, that type should be promoted to nullable. Result type of GetValue?.Invoke() is T or T?. It is not know at compile time, should type be promoted to nullable, or it nullable already. Sep 15, 2015 at 8:37

3 Answers 3

43

Since not everything can be null, you have to narrow down T to be something nullable (aka an object). Structs can't be null, and neither can enums.

Adding a where on class does fix the issue:

public abstract class Feature<T> where T : class

So why doesn't it just work?

Invoke() yields T. If GetValue is null, the ? operator sets the return value of type T to null, which it can't. If T is int for example, it can't make it nullable (int?) since the actual type required (T = int) isn't.

If you change T to be int in your code, you will see the problem very clearly. The end result of what you ask is this:

get
{
    int? x = GetValue?.Invoke();
    return x.GetValueOrDefault(0);
}

This is not something the null-propagation operator will do for you. If you revert to the use of default(T) it does know exactly what to do and you avoid the 'problematic' null-propagation.

11
  • 4
    I would just accept that the C# compiler doesn't allow this and that you need your option #2 in order to make this work. Not everything has to be a one liner, right? Sep 15, 2015 at 8:11
  • 1
    The actuall error is Cannot lift conditional access expression type 'T' to nullable type. The .? operator wraps the return type of child into Nullable<>. The compiler can handle Nullable<void> but not Nullable<T>. thats why there is no error for Action<T>.Invoke. Sep 15, 2015 at 8:28
  • 2
    @Sinatr you can do it in another way, refer T to struct : public abstract class Feature<T> where T : struct. then mark all T types as null. public Func<T?> ,public Action<T?>,public T? Value.however in this way you can only work with value types. Sep 15, 2015 at 8:34
  • 1
    @kjbartel this answer is correct. Since not everything can be null, thats true and thats why nullable<T> is not valid. because only non-nullable things can be marked as nullable. Sep 15, 2015 at 8:57
  • 2
    @kjbartel Invoke() yields T. If GetValue is null, the ? operator sets the return value of type T to null, which it can't. Sep 15, 2015 at 9:35
8

T must be a reference type or a nullable type

public abstract class Feature<T> where T : class
{
    // ...
}
4

As far as I know the ?. operator is hardcoded to work with null, that is, it works for reference types or nullable value types, but not normal value types. The problem is likely that the operator returns null if the expression was null instead of default(T).

You might be able to fix it by restricting T to class here.

2
  • @PanagiotisKanavos: Nullable<T> is treated by the compiler as nullable, like it should, but it's a value type.
    – Joey
    Sep 15, 2015 at 8:05
  • should have checked the reference source first ! Sep 15, 2015 at 8:06

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.