27

I have a batch file that computes a variable via a series of intermediate variables:

@echo off
setlocal

set base=compute directory
set pkg=compute sub-directory
set scripts=%base%\%pkg%\Scripts

endlocal

%scripts%\activate.bat

The script on the last line isn't called, because it comes after endlocal, which clobbers the scripts environment variable, but it has to come after endlocal because its purpose is to set a bunch of other environment variables for use by the user.

How do I call a script who's purpose is to set permanent environment variables, but who's location is determined by a temporary environment variable?

I know I can create a temporary batch file before endlocal and call it after endlocal, which I will do if nothing else comes to light, but I would like to know if there is a less cringe-worthy solution.

  • 3
    I love all the answers below that show how to handle all kinds of edge cases that will not come into play with your specific question. (Your end result must be a legal directory, so it is unlikely to have ! or ; or other meta-character oddities.) It shows we all care more about teaching than merely breezing quickly through an answer. And that, my friends, is StackOverflow. – Jesse Chisholm Jul 21 '15 at 20:42
  • I answered this by using the reg.exe and volatile registry here: stackoverflow.com/questions/26246151/… – mosh Jul 28 '17 at 13:32
  • Interestingly, I suspect the called script only need to reference its own path, IE, "Activate.bat" needs to know where it was called from, and use that variable assigned as "Scripts" for future calls inside itself. – Ben Personick Nov 16 '17 at 15:23
  • So for a stand-alone script that may have to call other scripts inside its directory, you could easily use the %0 argument, which is an implicitly defined argument of any script called. So to get the path to where it is running a script would use %~p0. – Ben Personick Nov 16 '17 at 15:26
  • Since we know script "Activate.bat" is running in the path defined in your other variables, it is safe to conclude it can set the scripts variable to its own path. (IE in Activate.bat you would run [code]SET "scripts=%~p0"[/code] at the top) – Ben Personick Nov 16 '17 at 15:30
25

The ENDLOCAL & SET VAR=%TEMPVAR% pattern is classic. But there are situations where it is not ideal.

If you do not know the contents of TEMPVAR, then you might run into problems if the value contains special characters like < > & or|. You can generally protect against that by using quotes like SET "VAR=%TEMPVAR%", but that can cause problems if there are special characters and the value is already quoted.

A FOR expression is an excellent choice to transport a value across the ENDLOCAL barrier if you are concerned about special characters. Delayed expansion should be enabled before the ENDLOCAL, and disabled after the ENDLOCAL.

setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
set "TEMPVAR=This & "that ^& the other thing"
for /f "delims=" %%A in (""!TEMPVAR!"") do endlocal & set "VAR=%%~A"

Limitations:

  • If delayed expansion is enabled after the ENDLOCAL, then the final value will be corrupted if the TEMPVAR contained !.

  • values containing a lineFeed character cannot be transported

If you must return multiple values, and you know of a character that cannot appear in either value, then simply use the appropriate FOR /F options. For example, if I know that the values cannot contain |:

setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
set "temp1=val1"
set "temp2=val2"
for /f "tokens=1,2 delims=|" %%A in (""!temp1!"|"!temp2!"") do (
   endLocal
   set "var1=%%~A"
   set "var2=%%~B"
)

If you must return multiple values, and the character set is unrestricted, then use nested FOR /F loops:

setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
set "temp1=val1"
set "temp2=val2"
for /f "delims=" %%A in (""!temp1!"") do (
  for /f "delims=" %%B in (""!temp2!"") do (
    endlocal
    set "var1=%%~A"
    set "var2=%%~B"
  )
)

Definitely check out jeb's answer for a safe, bullet proof technique that works for all possible values in all situations.

2017-08-21 - New function RETURN.BAT
I've worked with DosTips user jeb to develop a batch utility called RETURN.BAT that can be used to exit from a script or called routine and return one or more variables across the ENDLOCAL barrier. Very cool :-)

Below is version 3.0 of the code. I most likely will not keep this code up-to-date. Best to follow the link to make sure you get the latest version, and to see some example usage.

