5

I've always created rectangles with outlines like this (using Graphics(2D)):

g.setColor(aColor);
g.fillRect(x, y, width, height);
g.setColor(anotherColor);
g.drawRect(x, y, width, height);

This works fine, except with some colors like Color.BLUE. There are lines that don't have the same thickness:

enter image description here

May be hard to see on the first sight, but if you look closely you will realize that the left line is too thick and the right line is too thin. This happens also with other colors, just not so obviously: (I'm still not sure if this happens with cyan, can't exactly tell)

enter image description here

I can't make sense of this because the black line is just being drawn onto the inner blue rectangle, the inner rectangle shouldn't have an effect on it. (without fillRect() the lines have even thicknesses)

I've provided an example below that will probably help you see the difference better. My Question: Why is this happening with certain RGB-colors and how do I fix it?

import java.awt.BorderLayout;
import java.awt.Color;
import java.awt.EventQueue;
import java.awt.FlowLayout;
import java.awt.Graphics;
import java.awt.GridLayout;
import java.awt.event.ItemEvent;
import java.awt.event.ItemListener;
import java.util.HashMap;

import javax.swing.JComboBox;
import javax.swing.JFrame;
import javax.swing.JPanel;
import javax.swing.JToggleButton;
import javax.swing.WindowConstants;

public class LineExample {

    Color colors[] = new Color[] { Color.BLACK, Color.BLUE, Color.CYAN, Color.DARK_GRAY, Color.GRAY, Color.GREEN,
            Color.LIGHT_GRAY, Color.MAGENTA, Color.ORANGE, Color.PINK, Color.RED, Color.WHITE, Color.YELLOW };
    String colorNames[] = new String[] { "Black", "Blue", "Cyan", "Dark Gray", "Gray", "Green", "Light Gray", "Magenta",
            "Orange", "Pink", "Red", "White", "Yellow" };
    HashMap<String, Color> hashMap = new HashMap<String, Color>();
    Color currentColor = colors[2];

    public LineExample() {

        fillHashMap(hashMap);

        JFrame frame = new JFrame();

        JPanel mainPanel = new JPanel(new BorderLayout());
        JPanel northPanel = new JPanel(new FlowLayout());
        JPanel centerPanel = new JPanel(new GridLayout(1, 2));
        CustomPanel customPanel = new CustomPanel();
        BluePanel bluePanel = new BluePanel();

        JComboBox<String> comboBox = new JComboBox<String>();
        addItems(comboBox);
        comboBox.addItemListener(new ItemListener() {
            @Override
            public void itemStateChanged(ItemEvent e) {
                currentColor = hashMap.get(comboBox.getSelectedItem());
                centerPanel.repaint();
            }
        });

        JToggleButton toggleButton = new JToggleButton("Switch");
        toggleButton.addItemListener(new ItemListener() {
            @Override
            public void itemStateChanged(ItemEvent e) {
                centerPanel.removeAll();
                if (e.getStateChange() == ItemEvent.SELECTED) {
                    centerPanel.add(bluePanel);
                    centerPanel.add(customPanel);
                } else if (e.getStateChange() == ItemEvent.DESELECTED) {
                    centerPanel.add(customPanel);
                    centerPanel.add(bluePanel);
                }
                centerPanel.revalidate();
                centerPanel.repaint();
            }
        });

        northPanel.add(comboBox);
        northPanel.add(toggleButton);
        centerPanel.add(customPanel);
        centerPanel.add(bluePanel);
        mainPanel.add(northPanel, BorderLayout.NORTH);
        mainPanel.add(centerPanel, BorderLayout.CENTER);

        frame.setContentPane(mainPanel);

        frame.setDefaultCloseOperation(WindowConstants.EXIT_ON_CLOSE);
        frame.setSize(250, 250);
        frame.setVisible(true);

