3

I'm looking for a quick and easy one-liner to extract all brace-delimited text-blocks containing a search string from a text file. I've just about googled myself crazy on this, but everyone seems to be only posting about getting the text between braces without a search string.

I've got a large text file with contents like this:

blabla
blabla {
  blabla
}
blabla
blabla {
  blabla
  blablaeventblabla
}
blabla

The vast majority of bracketed entries do not contain the search string, which is "event".

What I am trying to extract are all text (especially including multi-line matches) between each set of curly braces, but only if said text also contains the search string. So output like this:

blabla {
  blabla
  blablaeventblabla
}

My linux command line is /usr/bin/bash. I've been trying various grep and awk commands, but just can't get it to work:

awk '/{/,/event/,/}/' filepath

grep -iE "/{.*event.*/}" filepath

I was thinking this would be really easy, as it's a common task. What am I missing here?

2

This gnu-awk should work:

awk -v RS='[^\n]*{|}' 'RT ~ /{/{p=RT} /event/{ print p $0 RT }' file
blabla {
   blabla
   blablaeventblabla
}

RS='[^\n]*{\n|}' sets input record separator as any text followed by { OR a }. RT is the internal awk variable that is set to matched text based on RS regex.

3
  • 1
    This works well as long as the matching curly braces are not on the same line. The other answer handles that case as well (the one from user 9999999..9 that disappeared). I see that I'm going to have to read up a lot on awk as well if I wish to understand this answer. Perhaps tonight.
    – leu
    Sep 16 '15 at 9:49
  • See updated answer to allow for { and } on same lines.
    – anubhava
    Sep 16 '15 at 10:10
  • 1
    Thanks anubhava, works great! Accepting as answer. Of course, this answer has the same caveat as the other answer in case of a malformed file (as in nested blocks of curly braces or a matching brace missing).
    – leu
    Sep 16 '15 at 10:35
1

User 999999999999999999999999999999 had a nice answer using sed which I really liked, unfortunately their answer appears to have disappeared for some reason.

Here it is for those who might be interested:

sed '/{/{:1; /}/!{N; b1}; /event/p}; d' filepath

Explanation:

/{/ if current line contains{then execute next block { start block :1; label for code to jump to /}/! if the line does not contain}then execute next block { start block N; add next line to pattern space b1 jump to label 1 }; end block /event/p if the pattern space contains the search string, print it (at this point the pattern space contains a full block of lines from{to}) }; end block d delete pattern space

1
  • Anyone using this please beware that in the case of a malformed file (as in nested blocks of curly braces or a matching brace missing), the results can be unexpected.
    – leu
    Sep 16 '15 at 9:44
1

Here is a modified version of this gem from 'leu' (10x leu for enlighten us). This one is doing something very similarly. Extract everything between which begin with 'DEC::PKCS7[' and ending with ']!':

cat file | sed '/^DEC::PKCS7\[/{s///; :1; /\]\!$/!{N; b1;}; s///;};'
Explanation:
/^DEC::PKCS7\[/             # if current line begins with 'DEC::PKCS7[' then execute next block
{                           # start block
    s///;                       # remove all upto 'DEC::PKCS7['
    :1;                         # label '1' for code to jump to
    /\]\!$/!                     # if the line does not end with ']!' then execute next block
    {                               # start block
        N;                          # add next line to pattern space
        b1;                         # jump to label 1
    };                          # end block
    s///;                       # remove all from ']!' to end of line
};                          # end block

Notes:

  • This works on single and multi-line.
  • This will have unexpected behavior if you have ']!' in the middle of the input.
  • This does not answer the question. It's already answered very well. My intentions are just to help other cases.

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