4

I have a C++ class with a member function that takes an unsigned char* buffer and an unsigned int length as arguments and operates on them. I've wrapped this class with Boost::Python and would like to pass a pre-populated buffer to the class from a Python script. The Python-side buffer is created with struct.pack. I can't figure out how to make the argument type match and keep getting Boost.Python.ArgumentError.

include/Example.h

#ifndef EXAMPLECLASS_H_
#define EXAMPLECLASS_H_

#include <cstdio>

class ExampleClass
{
public:
    ExampleClass() {}
    virtual ~ExampleClass() {}

    void printBuffer(unsigned char* buffer, unsigned int length)
    {
        for (unsigned int i = 0; i < length; ++i)
        {
            printf("%c", buffer[i]);
        }

        printf("\n");
    }
};

#endif

src/example.cpp

#include "Example.h"

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    unsigned char buf[4];
    buf[0] = 0x41;
    buf[1] = 0x42;
    buf[2] = 0x43;
    buf[3] = 0x44;

    ExampleClass e;
    e.printBuffer(buf, 4);

    return 0;
}

src/Example_py.cpp

#include <boost/python.hpp>
#include "Example.h"

using namespace boost::python;

BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(example_py)
{
    class_<ExampleClass>("ExampleClass")
    .def("printBuffer", &ExampleClass::printBuffer)
    ;
}

scripts/example.py

#!/usr/bin/env python

import example_py
import struct
import ctypes

buf = struct.pack('BBBB', 0x41, 0x42, 0x43, 0x44)

print 'python:'
print buf

e = example_py.ExampleClass()

print 'c++:'
print e.printBuffer(ctypes.cast(ctypes.c_char_p(buf), ctypes.POINTER(ctypes.c_ubyte)), len(buf))

CMakeLists.txt (incomplete)

include_directories(
    include
    ${Boost_INCLUDE_DIRS}
    ${PYTHON_INCLUDE_DIRS}
)

add_library(example_py
    src/Example_py.cpp
)
target_link_libraries(example_py ${Boost_LIBRARIES} ${PYTHON_LIBRARIES})
set_target_properties(example_py PROPERTIES PREFIX "")

add_executable(example src/example.cpp)
target_link_libraries(example example_py)

Output

$ ./example
ABCD

$ ./scripts/example.py
python: ABCD
c++:
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "/home/dustingooding/example/scripts/example.py", line 13, in <module>
    print 'c++:', e.printBuffer(ctypes.cast(ctypes.c_char_p(buf), ctypes.POINTER(ctypes.c_ubyte)), len(buf))
Boost.Python.ArgumentError: Python argument types in
    ExampleClass.printBuffer(ExampleClass, LP_c_ubyte, int)
did not match C++ signature:
    printBuffer(ExampleClass {lvalue}, unsigned char*, unsigned int)

I've tried a number of different approaches (passing 'buf' directly, passing 'buf' as a ctypes.c_char_p, creating a ctypes.ubyte array and populating it with the contents of 'buf' and passing it), but none seem to work.

I don't understand why 'LP_c_ubyte' and 'unsigned char*' don't match.

EDIT

Here's a Github project with a ready-to-go codebase. Feel free to use this. I've added @Tanner's fix. https://github.com/dustingooding/boost_python_ucharp_example

6
0

It may be worth considering exposing a Pythonic auxiliary function as the ExampleClass.printBuffer method to Python, that delegates to the c-ish ExampleClass::printBuffer member function. For instance, this would allow the Python users to invoke:

import example
import struct

buf = struct.pack('BBBB', 0x41, 0x42, 0x43, 0x44)
e.printBuffer(buf)

Rather than requiring the user to perform the correct ctypes cast and sizing.


The struct.pack() method returns a str object in Python2 and a bytes object in Python3, so the auxiliary C++ function would need to populate a continuous block of memory with the elements of from either str or bytes. The boost::python::stl_input_iterator can provide a convenient way to construct C++ containers, such as std::vector<char>, from a Python object, such as str or bytes. The only oddity is that stl_input_iterator expects the Python type to support the iterable protocol, which str does not do. However, the builtin iter() Python method can be used to create an iterable object.