RETURN.BAT

::RETURN.BAT Version 3.0
@if "%~2" equ "" (goto :return.special) else goto :return
:::
:::call RETURN  ValueVar  ReturnVar  [ErrorCode]
:::  Used by batch functions to EXIT /B and safely return any value across the
:::  ENDLOCAL barrier.
:::    ValueVar  = The name of the local variable containing the return value.
:::    ReturnVar = The name of the variable to receive the return value.
:::    ErrorCode = The returned ERRORLEVEL, defaults to 0 if not specified.
:::
:::call RETURN "ValueVar1 ValueVar2 ..." "ReturnVar1 ReturnVar2 ..." [ErrorCode]
:::  Same as before, except the first and second arugments are quoted and space
:::  delimited lists of variable names.
:::
:::  Note that the total length of all assignments (variable names and values)
:::  must be less then 3.8k bytes. No checks are performed to verify that all
:::  assignments fit within the limit. Variable names must not contain space,
:::  tab, comma, semicolon, caret, asterisk, question mark, or exclamation point.
:::
:::call RETURN  init
:::  Defines return.LF and return.CR variables. Not required, but should be
:::  called once at the top of your script to improve performance of RETURN.
:::
:::return /?
:::  Displays this help
:::
:::return /V
:::  Displays the version of RETURN.BAT
:::
:::
:::RETURN.BAT was written by Dave Benham and DosTips user jeb, and was originally
:::posted within the folloing DosTips thread:
:::  http://www.dostips.com/forum/viewtopic.php?f=3&t=6496
:::
::==============================================================================
::  If the code below is copied within a script, then the :return.special code
::  can be removed, and your script can use the following calls:
::
::    call :return   ValueVar  ReturnVar  [ErrorCode]
::
::    call :return.init
::

:return  ValueVar  ReturnVar  [ErrorCode]
:: Safely returns any value(s) across the ENDLOCAL barrier. Default ErrorCode is 0
setlocal enableDelayedExpansion
if not defined return.LF call :return.init
if not defined return.CR call :return.init
set "return.normalCmd="
set "return.delayedCmd="
set "return.vars=%~2"
for %%a in (%~1) do for /f "tokens=1*" %%b in ("!return.vars!") do (
  set "return.normal=!%%a!"
  if defined return.normal (
    set "return.normal=!return.normal:%%=%%3!"
    set "return.normal=!return.normal:"=%%4!"
    for %%C in ("!return.LF!") do set "return.normal=!return.normal:%%~C=%%~1!"
    for %%C in ("!return.CR!") do set "return.normal=!return.normal:%%~C=%%2!"
    set "return.delayed=!return.normal:^=^^^^!"
  ) else set "return.delayed="
  if defined return.delayed call :return.setDelayed
  set "return.normalCmd=!return.normalCmd!&set "%%b=!return.normal!"^!"
  set "return.delayedCmd=!return.delayedCmd!&set "%%b=!return.delayed!"^!"
  set "return.vars=%%c"
)
set "err=%~3"
if not defined err set "err=0"
for %%1 in ("!return.LF!") do for /f "tokens=1-3" %%2 in (^"!return.CR! %% "") do (
  (goto) 2>nul
  (goto) 2>nul
  if "^!^" equ "^!" (%return.delayedCmd:~1%) else %return.normalCmd:~1%
  if %err% equ 0 (call ) else if %err% equ 1 (call) else cmd /c exit %err%
)

:return.setDelayed
set "return.delayed=%return.delayed:!=^^^!%" !
exit /b

:return.special
@if /i "%~1" equ "init" goto return.init
@if "%~1" equ "/?" (
  for /f "tokens=* delims=:" %%A in ('findstr "^:::" "%~f0"') do @echo(%%A
  exit /b 0
)
@if /i "%~1" equ "/V" (
  for /f "tokens=* delims=:" %%A in ('findstr /rc:"^::RETURN.BAT Version" "%~f0"') do @echo %%A
  exit /b 0
)
@>&2 echo ERROR: Invalid call to RETURN.BAT
@exit /b 1


:return.init  -  Initializes the return.LF and return.CR variables
set ^"return.LF=^

^" The empty line above is critical - DO NOT REMOVE
for /f %%C in ('copy /z "%~f0" nul') do set "return.CR=%%C"
exit /b 0
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Btw. The strange syntax is superfluous and it fails with an empty tempvar. Better is FOR /F "delims=" %%A in (""!tempvar!"") do endlocal & set "var=%%~A" – jeb Oct 31 '13 at 11:54
  • 1
    @jeb - How superfluous? If value starts with ;, then it will be skipped. Good idea with the enclosing quotes. Another option is to initialize the value to nothing prior to issuing SETLOCAL, except that can fail if returning multiple values via multiple FOR /F loops. – dbenham Oct 31 '13 at 12:07
  • 1
    As it is, it's not superfluous but versus the double quoted version, as there isn't a problem with the eol character nor empty values. – jeb Oct 31 '13 at 12:10
13
@ECHO OFF  
SETLOCAL  

