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Maybe relevant: What does django rest framework mean trade offs between view vs viewsets?

What is the difference between views and viewsets? And what about router and urlpatterns?

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  • 1
    Have you read the tutorial about viewsets? It describes moving from views + urlpatterns to viewsets + routers. Is there anything specific that you don't understand?
    – Alasdair
    Sep 15, 2015 at 14:54
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    Hi @Alasdair, yes, I read the tutorial and while it explains very well how to work with viewsets it doesn't seem to spend many words on what are the differences between viewsets and views. The only paragraph that seems relevant is "ViewSet classes are almost the same thing as View classes, except that they provide operations such as read, or update, and not method handlers such as get or put". But even this paragraph doesn't seem particular clear (e.g., why would you prefer read and update to get or put?). Sep 15, 2015 at 14:58
  • 1
    The benefit of read and update over get and put is that you have uncoupled the api methods from the HTTP methods used to call them. You can then use routers to hook the viewset into the urls, which saves code and can make your API more consistent.
    – Alasdair
    Sep 15, 2015 at 15:21

1 Answer 1

146

ViewSets and Routers are simple tools to speed up the implementation of your API if you're aiming for standard behaviour and standard URLs.

Using ViewSet you don't have to create separate views for getting a list of objects and detail of one object. ViewSet will handle for you in a consistent way both list and detail.

Using Router will connect your ViewSet into "standarized" (it's not standard in any global way, just some structure that was implemented by creators of Django REST framework) structure of URLs. That way you don't have to create your urlpatterns by hand and you're guaranteed that all of your URLs are consistent (at least on the layer that Router is responsible for).

It looks like not much, but when implementing some huge API where you will have many and many urlpatterns and views, using ViewSets and Routers will make big difference.

For better explanation: this is code using ViewSets and Routers:

views.py:

from snippets.models import Article
from rest_framework import viewsets
from yourapp.serializers import ArticleSerializer

class ArticleViewSet(viewsets.ModelViewSet):
    queryset = Article.objects.all()
    serializer_class = ArticleSerializer

urls.py:

from django.conf.urls import url, include
from yourapp import views
from rest_framework.routers import DefaultRouter

router = DefaultRouter()
router.register(r'articles', views.ArticleViewSet)

urlpatterns = [
    url(r'^', include(router.urls)),
]

And equivalent result using normal Views and no routers:

views.py:

from snippets.models import Article
from snippets.serializers import ArticleSerializer
from rest_framework import generics


class ArticleList(generics.ListCreateAPIView):
    queryset = Article.objects.all()
    serializer_class = ArticleSerializer


class ArticleDetail(generics.RetrieveUpdateDestroyAPIView):
    queryset = Article.objects.all()
    serializer_class = ArticleSerializer

urls.py

from django.conf.urls import url, include
from yourapp import views

urlpatterns = [
    url(r'articles/^', views.ArticleList.as_view(), name="article-list"),
    url(r'articles/(?P<pk>[0-9]+)/^', views.ArticleDetail.as_view(), name="article-detail"),
]
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  • 2
    Sorry, but I continue not to see it. :( What is the difference between: router = routers.SimpleRouter(); router.register(r'accounts', AccountViewSet) and urlpatterns = [url(r'^accounts/', AccountView),]? Sep 15, 2015 at 16:32
  • 9
    First one will register 2 URLs, one for list and one for detail, see updated answer
    – GwynBleidD
    Sep 16, 2015 at 9:06
  • 2
    Great example this helped me a lot, even though I've used class based views I had I hard time seeing the difference. This makes it so obvious, I wish the docs were like this. Quick question though: In your first example for the viewsets did you forgot to import Article?
    – Amon
    Sep 20, 2018 at 16:02

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