196

I'm trying to write a function that capitalizes the first letter of every word in a string (converting the string to title case).

For instance, when the input is "I'm a little tea pot", I expect "I'm A Little Tea Pot" to be the output. However, the function returns "i'm a little tea pot".

This is my code:

function titleCase(str) {
  var splitStr = str.toLowerCase().split(" ");

  for (var i = 0; i < splitStr.length; i++) {
    if (splitStr.length[i] < splitStr.length) {
      splitStr[i].charAt(0).toUpperCase();
    }

    str = splitStr.join(" ");
  }

  return str;
}

console.log(titleCase("I'm a little tea pot"));

7
  • That does not look like it capitalizes the first letter of just a string. Or do you mean you want to capitalize each word contained in the string. Sep 15, 2015 at 14:54
  • 3
    You are not assigining your capitalisation to your result, the splitStr[i].charAt(0).toUpperCase(); is going to void. You need to do splitStr[i] = splitStr[i].charAt(0).toUpperCase() + splitStr[i].substring(1); Sep 15, 2015 at 14:54
  • 1
    You should tell us first. What is wrong with that function? What is the expected result and what does it return instead? Sep 15, 2015 at 14:55
  • This function looks like it attempts to capitalize the first character of every word.
    – Halcyon
    Sep 15, 2015 at 14:56
  • 5
    Like the title says, I am trying to capitalize the first letter of each word in the string. I don't appreciate the downvotes or the negativity on a forum that is supposed to be supportive in nature. @somethinghere - Thank you for your response.
    – slurrr
    Sep 15, 2015 at 21:45

42 Answers 42

225

You are not assigning your changes to the array again, so all your efforts are in vain. Try this:

function titleCase(str) {
   var splitStr = str.toLowerCase().split(' ');
   for (var i = 0; i < splitStr.length; i++) {
       // You do not need to check if i is larger than splitStr length, as your for does that for you
       // Assign it back to the array
       splitStr[i] = splitStr[i].charAt(0).toUpperCase() + splitStr[i].substring(1);     
   }
   // Directly return the joined string
   return splitStr.join(' '); 
}

document.write(titleCase("I'm a little tea pot"));

10
  • @Halcyon That would just result in one letter for each word. Sep 15, 2015 at 14:59
  • 37
    In es6, you can do this, which looks a bit nicer: myStr.toLowerCase().split(' ').map(word => word.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + word.substring(1)).join(' '); Nov 8, 2018 at 22:23
  • 1
    @PatrickMichaelsen Indeed you can. I won't change the answer though, its from 2015 and I know times have changed but I'll keep it up for posterity. Also, I wouldn't write it like this anymore either :) But feel free to post yours as your own answer I guess? Nov 9, 2018 at 8:44
  • 3
    Yes, I agree, the current answer is fine. That's why I put it in the comments, simply for reference of newer visitors. Nov 10, 2018 at 9:13
  • 1
    I ran a benchmark of this function against 3 competitor functions and found it to be the most performant - less than 1/3 the execution time of the worst competitor (Chrome 73). jsben.ch/AkHgP Apr 17, 2019 at 4:26
152

You are making complex a very easy thing. You can add this in your CSS:

.capitalize {
    text-transform: capitalize;
}

In JavaScript, you can add the class to an element

 document.getElementById("element").className = "capitalize";
9
  • 6
    thanks for the reply, but I am trying to do this using javascript for practice @MarcosPérezGude
    – slurrr
    Sep 15, 2015 at 21:47
  • 1
    Yeah, it's real versatile Nov 30, 2017 at 14:35
  • 4
    this is a "display only" change, the string itself is not changed. There's no reason to assume that the intended output is an HTML element - there's no indication that the code in the question is even in a browser! Dec 1, 2017 at 1:54
  • 3
    Unfortunately in some cases if the value is 20mm and you use capitalize it will be 20Mm. Some cases javascript might be the only method. May 8, 2020 at 7:02
  • 1
    As others have stated the question wasn't how to display capitalised text, but instead "converting the string to title case"
    – esp
    Mar 4, 2021 at 4:00
128