REM Keep in mind that BAR in the next statement could be anything, including %1, etc.  
SET FOO=BAR  

ENDLOCAL && SET FOO=%FOO%
| improve this answer | |
  • 2
    +1. That's the one. It works because environment variables are expanded while a line is parsed which means that once this line is run, first the endlocal will be executed and the variable in the set afterwards has already been expanded. – Joey Jul 16 '10 at 8:22
  • 3
    But the solution can fail, it depends of the contents in %FOO%, see the answer of dbenham – jeb Nov 24 '11 at 10:42
8

The answer of dbenham is a good solution for "normal" strings, but it fails with exclamation marks ! if delayed expansion is enabled after ENDLOCAL (dbenham said this too).

But it will always fail with some tricky contents like embedded linefeeds,
as the FOR/F will split the content into multiple lines.
This will result into strange behaviour, the endlocal will executed multiple times (for each line feed), so the code isn't bullet proof.

There exists bullet proof solutions, but they are a bit messy :-)
A macro version exists SO:Preserving exclamation ..., to use it is easy, but to read it is ...

Or you could use a code block, you can paste it into your functions.
Dbenham and I developed this technic in the thread Re: new functions: :chr, :asc, :asciiMap,
there are also the explanations for this technic

@echo off
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
cls
for /f %%a in ('copy /Z "%~dpf0" nul') do set "CR=%%a"
set LF=^


rem TWO Empty lines are neccessary
set "original=zero*? %%~A%%~B%%~C%%~L!LF!one&line!LF!two with exclam^! !LF!three with "quotes^&"&"!LF!four with ^^^^ ^| ^< ^> ( ) ^& ^^^! ^"!LF!xxxxxwith CR!CR!five !LF!six with ^"^"Q ^"^"L still six "

setlocal DisableDelayedExpansion
call :lfTest result original

setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
echo The result with disabled delayed expansion is:
if !original! == !result! (echo OK) ELSE echo !result!

call :lfTest result original
echo The result with enabled delayed expansion is:
if !original! == !result! (echo OK) ELSE echo !result!
echo ------------------
echo !original!

goto :eof

::::::::::::::::::::
:lfTest
setlocal
set "NotDelayedFlag=!"
echo(
if defined NotDelayedFlag (echo lfTest was called with Delayed Expansion DISABLED) else echo lfTest was called with Delayed Expansion ENABLED
setlocal EnableDelayedExpansion
set "var=!%~2!"

rem echo the input is:
rem echo !var!
echo(

rem ** Prepare for return
set "var=!var:%%=%%~1!"
set "var=!var:"=%%~2!"
for %%a in ("!LF!") do set "var=!var:%%~a=%%~L!"
for %%a in ("!CR!") do set "var=!var:%%~a=%%~3!"

rem ** It is neccessary to use two IF's else the %var% expansion doesn't work as expected
if not defined NotDelayedFlag set "var=!var:^=^^^^!"
if not defined NotDelayedFlag set "var=%var:!=^^^!%" !

set "replace=%% """ !CR!!CR!"
for %%L in ("!LF!") do (
   for /F "tokens=1,2,3" %%1 in ("!replace!") DO (
     ENDLOCAL
     ENDLOCAL
     set "%~1=%var%" !
     @echo off
      goto :eof
   )
)
exit /b
| improve this answer | |
3

I want to contribute to this too and tell you how you can pass over an array-like set of variables:

@echo off
rem clean up array in current environment:
set "ARRAY[0]=" & set "ARRAY[1]=" & set "ARRAY[2]=" & set "ARRAY[3]="
rem begin environment localisation block here:
setlocal EnableExtensions
rem define an array:
set "ARRAY[0]=1" & set "ARRAY[1]=2" & set "ARRAY[2]=4" & set "ARRAY[3]=8"
rem `set ARRAY` returns all variables starting with `ARRAY`:
for /F "tokens=1,* delims==" %%V in ('set ARRAY') do (
    if defined %%V (
        rem end environment localisation block once only:
        endlocal
    )
    rem re-assign the array, `for` variables transport it:
    set "%%V=%%W"
)
rem this is just for prove:
for /L %%I in (0,1,3) do (
    call echo %%ARRAY[%%I]%%
)
exit /B

The code works, because the very first array element is queried by if defined within the setlocal block where it is actually defined, so endlocal is executed once only. For all the successive loop iterations, the setlocal block is already ended and therefore if defined evaluates to FALSE.

