42

I want to execute a code block only on devices running with an OS older than iOS8. I can't do:

if #available(iOS 8.0, *) == false {
    doFoo() 
}

The solution I'm using for now is:

if #available(iOS 8.0, *) { } else { 
    doFoo() 
}

, but it feels clunky. Is there another way to negate the #available statement elegantly with Swift ?

7
  • 1
    It's rarely a good idea to check the OS version. The proper thing is to see if a class or method exists.
    – rmaddy
    Sep 17, 2015 at 15:16
  • 11
    @rmaddy what you're saying isn't true at all. There's a portion in the WWDC videos in which references to do exactly this. Jul 14, 2016 at 14:17
  • @rmaddy read such bignerdranch.com/blog/hi-im-available. Jul 14, 2016 at 14:17
  • 1
    @TheCodingArt What I said was true. However, based on the "But You Told Me Earlier…" section of the article you linked, it's no longer true in Swift, as of Swift 2 (but still true for Objective-C). Good to know.
    – rmaddy
    Jul 14, 2016 at 15:21
  • 1
    @rmaddy Read my response here: stackoverflow.com/questions/24166919/…. There are defined constants in iOS Apple provided specifically for checking the version number via NSFoundationNumber. There's also NSProcessInfo().isOperatingSystemAtLeastVersion for further specifics. Both of which are available in Objc. NSFoundationNumber has been around for quite some time. Jul 14, 2016 at 16:34

5 Answers 5

33

I use a guard for this:

guard #available(iOS 8.0, *) else {
    // Code for earlier OS
}

There's slight potential for awkwardness since guard is required to exit the scope, of course. But that's easy to sidestep by putting the whole thing into its own function or method:

func makeABox()
{
    let boxSize = .large

    self.fixupOnPreOS8()

    self.drawBox(sized: boxSize)
}

func fixupOnPreOS8()
{
    guard #available(iOS 8, *) else {
        // Fix up
        return
    }
}

which is really easy to remove when you drop support for the earlier system.

2
  • 1
    Using guard for this feels pretty Swifty if you ask me — nice hack! :-) Apr 22, 2017 at 20:40
  • 6
    Not sure I agree.. Guard forces a return which doesn't work everywhere Oct 11, 2019 at 8:54
15

In Swift 5.6, you can now do the following:

if #unavailable(iOS 15) {
    // Under iOS 15
} else {
    // iOS 15+
}

Or just the following depending on your case:

if #unavailable(iOS 15) {
    // Under iOS 15
}

This is part of SE-0290: Negative availability.

9

It is not possible to have logic around the #available statement.

Indeed, the statement is used by the compiler to infer what methods can be called within the scope it embraces, hence nothing can be done at runtime that would conditionally execute the block.

It is possible though to combine conditions, using a comma, as follows

if #available(iOS 8.0, *), myNumber == 2 {
  // some code
}
3

Seems it's the best solution, before Swift2 you had to use other methods such as using ready-to-use classes wrote by individuals. But that's fine, you can set a variable in viewDidLoad() and use it to detect the older devices:

var isNewerThan8: Bool = false

func viewDidLoad(){
   if #available(iOS 8.0, *) { 
      isNewerThan8 = true
   } else { 
      isNewerThan8 = false
   }
}

func myFunction(){
   if isNewerThan8 {
     //foo
   }else{
    //boo
   }
}
3

Swift 5.6, Xcode 13.3 Beta

if #unavailable(iOS 13, *) {
   // below iOS 13
} else {
  // iOS 13 and above
}

Swift 5.5 and earlier

a simple way to check is by using #available with a guard statement

guard #available(iOS 13, *) else {
   // code for earlier versions than iOS 13
   return
} 

another way is to use if/else

if #available(iOS 13, *) {} else {
    // code for earlier versions than iOS 13
}

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