1

I am trying to understand how password_hash() function works.

I have got this ultra-simplified php login (completely unsafe, just designed to learn) with four passwords chosen by me.

<?php

$data = file_get_contents('pass.txt');

if($_POST['pass']) {
    $line = explode("\n", $data);
    for($i = 0; $i<count($line); $i++) {
        $item = explode("#", $line[$i]);
        if($_POST['pass'] == $item[0]) {
            echo "Welcome! You're logged in!";
        }
    }
}

else { echo '<form method="POST" action="">
            <input type="password" name="pass">
            <input type="submit">
            <form>';
}

?>

and this pass.txt, where the passwords are kept (.txt flatfile database):

passone
passtwo
passthree
passfour

Is it possible to add password_hash() function to my code?

I guess the php should be able to rewrite the database for this purpose, as this functions rewrites the passwords every time you login.

Thanks guys XXX

5
  • 2
    What's your exact doubt? If you hash passwords you'll store stuff like "$2y$10$.vGA1O9wmRjrwAVXD98HNOgsNpDczlqm3Jq7KnEd1rVAGv3Fykk1a" instead of "passone". That's all, roughly. Sep 17, 2015 at 9:45
  • Yes, but isn't it suposed to change every login? Should the php rewrite the txt file? I don't know how to write that :'(
    – Kathlyn
    Sep 17, 2015 at 9:47
  • use a predictable salt, like the username or something. The hash will then be consistent which will allow you to compare.
    – DevDonkey
    Sep 17, 2015 at 9:48
  • 1
    @DevDonkey NO! No no no. Salts must be random. password_hash creates a random salt. Don't subvert that, it's missing the point of salts. You just need to use password_verify instead of ==.
    – deceze
    Sep 17, 2015 at 9:52
  • @deceze ahh, I didnt know such magic existed! cool :)
    – DevDonkey
    Sep 17, 2015 at 9:54

2 Answers 2

1

yes.

oh, and you should use isset, else you might get PHP errors. and you should break; after finding a correct password, the rest is just a waste of cpu.

first for creating your pass.txt:

<?php
$passes=array(
'passone','passtwo','passthree'
);
foreach($passes as &$pass){
$pass=password_hash($pass,PASSWORD_DEFAULT);
}
file_put_contents("pass.txt",implode("\n",$passes));

then do like

<?php

$data = file_get_contents('pass.txt');

if(array_key_exists('pass',$_POST)){
    $lines = explode("\n", $data);
    for($i = 0; $i<count($lines); $i++) {
        if(password_verify($_POST['pass'],$lines[$i])) {
            echo "Welcome! You're logged in!";
            break;
        }
    }
}

else { echo '<form method="POST" action="">
            <input type="password" name="pass">
            <input type="submit">
            <form>';
}
  • word of warning though. personally, i do not like password_hash, because its not easy to integrate with applications written in other languages (to c++ in my scenario), the hash structure is not clearly defined (as far as i know), short of reading the php interpreter's source code..
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  • Looks really good but, should the passwords be written in the php file then? (line3 of your upper code)
    – Kathlyn
    Sep 17, 2015 at 9:58
  • where you get the passwords from is up to you.. grab it from a text file, a database, whatever. here, i just hardcode them in a php file, yes. go ahead, use $passes=file("unencrypted_passwords.txt",FILE_IGNORE_NEW_LINES); ^^
    – hanshenrik
    Sep 17, 2015 at 10:00
  • I'm trying your code. It's great. Is everything correct in the code which creates the passwords? It writes UNENCRYPTED passwords in the database. Shouldn't it write hashed codes and rewrite them on and on?
    – Kathlyn
    Sep 17, 2015 at 10:18
  • wups, i found a typo in the code, "foreach($passess as &$pass)" should'ev been "foreach($passes as &$pass)".. but the passwords should be encrypted/hashed in the database, yes.. and i tried the code myself, everything is hashed in the pass.txt, no plaintext passwords..
    – hanshenrik
    Sep 17, 2015 at 10:30
  • I'll give you the tick, it's a really great solution. Anyway, there should be a way to get rid of the plain passwords in the php, once they are witten in the database. shouldn't it?
    – Kathlyn
    Sep 17, 2015 at 10:52
1
  1. Do echo password_hash('passone') for each of your passwords, store the resulting long gobbledygook string in your text file.
  2. Instead of if ($_POST['pass'] == $item[0]),
    you do if (password_verify($_POST['pass'], $item[0])).

That is, you use password_verify on the plaintext password and a hashed password from your text file. password_hash creates a random salt during the hash process. This random salt is part of the gobbledygook string it returns! You need to reuse that random salt during the comparison. password_verify takes care of that for you.

That's all that's needed.

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  • Thanks, it seems you understand me, but the password stored changes everytime you login and, under your approach, it wouldn't do it as it doesn't modify the flatfile database. (I don't know if I explained it clearly) XXX
    – Kathlyn
    Sep 17, 2015 at 9:53
  • 1
    See my update. You only hash the initial password once, from then on you use password_verify. You don't need to keep changing anything.
    – deceze
    Sep 17, 2015 at 9:54
  • See stackoverflow.com/a/16736254/476 for an explanation of the underlying mechanism.
    – deceze
    Sep 17, 2015 at 9:57
  • Thanks four your interest! Your answer was absolutely great but the other suited best my intentions. Maybe i didnt express correctly the question. I upvoted your answer too as I think it could be useful too. Thanks again xxx
    – Kathlyn
    Sep 17, 2015 at 11:19

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