3

Building a simple expression tree in F#:

type Quote<'T> = 
    static member X(exp:Expression<Func<'T,'a>>) = exp

type T = { x:int }

[<EntryPoint>]
let main argv = 
    for _ in [1..4] do
        let sw = Stopwatch.StartNew()
        [for i in [1..10000] -> Quote.X(fun x -> x.x = i)] |> ignore
        printfn "Elapsed: %A" sw.Elapsed
    0 // return an integer exit code

On both .NET and mono is about x35 slower than this C#:

class Program
{
    class T {public int x {get;set;}}

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        for (var ii = 0; ii < 4; ii++)
        {
            var sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
            Enumerable.Range(0,10000)
                .Select(i => (Expression<Func<T,bool>>)(t => t.x == i ))
                .ToList();
            Console.WriteLine("Ellapsed: {0}", sw.Elapsed);
        }
    }
}

Anyone knows why that is and if there's something I could do to improve it? The solution is on github in case someone wants to try: https://github.com/et1975/ExpressionTrees

  • 1
    Think the C# compiler is smart enough to eliminate the whole loop as the result is not used. Can you see how much they differ when you also sum up the range and output that number to the commandline? – gjvdkamp Sep 15 '15 at 18:11
  • 1
    @gjvdkamp Compiled IL of that C# code doesn't look as it does nothing. – Roman Dibikhin Sep 15 '15 at 19:49
  • @ Eugene These pieces are not equivalent as they seems. F# uses Microsoft.FSharp.Quotations.FSharpExpr inside and C# uses System.Linq.Expressions.Expression. – Roman Dibikhin Sep 15 '15 at 20:08
  • Are you just curious, or do you have an actual scenario where the performance of creating quotations in F# is a problem for you? – kvb Sep 15 '15 at 22:39
  • What about the list comprehension in F# vs Enumerable.Range in C#? Perhaps most of the computation goes to creating the list data structure, not the actual Expression objects? – MisterMetaphor Sep 16 '15 at 0:16
0

You can use System.Linq.Expressions.Expression in F#, but it looks ugly:

open System.Linq.Expressions

let paramExpr:ParameterExpression = Expression.Parameter( typedefof<int>, "asd")

let pList = new System.Collections.Generic.List<ParameterExpression>()
pList.Add(paramExpr)

// This expression represents a lambda expression 
// that adds 1 to the parameter value.
let lambdaExpr:LambdaExpression = 
    Expression.Lambda(
        Expression.Add(paramExpr, Expression.Constant(1)), pList)

[<EntryPoint>]
let main argv = 
    for _ in [1..4] do
        let sw = Stopwatch.StartNew()
        [for i in [1..10000] -> lambdaExpr] |> ignore
        printfn "Elapsed: %A" sw.Elapsed
    0 // return an integer exit code
  • Actually, no. Look closely: F# version uses System.Linq.Expressions.Expression, too. The F# quotation type is called Expr, not Expression, and its generic parameter is F# function, not .NET delegate. – Fyodor Soikin Sep 15 '15 at 23:58
  • If you look at IL of Eugene F# code you can see there is F#'s LeafExpressionConverter converting fun to System.Func<...+T,System.Boolean> and the only usage of Linq.Espressions is call Microsoft.FSharp.Core.CompilerServices.GeneratedSequenceBase<System.Linq.Expressions.Expression<System.Func<...+T,System.Boolean>>>..ctor – Roman Dibikhin Sep 16 '15 at 8:54

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