95

ES6 is fully available in Node 4. I was wondering whether it includes a concept of interface to define method contracts as in MyClass implements MyInterface.

I can't find much with my Googling, but maybe there is a nice trick or workaround available.

  • 2
    Fully? By far not. – Bergi Sep 17 '15 at 13:42
  • 1
    JS still uses duck typing. There are no statically enforced "method contracts". If you want to test them dynamically, you easily can write your own interface checker. – Bergi Sep 17 '15 at 13:44
  • 22
    Late to the party, but disagree the question is off-topic. OP wants confirmation if an expected feature exists. The new, simplified, syntax for classes is long overdue and will likely be widely used. But interfaces are common in other languages for very good reason. I too was surprised, and disappointed, to learn interfaces are not part of ES2015. Given that this is likely a common discovery, IMHO it is not unreasonable to ask if there is a suggested workaround. – Berniev Mar 18 '17 at 20:57
  • 8
    How on earth is this off topic? Interfaces are programming technique not a product. The question is valid and is a good one with the release of ECMA Script 6 bringing in Java like class definitions. I think the closing of this topic demonstrates the lack of understanding and how on Stack overflow the points system does not correlate with ability. – Andrew S Jan 8 '18 at 6:11
  • 4
    At literally no point does the OP (ask) us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource in any of this question. – Liam Feb 9 '18 at 16:11
77

Interfaces are not part of the ES6 but classes are.

If you really need them, you should look at TypeScript which support them.

  • 1
    "them" being interfaces. FWIW You may need to consider carefully the link for the transpiler provided above. Not exactly as I expected, but close. – Berniev Mar 18 '17 at 22:14
9

In comments debiasej wrote the mentioned below article explains more about design patterns (based on interfaces, classes):

http://loredanacirstea.github.io/es6-design-patterns/

Design patterns book in javascript may also be useful for you:

http://addyosmani.com/resources/essentialjsdesignpatterns/book/

Design pattern = classes + interface or multiple inheritance

An example of the factory pattern in ES6 JS (to run: node example.js):

"use strict";

// Types.js - Constructors used behind the scenes

// A constructor for defining new cars
class Car {
  constructor(options){
    console.log("Creating Car...\n");
    // some defaults
    this.doors = options.doors || 4;
    this.state = options.state || "brand new";
    this.color = options.color || "silver";
  }
}

// A constructor for defining new trucks
class Truck {
  constructor(options){
    console.log("Creating Truck...\n");
    this.state = options.state || "used";
    this.wheelSize = options.wheelSize || "large";
    this.color = options.color || "blue";
  }
}


// FactoryExample.js

// Define a skeleton vehicle factory
class VehicleFactory {}

// Define the prototypes and utilities for this factory

// Our default vehicleClass is Car
VehicleFactory.prototype.vehicleClass = Car;

// Our Factory method for creating new Vehicle instances
VehicleFactory.prototype.createVehicle = function ( options ) {

  switch(options.vehicleType){
    case "car":
      this.vehicleClass = Car;
      break;
    case "truck":
      this.vehicleClass = Truck;
      break;
    //defaults to VehicleFactory.prototype.vehicleClass (Car)
  }

  return new this.vehicleClass( options );

};

// Create an instance of our factory that makes cars
var carFactory = new VehicleFactory();
var car = carFactory.createVehicle( {
            vehicleType: "car",
            color: "yellow",
            doors: 6 } );

// Test to confirm our car was created using the vehicleClass/prototype Car

// Outputs: true
console.log( car instanceof Car );

// Outputs: Car object of color "yellow", doors: 6 in a "brand new" state
console.log( car );

var movingTruck = carFactory.createVehicle( {
                      vehicleType: "truck",
                      state: "like new",
                      color: "red",
                      wheelSize: "small" } );

// Test to confirm our truck was created with the vehicleClass/prototype Truck

// Outputs: true
console.log( movingTruck instanceof Truck );

// Outputs: Truck object of color "red", a "like new" state
// and a "small" wheelSize
console.log( movingTruck );
3

This is my solution for the problem. You can 'implement' multiple interfaces by overriding one Interface with another.

