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Keeping with the festivities of Stackoverflow's new logo design, I was curious what the point of sstk() was supposed to be in BSD and other UNIX-Like operating systems?

According to the Linux kernel system call interface manpages, sstk(2) was supposed to:

...[change] the size of the stack area. The stack area is also automatically extended as needed. On the VAX the text and data areas are adjacent in the P0 region, while the stack section is in the P1 region, and grows downward.

However, also according to the manual:

This call is not supported in 4.3BSD or 4.4BSD or glibc or Linux or any other known Unix-like system. Some systems have a routine of this name that returns ENOSYS.

Which can be noticed by viewing glibc's sstk.c source

My question is, why would one want to manually change the size of the stack? sbrk() and friends make sense, but is there any use in manually re-sizing the stack size in your program manually?

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    The fact that the call is not supported any known where suggests that in fact there isn't much point to it, at least not any more. I would speculate that it made more sense in days when RAM was precious. In those days, you also might not have been able to rely on the stack size being increased automatically. Thus you might, say, enlarge the stack dynamically within a deeply recursive algorithm, and then shrink it back afterward. – John Bollinger Sep 15 '15 at 19:35
  • "According to the Linux kernel API manpages ..." which Kernel man-pages?-) – alk Sep 15 '15 at 19:57
  • @JohnBollinger: Just make this an answer. – alk Sep 15 '15 at 19:57
  • @alk I was taking a look at linux.die.net/man/2/sstk It does, however, reference the 4.3BSD Architecture Manual for a description of the function. – joshumax Sep 15 '15 at 20:05
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    @alk Yeah, looking at a changelog for man-pages 2.06 (man7.org/linux/man-pages/changelog.html), it seems that before that release there was a manual entry for it, but was removed thereafter. I was just curious what it's supposed point was to be as I can't find anything about it in the POSIX spec, that's all – joshumax Sep 15 '15 at 20:15
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Another plausible reason for explicitly growing the stack with a syscall would be so you can get a clean error indication if the request is too big, as opposed to the normal method of handling stack allocation failures (i.e. don't even try, if any allocation fails, just let the process crash).

It will be hard to know exactly how much stack space you need to perform some recursive operation, but you could make a reasonable guess and sstk(guess*10) just to be sure.

  • That actually makes a lot of sense. I suppose we'll never know the true reason for its creation but this answer seems to be the most plausible one. – joshumax Sep 15 '15 at 21:14
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As I first expressed in comments, the fact that the call is not supported any-known-where suggests that in fact there isn't much point to it, at least not any more.

The docs on linux.die.net attribute the function's heritage to BSD (though it's apparently not supported in modern BSD any more than it is anywhere else), and BSD traces its lineage to bona fide AT&T Unix. It may have made more sense in days when RAM was precious. In those days, you also might not have been able to rely on the stack size being increased automatically. Thus you might, say, enlarge the stack dynamically within a deeply recursive algorithm, and then shrink it back afterward.

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