ECMAScript 6 version:

const toTitleCase = (phrase) => {
  return phrase
    .toLowerCase()
    .split(' ')
    .map(word => word.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + word.slice(1))
    .join(' ');
};

let result = toTitleCase('maRy hAd a lIttLe LaMb');
console.log(result);

2
  • 1
    I also think you are missing, toLowerCase() on the very beginning, just in case the user or string is mixed case.
    – ArchNoob
    Jun 5, 2018 at 0:26
  • In this case, you will convert all non single space " " to single space " "
    – Mahesh
    Jun 11, 2021 at 19:03
69

Shortest One Liner (also extremely fast):

 text.replace(/(^\w|\s\w)/g, m => m.toUpperCase());

Explanation:

  • ^\w : first character of the string
  • | : or
  • \s\w : first character after whitespace
  • (^\w|\s\w) Capture the pattern.
  • g Flag: Match all occurrences.

If you want to make sure the rest is in lowercase:

text.replace(/(^\w|\s\w)(\S*)/g, (_,m1,m2) => m1.toUpperCase()+m2.toLowerCase())

Example usage:

const toTitleCase = str => str.replace(/(^\w|\s\w)(\S*)/g, (_,m1,m2) => m1.toUpperCase()+m2.toLowerCase())

console.log(toTitleCase("heLLo worLd"));

5
  • 1
    This is awsome! RegEx are the best. Can yo uelaborate more on what this part does? m => m.toUpperCase()
    – marcin2x4
    Jul 18, 2020 at 16:34
  • 1
    @marcin2x4 m matches the first character, so it makes first character uppercase.
    – chickens
    Oct 9, 2020 at 4:08
  • It doesn't uppercase words like şalk. Feb 26, 2021 at 10:06
  • @AbsoluteBeginner you will need to replace toUpperCase and toLowerCase with a locale sensitive function like toLocaleUpperCase and toLocaleLowerCase
    – chickens
    Feb 27, 2021 at 22:23
  • This solution also retains the whitespace between the words Input -> hello-----world $$$ Other solution -> Hello-World $$$ This solution -> Hello-----World
    – Mahesh
    Jun 11, 2021 at 19:09
60

I think this way should be faster; cause it doesn't split string and join it again; just using regex.

var str = text.toLowerCase().replace(/(^\w{1})|(\s{1}\w{1})/g, match => match.toUpperCase());

Explanation:

  1. (^\w{1}): match first char of string
  2. |: or
  3. (\s{1}\w{1}): match one char that came after one space
  4. g: match all
  5. match => match.toUpperCase(): replace with can take function, so; replace match with upper case match
6
  • Why \s{1}? I'd say \s+, so it works even with several spaces between words Jan 1, 2020 at 14:34
  • In my case; it’s exactly 1 space, and yes; it should work!
    – Nimer Esam
    Jan 1, 2020 at 14:45
  • Strings are immutable. regex will be splitting and joining under the hood. No way around it actually. Jul 5, 2020 at 3:49
  • It doesn't uppercase words like şalk. Feb 26, 2021 at 10:06
  • 1
    If the input is all uppercase it does nothing
    – Savage
    Nov 15, 2021 at 18:03
34

If you can use a third-party library then Lodash has a helper function for you.

https://lodash.com/docs/4.17.3#startCase

_.startCase('foo bar');
// => 'Foo Bar'

_.startCase('--foo-bar--');
// => 'Foo Bar'

_.startCase('fooBar');
// => 'Foo Bar'

_.startCase('__FOO_BAR__');
// => 'FOO BAR'
<script src="https://cdn.jsdelivr.net/lodash/4.17.3/lodash.min.js"></script>