    }

    public void addItems(JComboBox<String> comboBox) {
        for (int i = 0; i < colors.length; i++) {
            comboBox.addItem(colorNames[i]);
        }
        comboBox.setSelectedIndex(2);
    }

    public void fillHashMap(HashMap<String, Color> hashmap) {
        for (int i = 0; i < colors.length; i++) {
            hashMap.put(colorNames[i], colors[i]);
        }
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        EventQueue.invokeLater(new Runnable() {
            @Override
            public void run() {
                new LineExample();
            }
        });
    }

    public class BluePanel extends JPanel {
        @Override
        public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
            super.paintComponent(g);
            int width = 100;
            int height = 100;
            int x = ((this.getWidth() - width) / 2);
            int y = ((this.getHeight() - height) / 2);
            g.setColor(Color.BLUE);
            g.fillRect(x, y, width, height);
            g.setColor(Color.BLACK);
            g.drawRect(x, y, width, height);
        }
    }

    public class CustomPanel extends JPanel {
        @Override
        public void paintComponent(Graphics g) {
            super.paintComponent(g);
            int width = 100;
            int height = 100;
            int x = ((this.getWidth() - width) / 2);
            int y = ((this.getHeight() - height) / 2);
            g.setColor(currentColor);
            g.fillRect(x, y, width, height);
            g.setColor(Color.BLACK);
            g.drawRect(x, y, width, height);
        }
    }

}
  • the left line is too thick and the right line is too thin. - I always see a 1 pixel black line. I took a screen print and loaded the image into MS Paint and zoomed in. I also loaded your posted image into Paint. Even your image is 1 pixel. So I'm not sure what you are describing. – camickr Sep 15 '15 at 21:31
  • When you save the image, and have a look at it in some image viewer, and then zoom in, you will notice that the left and the right border are both exactly one pixel wide. What you see there (I don't really see it, by the way) is almost certainly the effect that is also described here: graphicdesign.stackexchange.com/questions/42306/… – Marco13 Sep 15 '15 at 21:34
8

This is an interesting problem that arises because of subpixel arrangements in LCD displays. I took some pictures of my monitor with my phone to explain this effect.

First we look at the left side. The line appears to be around 2 pixels thick. This is due to the fact that going left to right on the line is a black to blue transition. Since red and green pixels can't be illuminated for the colour blue, we have to wait until the next blue subpixel after the line is supposed to end.

enter image description here

Then we look at the right side. This line is approximately 1 pixel thick. This time it's a black to white transition, so the red and green pixels can be illuminated right after the line.

enter image description here

This problem arises as the Java graphics library is not subpixel aware (at least for shapes). You'll always have this problem for some combination of colours on every monitor. It'll be most apparent for the red green blue primary colours, which is why it's hard to tell in your cyan example.

  • Very impressive -- thanks and 1+ (wish I could vote 100+). – Hovercraft Full Of Eels Sep 15 '15 at 21:38
  • 2
    @HovercraftFullOfEels Consider a bounty ;-) – Marco13 Sep 15 '15 at 21:42
  • 1
    I guess my eyesight isn't good enough to see this problem (or does this not happen on all LCD screens?). Good to know it exists (1+). – camickr Sep 15 '15 at 21:47
  • 1
    @camickr The strength of the effect will depend on the Pixel Geometry, although I think that "usually", LCD computer screens should have the "stripes" arrangement, and so the effect should be visible (but likely is less noticable with higher resolutions) – Marco13 Sep 15 '15 at 21:55
0

Could be related to antialiasing? When I face these kind of problems I usually do something like...

Graphics2D g2 = (Graphics2D)g;
g2d.setRenderingHint(RenderingHints.KEY_ANTIALIASING, RenderingHints.VALUE_ANTIALIAS_ON);

// draw stuff

g2d.setRenderingHint(RenderingHints.KEY_ANTIALIASING, RenderingHints.VALUE_ANTIALIAS_DEFAULT);
  • I already tried that before, didn't work. Please note that you can try it yourself with my example first. – Lukas Rotter Sep 15 '15 at 21:23

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