4

Now as far as I know mutex used for syncing all the thread which are sharing same data by following a principle that when one thread is using that data all other thread should be blocked while using that common resource until it is unlocked...now recently in a blogpost I have seen a code explaining this concept and some people wrote that blocking all the threads while one thread is accessing the resources is a very bad idea and it goes against the concept of threading which is true somehow.. Then my question is how to synchronize threads without blocking?

Here is the link of that blogpost

http://www.thegeekstuff.com/2012/05/c-mutex-examples/

  • 2
    Mutexes don't block all threads; they only block the threads trying to acquire the mutex. – Colonel Thirty Two Sep 16 '15 at 15:06
  • 1
    That is what I meant... – Mayukh Sarkar Sep 16 '15 at 15:07
  • Rethink your application's design? – alk Sep 16 '15 at 15:07
  • The entire point of mutexes is so that only one thread accesses a resource at a time. If there's a ton of shared state that each thread needs to access exclusively, then threading isn't appropriate. – Colonel Thirty Two Sep 16 '15 at 15:08
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    The easiest way to avoid blocking is to avoid sharing data between threads. This may entail some otherwise unnecessary data copying so that each thread has a private copy. But in general, this topic is far too big for a single StackO post. Books were written on this. – Seva Alekseyev Sep 16 '15 at 15:09
2

You cannot synchronize threads without blocking by the very definition of synchronization. However, good synchronization technique will limit the scope of where things are blocked to the absolute minimum. To illustrate, and point out exactly why the article is wrong consider the following:

From the article:

pthread_t tid[2];
int counter;
pthread_mutex_t lock;

void* doSomeThing(void *arg)
{
    pthread_mutex_lock(&lock);

    unsigned long i = 0;
    counter += 1;
    printf("\n Job %d started\n", counter);

    for(i=0; i<(0xFFFFFFFF);i++);

    printf("\n Job %d finished\n", counter);

    pthread_mutex_unlock(&lock);

    return NULL;
}

What it should be:

pthread_t tid[2];
int counter;
pthread_mutex_t lock;

void* doSomeThing(void *arg)
{
    unsigned long i = 0;

    pthread_mutex_lock(&lock);
    counter += 1;
    int myJobNumber = counter;
    pthread_mutex_unlock(&lock);

    printf("\n Job %d started\n", myJobNumber);

    for(i=0; i<(0xFFFFFFFF);i++);

    printf("\n Job %d finished\n", myJobNumber);

    return NULL;
}

Notice that in the article, the work being done (the pointless for loop) is done while holding the lock. This is complete nonsense, since the work is supposed to be done concurrently. The reason the lock is needed is only to protect the counter variable. Thus the threads only need to hold the lock when changing that variable as in the second example.

Mutex locks protect the critical section of code, which are those areas of code which only 1 thread at a time should touch - and all the other threads must block if trying to access the critical section at the same time. However, if thread 1 is in the critical section, and thread 2 is not, then it's perfectly fine for both to run concurrently.

  • You do not need a mutex AT ALL here. Meaning, you can achieve the same functionality without mutexes, and might ot might not be beneficial. But at least you should've mentioned it. – SergeyA Sep 16 '15 at 15:27
  • @SergeyA I am trying to explain where the article in question went wrong, as per the intent of the question as I understood it, not rewrite the article. Please submit your own answer if you have something constructive to add. – Jim Wood Sep 16 '15 at 15:33
  • @JimWood, your correction in the code is wrong, "counter" is a shared variable between threads and both printf use that variable, it must be locked. For it to be correct the current job counter should be stored in a local variable before unlocking the counter so the work (the for loop) could be parallelized correctly and print the right counter ... pthread_mutex_lock(&lock); counter += 1; int aux = counter; pthread_mutex_unlock(&lock); printf("\n Job %d started\n", aux); for(i=0; i<(0xFFFFFFFF);i++); printf("\n Job %d finished\n", aux); return NULL; } – Mr. E Sep 16 '15 at 21:00
  • @Emi1305 Thanks. Edited to reflect your suggested changes. – Jim Wood Sep 18 '15 at 18:42
1

The term you are looking for is lock free data structures.