23

In ECMAScript 6, a one-line answer using the arrow function:

const captialize = words => words.split(' ').map( w =>  w.substring(0,1).toUpperCase()+ w.substring(1)).join(' ')
2
  • 5
    Nice! You can use w[0] to make it even shorter.. Unlike regex it is easily extendable by ANY symbol but not only space. By any I mean ( [ ", because letters should be capitalized after these symbols as well. So thanks for your solution! Dec 19, 2019 at 20:36
  • This is golden! Jun 30, 2021 at 9:11
14

ECMAScript 6 version:

title
    .split(/ /g).map(word =>
        `${word.substring(0,1).toUpperCase()}${word.substring(1)}`)
    .join(" ");
1
  • 6
    I only saw this now and it's pretty neat, but I think you need to join using a " " instead of "", otherwise you will get one big word, no? Feb 1, 2017 at 9:18
10
text-transform: capitalize;

CSS has got it :)

0
9

𝗙𝗮𝘀𝘁𝗲𝘀𝘁 𝗦𝗼𝗹𝘂𝘁𝗶𝗼𝗻 𝗙𝗼𝗿 𝗟𝗮𝘁𝗶𝗻-𝗜 𝗖𝗵𝗮𝗿𝗮𝗰𝘁𝗲𝗿𝘀

You could simply use a regular expression function to change the capitalization of each letter. With V8 JIST optimizations, this should prove to be the fast and memory efficient.

// Only works on Latin-I strings
'tHe VeRy LOOong StRINg'.replace(/\b[a-z]|['_][a-z]|\B[A-Z]/g, function(x){return x[0]==="'"||x[0]==="_"?x:String.fromCharCode(x.charCodeAt(0)^32)})

Or, as a function:

// Only works for Latin-I strings
var fromCharCode = String.fromCharCode;
var firstLetterOfWordRegExp = /\b[a-z]|['_][a-z]|\B[A-Z]/g;
function toLatin1UpperCase(x){ // avoid frequent anonymous inline functions
    var charCode = x.charCodeAt(0);
    return charCode===39 ? x : fromCharCode(charCode^32);
}
function titleCase(string){
    return string.replace(firstLetterOfWordRegExp, toLatin1UpperCase);
}

According to this benchmark, the code is over 33% faster than the next best solution in Chrome.


𝗗𝗲𝗺𝗼

<textarea id="input" type="text">I'm a little tea pot</textarea><br /><br />
<textarea id="output" type="text" readonly=""></textarea>
<script>
(function(){
    "use strict"
    var fromCode = String.fromCharCode;
    function upper(x){return x[0]==="'"?x:fromCode(x.charCodeAt(0) ^ 32)}
    (input.oninput = function(){
      output.value = input.value.replace(/\b[a-z]|['_][a-z]|\B[A-Z]/g, upper);
    })();
})();
</script>

2
  • You forgot to add return to your function as in: function autoCaps(string){ return string.replace(/\b[a-z]|\B[A-Z]/g, function(x){ return String.fromCharCode(x.charCodeAt(0)^32); }); }
    – Archy
    Aug 7, 2018 at 6:17
  • @Archy Thank you for your correction. I have made the change you proposed.
    – Jack G
    Apr 25, 2019 at 19:15
7

Also a good option (particularly if you're using freeCodeCamp):

function titleCase(str) {
  var wordsArray = str.toLowerCase().split(/\s+/);
  var upperCased = wordsArray.map(function(word) {
    return word.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + word.substr(1);
  });
  return upperCased.join(" ");
}
0
5

I usually prefer not to use regexp because of readability and also I try to stay away from loops. I think this is kind of readable.

function capitalizeFirstLetter(string) {
    return string && string.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + string.substring(1);
};
1
  • This capitalizes the first letter of only the 1st word of the string. The OP is asking about capitalizing each word! Feb 7 at 16:32
5