class MyInterface {

    // Declare your JS doc in the Interface to make it acceable while writing the Class and for later inheritance

    /**
     * Gives the sum of the given Numbers
     * @param {Number} a The first Number
     * @param {Number} b The second Number
     * @return {Number} The sum of the Numbers
     */
    sum(a, b) { this._WARNING('sum(a, b)'); }


    // delcare a warning generator to notice if a method of the interface is not overridden
    // Needs the function name of the Interface method or any String that gives you a hint ;)
    _WARNING(fName='unknown method') {
        console.warn('WARNING! Function "'+fName+'" is not overridden in '+this.constructor.name);
    }
}

class MultipleInterfaces extends MyInterface {
    // this is used for "implement" multiple Interfaces at once
    /**
     * Gives the square of the given Number
     * @param {Number} a The Number
     * @return {Number} The square of the Numbers
     */
    square(a) { this._WARNING('square(a)'); }
}

class MyCorrectUsedClass extends MyInterface {
    // You can easy use the JS doc declared in the interface
    /** @inheritdoc */
    sum(a, b) {
        return a+b;
    }
}
class MyIncorrectUsedClass extends MyInterface {
    // not overriding the method sum(a, b)
}

class MyMultipleInterfacesClass extends MultipleInterfaces {
    // nothing overriden to show, that it still works
}


let working = new MyCorrectUsedClass();

let notWorking = new MyIncorrectUsedClass();

let multipleInterfacesInstance = new MyMultipleInterfacesClass();

// TEST IT

console.log('working.sum(1, 2) =', working.sum(1, 2));
// output: 'working.sum(1, 2) = 3'

console.log('notWorking.sum(1, 2) =', notWorking.sum(1, 2));
// output: 'notWorking.sum(1, 2) = undefined'
// but also sends a warn to the console with 'WARNING! Function "sum(a, b)" is not overridden in MyIncorrectUsedClass'

console.log('multipleInterfacesInstance.sum(1, 2) =', multipleInterfacesInstance.sum(1, 2));
// output: 'multipleInterfacesInstance.sum(1, 2) = undefined'
// console warn: 'WARNING! Function "sum(a, b)" is not overridden in MyMultipleInterfacesClass'

console.log('multipleInterfacesInstance.square(2) =', multipleInterfacesInstance.square(2));
// output: 'multipleInterfacesInstance.square(2) = undefined'
// console warn: 'WARNING! Function "square(a)" is not overridden in MyMultipleInterfacesClass'</code>

EDIT:

I improved the code so you now can simply use implement(baseClass, interface1, interface2, ...) in the extend.

/**
* Implements any number of interfaces to a given class.
* @param cls The class you want to use
* @param interfaces Any amount of interfaces separated by comma
* @return The class cls exteded with all methods of all implemented interfaces
*/
function implement(cls, ...interfaces) {
    let clsPrototype = Object.getPrototypeOf(cls).prototype;
    for (let i = 0; i < interfaces.length; i++) {
        let proto = interfaces[i].prototype;
        for (let methodName of Object.getOwnPropertyNames(proto)) {
            if (methodName!== 'constructor')
                if (typeof proto[methodName] === 'function')
                    if (!clsPrototype[methodName]) {
                        console.warn('WARNING! "'+methodName+'" of Interface "'+interfaces[i].name+'" is not declared in class "'+cls.name+'"');
                        clsPrototype[methodName] = proto[methodName];
                    }
        }
    }
    return cls;
}

// Basic Interface to warn, whenever an not overridden method is used
class MyBaseInterface {
    // declare a warning generator to notice if a method of the interface is not overridden
    // Needs the function name of the Interface method or any String that gives you a hint ;)
    _WARNING(fName='unknown method') {
        console.warn('WARNING! Function "'+fName+'" is not overridden in '+this.constructor.name);
    }
}


// create a custom class
/* This is the simplest example but you could also use
*
*   class MyCustomClass1 extends implement(MyBaseInterface) {
*       foo() {return 66;}
*   }
*
*/
class MyCustomClass1 extends MyBaseInterface {
    foo() {return 66;}
}

// create a custom interface
class MyCustomInterface1 {
     // Declare your JS doc in the Interface to make it acceable while writing the Class and for later inheritance

