0

I'm struggling with writing a method that deletes a node that contains a string from a linked list. Here's what I have.

struct node { 

    char name[128];
    struct node *next; 
};

struct node *list_delete(const char *name, struct node *list) {

    if (list->next == NULL && strcmp(name, head_name) == 0) {

        struct node *temp = list;
        list = list->next;
        free(temp);
        return list;
    }
    struct node *head = malloc(sizeof(struct node));
    head = list; 
    while (head->next != NULL) {
        if (strcmp(name, head->name) == 0) {
            struct node *temp = head;
            head = head->next;
            free(temp);
            break;
        } 
        head = head->next;
    }
    return list; 
}

When I run this, I get the error:

double free or corruption (!prev)

I'm looking to see whether I'm freeing where I'm not supposed to, but I think I have it. I'm also new to C, so I'm still learning.

  • 1
    Unrelated: struct node *head = malloc(sizeof(struct node)); leaks because you assign head to a different pointer immediately afterwards. – Colonel Thirty Two Sep 17 '15 at 3:50
  • This code is incomplete. head_name isn't declared. – Olipro Sep 17 '15 at 3:54
  • 1
    if (list->next == NULL && strcmp(name, head_name) == 0) { // What if list is NULL – u__ Sep 17 '15 at 4:02
0

Without seeing the code that calls this it looks like you will probably have a problem with the last return return list; If the first item was free'd you would be returning a pointer to that recently freed memory and could potentially free it again.

0

What you have is a forward-linked list. Therefore, when deleting, you need to maintain a pointer to the item directly preceeding the deletion target. Since your delete function returns a pointer, I'm going to assume that this returns the new head (or the current one if the target element isn't the head).

I should point out that my example below has the caveat that it only deletes the first occurrence and does not handle multiple elements with the same name. If you need handling for that, all you need to do is encase the existing while loop in a while(1) and replace the last 2 return head; statements with a continue;

struct node *list_delete(const char *name, struct node *list) {
    struct node* prev = NULL;
    struct node* head = list;
    while (list) {
        if (!strcmp(list->name, name))
            break;
        prev = list;
        list = list->next;
    }
    if (!list)
        return head; //not found, no change.
    if (!prev) { //element to destroy is first one
        head = list->next;
        free(list);
        return head;
    }
    prev->next = list->next; //make previous skip target
    free(list); //destroy found element
    return head; //head unchanged
}
0

I personally feel its better of having a couple of pointers to keep track of the list traversal.

struct node *list_delete(const char *name, struct node *list) {
        struct node *cur = NULL, *nxt = NULL;


        if( list ) { /** Valid List **/
                cur = list;
                nxt = list->next;
                while( nxt ) {  /** Next Pointer Exists **/
                        if ( strcmp( name, nxt->name ) == 0 )  { /** and Next node is what we are looking for **/
                                cur->next = nxt->next; /**  Skip Next Node **/
                                nxt->next = NULL; /** Detach It **/
                                free(nxt); /** Free it **/
                                return list;     /** Return list **/     
                        }
                        nxt = nxt->next; /** Go on further **/
                        cur = cur->next;                                
                }

                if ( strcmp( name, cur->name ) == 0 ) { /** will handle single node case **/
                        free( cur );
                        return NULL;
                }
        }

    return NULL; 
}
  • 1
    Note that by the time you check whether the list is valid, you've already crashed if the list is invalid because you dereferenced it in the assignment to nxt in the declaration. The variables should be defined and assigned in the block of the if statement. – Jonathan Leffler Sep 17 '15 at 5:09
  • @JonathanLeffler Thanks for quick review – u__ Sep 17 '15 at 5:36
0

Do some changes to your code. Remember that there should be no leave out in your if-else branches.

PASSED in my NetBeans env.

First of all, please DO NOT DIRECTLY EDIT THE HEAD NODE!!!

Cause this is really a bad manner in practices.

Also I think typedef is a better choice when you want to define a struct.

typedef struct node { 

    char name[128];
    struct node *next; 
}Node;

Node *deleteNode(const char *name, Node *head) {
    /*
     * Give one recommendation:You'd better use
     * a temp pointer instead of using the input
     * parameter directly.There is no rule for 
     * this, but I think it's a good code manner.
     */
    Node *ptr = head;
    Node *nxt;
    if(ptr == NULL)
        return head;
    /*
     * If the head node meet the requirement.
     */
    else if(strcmp(ptr->name,name) == 0){
        head = head->next;
        free(ptr);
    }
    else{
        /*
         * Search from the second Node in the List.
         */
        while(ptr->next != NULL){
            /*
             * Using a temp Node pointer.
             * So you could free the mateched Node.
             */
            nxt = ptr->next;
            if(strcmp(nxt->name,name) == 0){
                ptr->next = nxt->next;
                free(nxt);
                break;
            }
            else{
                ptr = ptr->next;
                continue;
            }
        }
        return head;
    }
}

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.