This routine will handle hyphenated words and words with apostrophe.

function titleCase(txt) {
    var firstLtr = 0;
    for (var i = 0;i < text.length;i++) {
        if (i == 0 &&/[a-zA-Z]/.test(text.charAt(i)))
            firstLtr = 2;
        if (firstLtr == 0 &&/[a-zA-Z]/.test(text.charAt(i)))
            firstLtr = 2;
        if (firstLtr == 1 &&/[^a-zA-Z]/.test(text.charAt(i))){
            if (text.charAt(i) == "'") {
                if (i + 2 == text.length &&/[a-zA-Z]/.test(text.charAt(i + 1)))
                    firstLtr = 3;
                else if (i + 2 < text.length &&/[^a-zA-Z]/.test(text.charAt(i + 2)))
                    firstLtr = 3;
            }
        if (firstLtr == 3)
            firstLtr = 1;
        else
            firstLtr = 0;
        }
        if (firstLtr == 2) {
            firstLtr = 1;
            text = text.substr(0, i) + text.charAt(i).toUpperCase() + text.substr(i + 1);
        }
        else {
            text = text.substr(0, i) + text.charAt(i).toLowerCase() + text.substr(i + 1);
        }
    }
}

titleCase("pAt o'Neil's");
// returns "Pat O'Neil's";
0
5

You can use modern JS syntax which can make your life much easier. Here is my code snippet for the given problem:

const capitalizeString = string => string.split(' ').map(item => item.replace(item.charAt(0), item.charAt(0).toUpperCase())).join(' ');
capitalizeString('Hi! i am aditya shrivastwa')

4
function LetterCapitalize(str) { 
  return str.split(" ").map(item=>item.substring(0,1).toUpperCase()+item.substring(1)).join(" ")
}
4

let cap = (str) => {
  let arr = str.split(' ');
  arr.forEach(function(item, index) {
    arr[index] = item.replace(item[0], item[0].toUpperCase());
  });

  return arr.join(' ');
};

console.log(cap("I'm a little tea pot"));

Fast Readable Version see benchmark http://jsben.ch/k3JVz enter image description here

4

ES6 syntax

const captilizeAllWords = (sentence) => {
  if (typeof sentence !== "string") return sentence;
  return sentence.split(' ')
    .map(word => word.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + word.slice(1))
    .join(' ');
}


captilizeAllWords('Something is going on here')
1
  • Shouldn't the word.slice(1) be replaced with word.slice(1).toLowerCase() to make sure the rest is not capitalized (just in case it was in the original sentence) ?
    – Anton Krug
    Jan 3, 2020 at 16:44
4

Or it can be done using replace(), and replace each word's first letter with its "upperCase".

function titleCase(str) {
    return str.toLowerCase().split(' ').map(function(word) {
               return word.replace(word[0], word[0].toUpperCase());
           }).join(' ');
}

titleCase("I'm a little tea pot");
0
3

The function below does not change any other part of the string than trying to convert all the first letters of all words (i.e. by the regex definition \w+) to uppercase.

That means it does not necessarily convert words to Titlecase, but does exactly what the title of the question says: "Capitalize First Letter Of Each Word In A String - JavaScript"

  • Don't split the string
  • determine each word by the regex \w+ that is equivalent to [A-Za-z0-9_]+
    • apply function String.prototype.toUpperCase() only to the first character of each word.
function first_char_to_uppercase(argument) {
  return argument.replace(/\w+/g, function(word) {
    return word.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + word.slice(1);
  });
}