General idea is that the state shared between threads is contorted into one of those.

Implementations of those vary and often are compiler or platform specific. For example MSVC has a set of _Interlocked* functions to perform simple atomic operations.

  • Note that these generally perform worse than the corresponding locking data structures, so they're rarely used. However, if you happen to be in one of the rare cases where they perform better, sometimes much better, they can be very valuable. – David Schwartz Sep 18 '15 at 18:45
1

blocking all the threads while one thread is accessing the resources is a very bad idea and it goes against the concept of threading which is true somehow

This is a fallacy. Locks block only contending threads, allowing all non-contending threads to run concurrently. Running the work that's the most efficient to run at any particular time rather than forcing any particular ordering is not against the concept of threading at all.

Now if so many of your threads contend so badly that blocking contending threads is harming performance, there are two possibilities:

  1. Most likely you have a very poor design and you should fix it. Don't blame the locks for a high-contention design.

  2. You are in the rare case where other synchronization mechanisms are more appropriate (such as lock-free collections). But this requires significant expertise and analysis of the specific use case to find the best solution.

Generally, if your use case is a perfect fit for atomics, use them. Otherwise, mutexes (possibly in combination with condition variables) should be your first thought. That will cover 99% of the cases a typical multi-threaded C programmer will face.

0

You can use pthread_mutex_trylock() to attempt a lock. If that fails then you know you would have blocked. You can't do what you want to do, but your thread is not blocked, so it can attempt to do something else. I think most of the comments on that blog are about avoiding contention between threads though, i.e. that maximising multi-threaded performance is about avoiding threads working on the same resource at the same time. If you avoid that by design then by design you don't need locks as you never have contention.

  • I was designing a TCP/IP sever where multiple clients will communicate with server to send data to each other..now in this case for each client if I create a separate thread which will receive data from its client and send to other client but if not data is sent by that client, the server thread serving that client which has a read system call will block till it receives the data again..here how can I use trylock..or any other mechanism which will be efficient and concurrent too – Mayukh Sarkar Sep 16 '15 at 15:25
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    Be careful when using trylock -- if resource is contested enough, some threads will never get a chance to run. Basically loudest thread (the one who tries more often) would dominate. If you have readers and writers for example, you could get an effective deadlock or overflow of your buffers without anybody ever waiting on a mutex. :) – Eugene Sep 16 '15 at 15:31
  • read doesn't have to block either, if you don't want it to... – Joe Sep 16 '15 at 15:34
  • Fundamentally you're asking the SO community to redesign your application to be lockless. Which is rather too wide a subject to answer! – Joe Sep 16 '15 at 15:35
  • @joe I never had a problem with locks but when I saw that it is not a good practise to always lock all the resources...I am exploring some other options too – Mayukh Sarkar Sep 16 '15 at 15:45
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There are a number of tricks that can be used to avoid concurrent bottle necks.

  1. Immutable Data Structures. The idea here is that concurrent reads are okay, but writes are not. To implement something like this you basically need to think of business units as factories to these immutable data structures which are used by other business units.
  2. Asynchronous-Callbacks. This is the essence of event-driven development. If you have concurrent tasks, use the observer pattern to execute some logic when a resource becomes available. Basically we execute some code up until a shared resource is needed then add a listener for when the resource becomes available. This typically results in less readable code and heaver strain on the stack, but you never block a thread waiting on a resource. If you have the tasks ready to keep the CPUs running hot, this pattern will do it for you.

Even with these tools, you'll never completely remove the need for some synchronization (counters come to mind).

  • How do you imagine the event generator and the listener communicate? For example, if the listener checks for a message at precisely the same instant the event generator is queuing an event, why would you think one wouldn't block? – David Schwartz Sep 18 '15 at 20:37
  • I suppose you're right, threads could briefly block while queuing tasks. – Isaiah van der Elst Sep 18 '15 at 20:52

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