    /**
     * Gives the sum of the given Numbers
     * @param {Number} a The first Number
     * @param {Number} b The second Number
     * @return {Number} The sum of the Numbers
     */
    sum(a, b) { this._WARNING('sum(a, b)'); }
}

// and another custom interface
class MyCustomInterface2 {
    /**
     * Gives the square of the given Number
     * @param {Number} a The Number
     * @return {Number} The square of the Numbers
     */
    square(a) { this._WARNING('square(a)'); }
}

// Extend your custom class even more and implement the custom interfaces
class AllInterfacesImplemented extends implement(MyCustomClass1, MyCustomInterface1, MyCustomInterface2) {
    /**
    * @inheritdoc
    */
    sum(a, b) { return a+b; }

    /**
    * Multiplies two Numbers
    * @param {Number} a The first Number
    * @param {Number} b The second Number
    * @return {Number}
    */
    multiply(a, b) {return a*b;}
}


// TEST IT

let x = new AllInterfacesImplemented();

console.log("x.foo() =", x.foo());
//output: 'x.foo() = 66'

console.log("x.square(2) =", x.square(2));
// output: 'x.square(2) = undefined
// console warn: 'WARNING! Function "square(a)" is not overridden in AllInterfacesImplemented'

console.log("x.sum(1, 2) =", x.sum(1, 2));
// output: 'x.sum(1, 2) = 3'

console.log("x.multiply(4, 5) =", x.multiply(4, 5));
// output: 'x.multiply(4, 5) = 20'

1

Given that ECMA is a 'class-free' language, implementing classical composition doesn't - in my eyes - make a lot of sense. The danger is that, in so doing, you are effectively attempting to re-engineer the language (and, if one feels strongly about that, there are excellent holistic solutions such as the aforementioned TypeScript that mitigate reinventing the wheel)

Now that isn't to say that composition is out of the question however in Plain Old JS. I researched this at length some time ago. The strongest candidate I have seen for handling composition within the object prototypal paradigm is stampit, which I now use across a wide range of projects. And, importantly, it adheres to a well articulated specification.

more information on stamps here

  • I stand by my post even with a -1. Sadly, that is the democracy of SO sometimes. I hope someone finds the links useful. Stampit is worth your time. – Jay Edwards May 1 at 4:10
  • -1 is not a final verdict. Your post might end up +100/-1. However I still think it's vague. JS is not "class-free" anymore. I suspect "Classical composition" will also not be understood by most to mean what you meant: inheritance. (Consider the whole inheritance vs. composition holy war.) It is also not clear what "Plain Old JS" is. ES5? Albeit with a more verbose syntax, it supported techniques that are more widespread now, such as "true" mix-ins. Stamps look interesting, what are their advantages over mix-ins? – ᆼᆺᆼ May 1 at 4:44
  • the class keyword is syntactic sugar. JS - ES^6 or otherwise - is not a class language. it merely decorates the traditional function constructor approach in ES5. "plain old JS" happily defines any of the JS implementations of ES, therefore. Frankly, I wish the decision hadn't been made to further entrench the idea of class in the language quora.com/Are-ES6-classes-bad-for-JavaScript. Stamps better reflect JS' strengths IMHO. stampit.js.org gives a good rundown of the differences from classes. Ultimately, it's a more pragmatic methodology. – Jay Edwards May 1 at 5:53
  • But then, what is a "class language"? C++? class is just a synonym for struct. A truly classic language like Smalltalk? It allows dynamic extension of prototypes and even instances – ᆼᆺᆼ May 1 at 6:18
  • That's a reasonable point. I would define a class language as a language that is intrinsically OOP. From MDN: "JavaScript is a prototype-based, multi-paradigm, dynamic language, supporting object-oriented, imperative, and declarative (e.g. functional programming) styles." google.com/url?sa=t&source=web&rct=j&url=https://… – Jay Edwards May 1 at 14:44
0

there are packages that can simulate interfaces .

you can use es6-interface

  • 2
    the problem with your answer is that he did not ask for a "tool" to do it. but how it was done queni would have been more correct an answer that would spell out how that form did it. – Gianfrancesco Aurecchia Feb 12 at 8:08

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