Examples:

first_char_to_uppercase("I'm a little tea pot");
// "I'M A Little Tea Pot"
// This may look wrong to you, but was the intended result for me
// You may wanna extend the regex to get the result you desire, e.g., /[\w']+/

first_char_to_uppercase("maRy hAd a lIttLe LaMb");
// "MaRy HAd A LIttLe LaMb"
// Again, it does not convert words to Titlecase

first_char_to_uppercase(
  "ExampleX: CamelCase/UPPERCASE&lowercase,exampleY:N0=apples"
);
// "ExampleX: CamelCase/UPPERCASE&Lowercase,ExampleY:N0=Apples"

first_char_to_uppercase("…n1=orangesFromSPAIN&&n2!='a sub-string inside'");
// "…N1=OrangesFromSPAIN&&N2!='A Sub-String Inside'"

first_char_to_uppercase("snake_case_example_.Train-case-example…");
// "Snake_case_example_.Train-Case-Example…"
// Note that underscore _ is part of the RegEx \w+

first_char_to_uppercase(
  "Capitalize First Letter of each word in a String - JavaScript"
);
// "Capitalize First Letter Of Each Word In A String - JavaScript"

Edit 2019-02-07: If you want actual Titlecase (i.e. only the first letter uppercase all others lowercase):

function titlecase_all_words(argument) {
  return argument.replace(/\w+/g, function(word) {
    return word.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + word.slice(1).toLowerCase();
  });
}

Examples showing both:

test_phrases = [
  "I'm a little tea pot",
  "maRy hAd a lIttLe LaMb",
  "ExampleX: CamelCase/UPPERCASE&lowercase,exampleY:N0=apples",
  "…n1=orangesFromSPAIN&&n2!='a sub-string inside'",
  "snake_case_example_.Train-case-example…",
  "Capitalize First Letter of each word in a String - JavaScript"
];
for (el in test_phrases) {
  let phrase = test_phrases[el];
  console.log(
    phrase,
    "<- input phrase\n",
    first_char_to_uppercase(phrase),
    "<- first_char_to_uppercase\n",
    titlecase_all_words(phrase),
    "<- titlecase_all_words\n "
  );
}

// I'm a little tea pot <- input phrase
// I'M A Little Tea Pot <- first_char_to_uppercase
// I'M A Little Tea Pot <- titlecase_all_words

// maRy hAd a lIttLe LaMb <- input phrase
// MaRy HAd A LIttLe LaMb <- first_char_to_uppercase
// Mary Had A Little Lamb <- titlecase_all_words

// ExampleX: CamelCase/UPPERCASE&lowercase,exampleY:N0=apples <- input phrase
// ExampleX: CamelCase/UPPERCASE&Lowercase,ExampleY:N0=Apples <- first_char_to_uppercase
// Examplex: Camelcase/Uppercase&Lowercase,Exampley:N0=Apples <- titlecase_all_words

// …n1=orangesFromSPAIN&&n2!='a sub-string inside' <- input phrase
// …N1=OrangesFromSPAIN&&N2!='A Sub-String Inside' <- first_char_to_uppercase
// …N1=Orangesfromspain&&N2!='A Sub-String Inside' <- titlecase_all_words

// snake_case_example_.Train-case-example… <- input phrase
// Snake_case_example_.Train-Case-Example… <- first_char_to_uppercase
// Snake_case_example_.Train-Case-Example… <- titlecase_all_words

// Capitalize First Letter of each word in a String - JavaScript <- input phrase
// Capitalize First Letter Of Each Word In A String - JavaScript <- first_char_to_uppercase
// Capitalize First Letter Of Each Word In A String - Javascript <- titlecase_all_words
3
function titleCase(str) {

    var myString = str.toLowerCase().split(' ');
    for (var i = 0; i < myString.length; i++) {
        var subString = myString[i].split('');
        for (var j = 0; j < subString.length; j++) {
            subString[0] = subString[0].toUpperCase();
        }
        myString[i] = subString.join('');
    }

    return myString.join(' ');
}
1
  • 1
    Add some comments to your answer.
    – HDJEMAI
    Dec 4, 2016 at 4:38
3

TypeScript fat arrow FTW

export const formatTitleCase = (string: string) =>
    string
        .toLowerCase()
        .split(" ")
        .map((word) => word.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + word.substring(1))
        .join(" ");
3

