31

I have a class named WhatClass that has List field in it. I need to be able to read-only this field, so I used a get property to expose it to other objects.

public class WhatClass
{
    List<SomeOtherClass> _SomeOtherClassItems;

    public List<SomeOtherClass> SomeOtherClassItems { get { return _SomeOtherClassItems; } }
}

However it turns out that any object can call

WhatClass.SomeOtherClassItems.Add(item);

How can I prevent this?

7 Answers 7

40

As others have said, you are looking for the .AsReadOnly() extension method.

However, you should store a reference to the collection instead of creating it during each property access:

private readonly List<SomeOtherClass> _items;

public WhatClass()
{
    _items = new List<SomeOtherClass>();

    this.Items = _items.AsReadOnly();
}

public ReadOnlyCollection<SomeOtherClass> Items { get; private set; }

This is to ensure that x.Items == x.Items holds true, which could otherwise be very unexpected for API consumers.

Exposing ReadOnlyCollection<> communicates your intent of a read-only collection to consumers. Changes to _items will be reflected in Items.

4
  • You might want to elaborate for the masses what happens when you add to _items and how you deal with that... Commented Jul 15, 2010 at 22:56
  • 2
    @Dave - The docs state that changes will be reflected in the wrapper. Commented Jul 15, 2010 at 22:56
  • Bryan, thank you very much for this answer, although I do not need a readonly keyword here. Commented Jul 15, 2010 at 23:07
  • 1
    @Witchunter: you aren't assigning _items after the constructor; the readonly keyword communicates that intent: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/acdd6hb7.aspx. If you plan on assigning another value to _items after WhatClass is constructed, you will also need to reassign the Items property. Commented Jul 16, 2010 at 1:20
8

You're looking for the ReadOnlyCollection<T> class, which is a read-only wrapper around an IList<T>.

Since the ReadOnlyCollection<T> will reflect changes in the underlying list, you don't need to create a new instance every time.

For example:

public class WhatClass {
    public WhatClass() {
        _SomeOtherClassItems = new List<SomeOtherClass>();
        SomeOtherClassItems = _SomeOtherClassItems.AsReadOnly();
    }

    List<SomeOtherClass> _SomeOtherClassItems;

    public ReadOnlyCollection<SomeOtherClass> SomeOtherClassItems { get; private set; }
}
1
  • Thank you for your answer. You mentioned ReadOnlyCollection<T> class, but didn't include it in the code, but I've figured it out. Thank you once again. Commented Jul 15, 2010 at 23:08
6

Use List<T>.AsReadOnly:

public ReadOnlyCollection<SomeOtherClass> SomeOtherClassItems
{
    get
    {
        return _SomeOtherClassItems.AsReadOnly();
    }
}

This will return a ReadOnlyCollection, which will throw an exception if a client calls Add through the interface. In addition, the ReadOnlyCollection type does not expose a public Add method.

4
  • 6
    Don't make a new instance each time.
    – SLaks
    Commented Jul 15, 2010 at 22:52
  • 1
    @SLaks: I see your point, but that's a micro-optimization and I believe it's easier to read this way. ReadOnlyCollection is small and the GC is good at dealing with small short-lived objects, and you're just as likely to wind up using more memory by adding a field and a ReadOnlyCollection object that you don't need for every one of your classes. Commented Jul 15, 2010 at 22:59
  • 2
    Allocating objects in a property getter is a bad idea. People generally assume that a accessing a property getter is nothing more than a memory read, and will therefore access the property many times in large nested loops.
    – SLaks
    Commented Jul 15, 2010 at 23:03
  • @SLaks: Never mind, I see the argument about reference equality in Bryan's answer. I hadn't considered that. Commented Jul 15, 2010 at 23:04
3

How about using AsReadOnly()? - MSDN Documentation

0
2

List<T> implements IReadOnlyList<T> since .NET Framework 4.5, so an internal list can be exposed as IReadOnlyList<T> instead for that purpose.

public class WhatClass
{
    List<SomeOtherClass> _SomeOtherClassItems;

    public IReadOnlyList<SomeOtherClass> SomeOtherClassItems => _SomeOtherClassItems;
}
0

You can just use ToList() to return a copy of the list instead. Other classes can do what they like to the copy it won't alter your original list.

You should make it clear in the name that they are getting a copy.

using System.Linq;

public class WhatClass
{
    List<SomeOtherClass> _SomeOtherClassItems;

    public List<SomeOtherClass> SomeOtherClassItems { get { return _SomeOtherClassItems.ToList(); } }
}
0

Although others have pointed out the use of ReadOnlyCollection, it's worth noting that there also exists a cool ReadOnlyObservableCollection. It can be really useful in bindings and view models. As pointed here:

This class is a read-only wrapper around an ObservableCollection. If changes are made to the underlying collection, the ReadOnlyObservableCollection reflects those changes. To be notified of the changes to this class, subscribe to the CollectionChanged or PropertyChanged event.

You can simply expose this ReadOnlyObservableCollection and make changes to the underlying collection and rest assured that your view is getting updated.

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