17

I would like to make this process in batches, because of the volume.

Here's my code:

 getconn = conexiones()
 con = getconn.mysqlDWconnect()
 with con:
     cur = con.cursor(mdb.cursors.DictCursor)
     cur.execute("SELECT id, date, product_id, sales FROM sales")
     rows = cur.fetchall()

How can I implement an index to fetch the data in batches?

35

First point: a python db-api.cursor is an iterator, so unless you really need to load a whole batch in memory at once, you can just start with using this feature, ie instead of:

cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM mytable")
rows = cursor.fetchall()
for row in rows:
   do_something_with(row)

you could just:

cursor.execute("SELECT * FROM mytable")
for row in cursor:
   do_something_with(row)

Then if your db connector's implementation still doesn't make proper use of this feature, it will be time to add LIMIT and OFFSET to the mix:

# py2 / py3 compat
try:
    # xrange is defined in py2 only
    xrange
except NameError:
    # py3 range is actually p2 xrange
    xrange = range

cursor.execute("SELECT count(*) FROM mytable")
count = cursor.fetchone()[0]
batch_size = 42 # whatever

for offset in xrange(0, count, batch_size):
    cursor.execute(
        "SELECT * FROM mytable LIMIT %s OFFSET %s", 
        (batch_size, offset))
   for row in cursor:
       do_something_with(row)
3
  • Your solution is so much cleaner than mine! – Claudia Guirao Sep 17 '15 at 10:12
  • Just to make a note for everyone reviewing this "xrange" has been depreciated in Python 3. – Yags Oct 29 '19 at 15:58
  • How to expand this solution to write batch_size number of rows from each iteration to csv file? For example in each iteration to write 1000 rows till the end of the count? – user2171512 Feb 9 at 20:25
6

You can use

SELECT id, date, product_id, sales FROM sales LIMIT X OFFSET Y;

where X is the size of the batch you need and Y is current offset (X times number of current iterations for example)

0

To expand on akalikin's answer, you can use a stepped iteration to split the query into chunks, and then use LIMIT and OFFSET to execute the query.

cur = con.cursor(mdb.cursors.DictCursor)
cur.execute("SELECT COUNT(*) FROM sales")

for i in range(0,cur.fetchall(),5):
    cur2 = con.cursor(mdb.cursors.DictCursor)
    cur2.execute("SELECT id, date, product_id, sales FROM sales LIMIT %s OFFSET %s" %(5,i))
    rows = cur2.fetchall()
    print rows
0

Thank you, here's how I implement it with your suggestions:

control = True
index = 0
while control==True:
   getconn = conexiones()
   con = getconn.mysqlDWconnect()
   with con:
        cur = con.cursor(mdb.cursors.DictCursor)
        query = "SELECT id, date, product_id, sales FROM sales  limit 10 OFFSET " + str(10 * (index))
        cur.execute(query)
        rows = cur.fetchall()
        index = index+1        
        if len(rows)== 0:
            control=False
   for row in rows:
        dataset.append(row)
6
  • 1
    I see you're collecting rows in what seems to be a list or list-like dataset object, which kind of defeat the whole point of batching and direct cursor iteration, ie avoiding to load the whole shebang in memory... May I ask how you're using this dataset object ? There might be a much better solution here, Python has a strong support for lazy evaluation. – bruno desthuilliers Sep 17 '15 at 10:20
  • I need to retrieve 18M rows dataset, after it I have to clean some references that I'm not interested (subset) and merge it with other one. – Claudia Guirao Sep 17 '15 at 10:22
  • And do you really need to get the whole dataset in memory to do so ??? When working on "huge" datasets, the canonical pattern is to use a "stream/process/write" solution. – bruno desthuilliers Sep 17 '15 at 10:33
  • I have been thinking on it... I would try to implement a loop trying to lighten the process. Thank you so much for your advice. :) – Claudia Guirao Sep 17 '15 at 10:39
  • 1
    You may want to have a look at generator functions - they are a great way to provide lazy evaluation at very little cost. – bruno desthuilliers Sep 17 '15 at 11:13

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