Here a simple one-liner

const ucFirst = t => t.replace(/(^|\s)[A-Za-zÀ-ÖØ-öø-ÿ]/g, c => c.toUpperCase());

Note that it only changes case of first letter of every word, you might want to use it as so:

console.log(ucFirst('foO bAr'));
// FoO BAr

console.log(ucFirst('foO bAr'.toLowerCase()));
// Foo Bar

// works with accents too
console.log(ucFirst('éfoO bAr'));
// ÉfoO BAr

Or based on String.prototype here is one that handles several modes:

String.prototype.ucFirst = function (mode = 'eachWord') {
  const modes = {
    eachWord: /(^|\s)[A-Za-zÀ-ÖØ-öø-ÿ]/g,
    firstWord: /(^|\s)[A-Za-zÀ-ÖØ-öø-ÿ]/,
    firstChar: /^[A-Za-zÀ-ÖØ-öø-ÿ]/,
    firstLetter: /[A-Za-zÀ-ÖØ-öø-ÿ]/,
  };

  if (mode in modes) {
    return this.replace(modes[mode], c => c.toUpperCase());
  } else {
    throw `error: ucFirst invalid mode (${mode}). Parameter should be one of: ` + Object.keys(modes).join('|');
  }
};

console.log('eachWord', 'foO bAr'.ucFirst());
// FoO BAr

console.log('eachWord', 'foO bAr'.toLowerCase().ucFirst());
// Foo Bar

console.log('firstWord', '1foO bAr'.ucFirst('firstWord'));
// 1foO BAr

console.log('firstChar', '1foO bAr'.ucFirst('firstChar'));
// 1foO bAr

console.log('firstLetter', '1foO bAr'.ucFirst('firstLetter'));
// 1FoO bAr

Edit:

Or based on String.prototype one that handles several modes and an optional second argument to specify word separators (String or RegExp):

String.prototype.ucFirst = function (mode = 'eachWord', wordSeparator = /\s/) {
  const letters = /[A-Za-zÀ-ÖØ-öø-ÿ]/;
  const ws =
    '^|' +
    (wordSeparator instanceof RegExp
      ? '(' + wordSeparator.source + ')'
      : // sanitize string for RegExp https://stackoverflow.com/questions/3446170/escape-string-for-use-in-javascript-regex#comment52837041_6969486
        '[' + wordSeparator.replace(/[[{}()*+?^$|\]\.\\]/g, '\\$&') + ']');

  const r =
    mode === 'firstLetter'
      ? letters
      : mode === 'firstChar'
      ? new RegExp('^' + letters.source)
      : mode === 'firstWord' || mode === 'eachWord'
      ? new RegExp(
          '(' + ws + ')' + letters.source,
          mode === 'eachWord' ? 'g' : undefined
        )
      : undefined;

  if (r) {
    return this.replace(r, (c) => c.toUpperCase());
  } else {
    throw `error: ucFirst invalid mode (${mode}). Parameter should be one of: firstLetter|firstChar|firstWord|eachWord`;
  }
};

console.log("mike o'hara".ucFirst('eachWord', " \t\r\n\f\v'"));
// Mike O'Hara
console.log("mike o'hara".ucFirst('eachWord', /[\s']/));
// Mike O'Hara

2

Here's how you could do it with the map function basically, it does the same as the accepted answer but without the for-loop. Hence, saves you few lines of code.

function titleCase(text) {
  if (!text) return text;
  if (typeof text !== 'string') throw "invalid argument";

  return text.toLowerCase().split(' ').map(value => {
    return value.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + value.substring(1);
  }).join(' ');
}

console.log(titleCase("I'm A little tea pot"));

0
2

A more compact (and modern) rewrite of @somethingthere's proposed solution:

let titleCase = (str => str.toLowerCase().split(' ').map(
                c => c.charAt(0).toUpperCase() + c.substring(1)).join(' '));
    
document.write(titleCase("I'm an even smaller tea pot"));

2

Below is another way to capitalize the first alphabet of each word in a string.