This relies on the fact that at least one array element is assigned, or actually, that there is at least one variable defined whose name starts with ARRAY, within the setlocal/endlocal block. If none exist therein, endlocal is not going to be executed. Outside of the setlocal block, no such variable must be defined, because otherwise, if defined evaluates to TRUE more than once and therefore, endlocal is executed multiple times.

To overcome this restrictions, you can use a flag-like variable, according to this:

  • clear the flag variable, say ARR_FLAG, before the setlocal command: set "ARR_FLAG=";
  • define the flag variable inside of the setlocal/endlocal block, that is, assign a non-empty value to it (immediately before the for /F loop preferrably): set "ARR_FLAG=###";
  • change the if defined command line to: if defined ARR_FLAG (;
  • then you can also do optionally:
    • change the for /F option string to "delims=";
    • change the set command line in the for /F loop to: set "%%V";
| improve this answer | |
1

Something like the following (I haven't tested it):

@echo off 
setlocal 

set base=compute directory 
set pkg=compute sub-directory 
set scripts=%base%\%pkg%\Scripts 

pushd %scripts%

endlocal 

call .\activate.bat 
popd

Since the above doesn't work (see Marcelo's comment), I would probably do this as follows:

set uniquePrefix_base=compute directory 
set uniquePrefix_pkg=compute sub-directory 
set uniquePrefix_scripts=%uniquePrefix_base%\%uniquePrefix_pkg%\Scripts 
set uniquePrefix_base=
set uniquePrefix_pkg=

call %uniquePrefix_scripts%\activate.bat
set uniquePrefix_scripts=

where uniquePrefix_ is chosen to be "almost certainly" unique in your environment.

You could also test on entry to the bat file that the "uniquePrefix_..." environment variables are undefined on entry as expected - if not you can exit with an error.

I don't like copying the BAT to the TEMP directory as a general solution because of (a) the potential for a race condition with >1 caller, and (b) in the general case a BAT file might be accessing other files using a path relative to its location (e.g. %~dp0..\somedir\somefile.dat).

The following ugly solution will solve (b):

setlocal

set scripts=...whatever...
echo %scripts%>"%TEMP%\%~n0.dat"

endlocal

for /f "tokens=*" %%i in ('type "%TEMP%\%~n0.dat"') do call %%i\activate.bat
del "%TEMP%\%~n0.dat"
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    An inspired idea! I love it. Unfortunately, it doesn't work. I tried it, and found that endlocal also reverts to the working directory before setlocal was local. – Marcelo Cantos Jul 16 '10 at 6:26
  • See Anonymous' answer for a nice way of doing it. It gets messy with more variables but works fine without needing to create any files. – Joey Jul 16 '10 at 8:24
1

For surviving multiple variables: If you choose to go with the "classic"
ENDLOCAL & SET VAR=%TEMPVAR% mentioned sometimes in other responses here (and are satisfied that the drawbacks shown in some of the responses are addressed or are not an issue), note that you can do multiple variables, a la ENDLOCAL & SET var1=%local1% & SET var2=%local2%.

I share this because other than the linked site below, I have only seen the "trick" illustrated with a single variable, and like myself some may have incorrectly assumed that it only "works" for a single variable.

Docs: https://ss64.com/nt/endlocal.html

| improve this answer | |
0

To answer my own question (in case no other answer comes to light, and to avoid repeats of the one I already know about)...

Create a temporary batch file before calling endlocal that contains the command to call the target batch file, then call and delete it after endlocal:

echo %scripts%\activate.bat > %TEMP%\activate.bat

endlocal

call %TEMP%\activate.bat
del %TEMP%\activate.bat

This is so ugly, I want to hang my head in shame. Better answers are most welcome.

| improve this answer | |
-2

How about this.

@echo off
setlocal
set base=compute directory
set pkg=compute sub-directory
set scripts=%base%\%pkg%\Scripts
(
  endlocal
  "%scripts%\activate.bat"
)
| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    Why you didn't test it before posting? It doesn't work at all – jeb Oct 1 '16 at 14:06

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.