2

I have found this

But that does not work for packages defined inside other modules like:

$cat mail.pl
{
package Hi::Test;
}    

my $rc =  eval{ require Hi::Test };

$rc is false here.

How can I check that 'Hi::Test' is available?

  • Yup i got it..removing my comments – prashant thakre Sep 16 '15 at 12:30
2

You want something like defined(*Hi::Test::), except that simply mentioning *Hi::Test:: creates the package.

$ perl -E'
   say defined(*Hi::Test::) ? "exists" : "doesn'\''t exist";
'
exists

By using symbolic references, you avoid that problem.

$ perl -E'
   { package Hi::Test }
   say defined(*{"Hi::Test::"}) ? "exists" : "doesn'\''t exist";
   say defined(*{"Hi::TEST::"}) ? "exists" : "doesn'\''t exist";
'
exists
doesn't exist

Putting that code in a sub to makes things cleaner.

$ perl -E'
   use strict;
   use warnings;

   sub test_for_package {
      my ($pkg_name) = @_;
      $pkg_name .= "::";
      return defined(*$pkg_name);
   }

   { package Hi::Test }
   say test_for_package("Hi::Test") ? "exists" : "doesn'\''t exist";
   say test_for_package("Hi::TEST") ? "exists" : "doesn'\''t exist";
'
exists
doesn't exist

Note that creating the package Foo::Bar::Baz also creates the packages Foo and Foo::Bar.

  • There seems a bug in perl when eval 'require Some::Pkg' which spoil global namespace. rt.perl.org/Ticket/Display.html?id=126077 – Eugen Konkov Sep 17 '15 at 6:35
  • strange, but no strict qw( refs ); is not required in last example... – Eugen Konkov Sep 17 '15 at 8:10
  • @Eugen Konkov, Yes, as mentioned, referencing Some::Pkg creates the package, so require Some::Pkg creates the package, even if it eventually throws an exception. – ikegami Sep 17 '15 at 15:48
  • @Eugen Konkov, Interesting. no strict qw( refs ); is indeed not required. Fixed. – ikegami Sep 17 '15 at 15:48
  • I think that is due to 'defined' which does not produce error – Eugen Konkov Sep 17 '15 at 16:21
3

I'm assuming there is actually something happening in that package, and not just an empty block.

The following code checks if there are any entries in the symbol table for that package. It's dirty, but it works as long as there are subs or package variables registered.

{
  package Hi::Test;

  sub foo;
}

my $rc =  eval{ require Hi::Test };
if (! $rc) {
  $rc = do {
    no strict;
    *stash = *{"Hi::Test::"};
    scalar keys %stash;
  }
}

print $rc;

It will print 1.

  • 1
    defined(*{"Hi::Test::"}) is sufficient. – ikegami Sep 16 '15 at 17:44
1

I'm a little rusty on this, but I think your require will be failing regardless - this errors:

#!/usr/bin/perl

{
    package Hi::Test;

    sub foo {
        print "bar\n";
    }
}

{
    package main;
    require Hi::Test; 
}

This errors - it can't find it @INC (because it isn't in @INC). Both use and require specifically tell perl to "go out and find a module file"

But you can still call 'foo' with:

Hi::Test::foo();

So you can't test the loading of the module with eval nor can you check %INC .

But what you can do is check %Hi:::

use Data::Dumper;
print Dumper \%Hi::;
print Dumper \%Hi::Test::;

Which gives us:

$VAR1 = {
          'Test::' => *{'Hi::Test::'}
        };
$VAR1 = {
          'foo' => *Hi::Test::foo
        };

So we can:

print "Is loaded" if defined $Hi::{'Test::'}
0

UPDATED
I have found this clue:

my $module =  *main::;
my @sub_name =  split '::', $full_name;
while( each @sub_name ) {
    $module =  $$module{ $sub_name[$_].'::' };
}
print "Module is available"   if $module;

In compare to this answer it does not create additional variable in global stash

  • Please attribute where you have found that. – simbabque Sep 16 '15 at 13:49
  • this can be found in perlmod - each package has a magic hash called %packagename:: So you can do print Dumper \%main:: - or in this example: print Dumper \$main::{'Hi::'}; giving $VAR1 = \*{'::Hi::'};. What you can't do is: print Dumper \$main::{'Hi::Test::'}; – Sobrique Sep 16 '15 at 13:54
  • %::, %main::, %main::main:: and %main::main::main:: are all the same namespace. I'd drop the main from your code. – ikegami Sep 16 '15 at 17:35

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