Create a custom method for a String object by using prototype.

String.prototype.capitalize = function() {
    var c = '';
    var s = this.split(' ');
    for (var i = 0; i < s.length; i++) {
        c+= s[i].charAt(0).toUpperCase() + s[i].slice(1) + ' ';
    }
    return c;
}
var name = "john doe";
document.write(name.capitalize());
1

Raw code:

function capi(str) {
    var s2 = str.trim().toLowerCase().split(' ');
    var s3 = [];
    s2.forEach(function(elem, i) {
        s3.push(elem.charAt(0).toUpperCase().concat(elem.substring(1)));
    });
    return s3.join(' ');
}
capi('JavaScript string exasd');
1
  • you should provide a bit more detail (what was the wrong?)
    – hering
    May 16, 2017 at 12:51
1

I used replace() with a regular expression:

function titleCase(str) {

  var newStr = str.toLowerCase().replace(/./, (x) => x.toUpperCase()).replace(/[^']\b\w/g, (y) => y.toUpperCase());

  console.log(newStr);
}

titleCase("I'm a little tea pot")
1

A complete and simple solution goes here:

String.prototype.replaceAt=function(index, replacement) {
        return this.substr(0, index) + replacement+ this.substr(index
  + replacement.length);
}
var str = 'k j g           u              i l  p';
function capitalizeAndRemoveMoreThanOneSpaceInAString() {
    for(let i  = 0; i < str.length-1; i++) {
        if(str[i] === ' ' && str[i+1] !== '')
            str = str.replaceAt(i+1, str[i+1].toUpperCase());
    }
    return str.replaceAt(0, str[0].toUpperCase()).replace(/\s+/g, ' ');
}
console.log(capitalizeAndRemoveMoreThanOneSpaceInAString(str));
1
  • Why do you amend the String.prototype every time this method is called? If anything you need to do it once, and preferably you never touch the prototypes of built-ins. It's a bit of a no-no... Jul 1, 2020 at 18:00
0

Please check the code below.

function titleCase(str) {
  var splitStr = str.toLowerCase().split(' ');
  var nstr = ""; 
  for (var i = 0; i < splitStr.length; i++) {
    nstr +=  (splitStr[i].charAt(0).toUpperCase()+ splitStr[i].slice(1) + " 
    ");
  }
  console.log(nstr);
}

var strng = "this is a new demo for checking the string";
titleCase(strng);
1
  • 2
    Thank you for this code snippet, which might provide some limited, immediate help. A proper explanation would greatly improve its long-term value by showing why this is a good solution to the problem, and would make it more useful to future readers with other, similar questions. Please edit your answer to add some explanation, including the assumptions you've made.
    – iBug
    Jan 10, 2018 at 3:55
0

As of ECMA2017 or ES8

const titleCase = (string) => {
  return string
    .split(' ')
    .map(word => word.substr(0,1).toUpperCase() + word.substr(1,word.length))
    .join(' ');
};

let result = titleCase('test test test');
console.log(result);

Explanation:
1. First, we pass the string "test test test" to our function "titleCase".
2. We split a string on the space basis so the result of first function "split" will be ["test","test","test"]
3. As we got an array, we used map function for manipulation each word in the array. We capitalize the first character and add remaining character to it.
4. In the last, we join the array using space as we split the string by sapce.

2
  • I think you are missing something in the very beginning before splitting and that is toLowerCase().
    – ArchNoob
    Jun 5, 2018 at 0:25
  • @ArchNoob, yes we can add toLowerCase() before split. But its totally depend on use case such as if we want "TeSt Test" output for "teSt test" input, in this case, we can't add toLowerCase(). Jun 5, 2018 at 3:41

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