/// @brief Auxiliary function used to allow a Python iterable object with char
///        elements to be passed to ExampleClass.printBuffer().
void example_class_print_buffer_wrap(
  ExampleClass& self,
  boost::python::object py_buffer)
{
  namespace python = boost::python;
  // `str` objects do not implement the iterator protcol (__iter__),
  // but do implement the sequence protocol (__getitem__).  Use the
  // `iter()` builtin to create an iterator for the buffer.
  // >>> __builtins__.iter(py_buffer)
  python::object locals(python::borrowed(PyEval_GetLocals()));
  python::object py_iter = locals["__builtins__"].attr("iter");
  python::stl_input_iterator<char> begin(
     py_iter(py_buffer)), end;

  // Copy the py_buffer into a local buffer with known continguous memory.
  std::vector<char> buffer(begin, end);

  // Cast and delegate to the printBuffer member function.
  self.printBuffer(
    reinterpret_cast<unsigned char*>(&buffer[0]),
    buffer.size());
}

With the auxiliary function created, one just needs to expose it as the ExampleClass.printBuffer method:

BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(example)
{
  namespace python = boost::python;
  python::class_<ExampleClass>("ExampleClass")
    .def("printBuffer", &example_class_print_buffer_wrap)
    ;
}

Here is a complete example demonstrating this approach:

#include <cstdio>
#include <vector>
#include <boost/python.hpp>
#include <boost/python/stl_iterator.hpp>

// Mocks...
/// @brief Legacy class that cannot be changed.
class ExampleClass
{
public:
  void printBuffer(unsigned char* buffer, unsigned int length)
  {
    for (unsigned int i = 0; i < length; ++i)
    {
      printf("%c", buffer[i]);
    }

    printf("\n");
  }
};

/// @brief Auxiliary function used to allow a Python iterable object with char
///        elements to be passed to ExampleClass.printBuffer().
void example_class_print_buffer_wrap(
  ExampleClass& self,
  boost::python::object py_buffer)
{
  namespace python = boost::python;
  // `str` objects do not implement the iterator protcol (__iter__),
  // but do implement the sequence protocol (__getitem__).  Use the
  // `iter()` builtin to create an iterator for the buffer.
  // >>> __builtins__.iter(py_buffer)
  python::object locals(python::borrowed(PyEval_GetLocals()));
  python::object py_iter = locals["__builtins__"].attr("iter");
  python::stl_input_iterator<char> begin(
     py_iter(py_buffer)), end;

  // Copy the py_buffer into a local buffer with known continguous memory.
  std::vector<char> buffer(begin, end);

  // Cast and delegate to the printBuffer member function.
  self.printBuffer(
    reinterpret_cast<unsigned char*>(&buffer[0]),
    buffer.size());
}

BOOST_PYTHON_MODULE(example)
{
  namespace python = boost::python;
  python::class_<ExampleClass>("ExampleClass")
    .def("printBuffer", &example_class_print_buffer_wrap)
    ;
}

Interactive usage:

>>> import example
>>> import struct
>>> buf = struct.pack('BBBB', 0x41, 0x42, 0x43, 0x44)
>>> print 'python:', buf
python: ABCD
>>> e = example.ExampleClass()
>>> e.printBuffer(buf)
ABCD
| improve this answer | |
  • The ctypes approach looks to me as though it is an XY problem, so I opted to not go into detail for it within this answer. – Tanner Sansbury Sep 17 '15 at 19:47
  • That's an excellent example. Thanks for your suggestion. I was hoping not to need an auxiliary function, but clearly it works. Let's give this question a little while to bake and see if anyone can provide a direct call fix. If not, I'll give your answer the green check. – Dustin Sep 17 '15 at 19:50
  • @Dustin As far as I know, there is no way to do this directly. With ctypes and Boost.Python, the exposed C++ functions are not directly exposed to Python, but rather a callable Python object is exposed that delegates to the respective library's function dispatch at the language boundary. Boost.Python and ctypes each have their own dispatch mechanics and registered type conversions which are not interoperable. Hence, if attempting to provide ctype types to an exposed Boost.Python function, one would need to register custom converters for those types within Boost.Python. – Tanner Sansbury Sep 18 '15 at 4:11
  • 1
    Fpr example, LP_c_ubyte is not an unsigned char*, but rather a type that ctypes knows how to convert to unsigned char* when it is dispatching a function obtained through ctypes. Boost.Python does not know how to convert the LP_c_ubyte type to an unsigned char*. – Tanner Sansbury Sep 18 '15 at 4:31
  • 1
    @Dustin Use stl_input_iterator when you favor generic over speed; use PyX_AsString() functions when you favor speed over generic. This question asked about an unsigned char buffer, and mentions struct.pack() which changes return types between Python2 and Python3, so I opted for a generic solution (it also works with the array module). If you are always using Python2 struct.pack() and never modifying the buffer, then you could also reinterpret the string directly: demo. – Tanner Sansbury Sep 18 '15 at 15:46
1
0

The python documentation lists the following in the chapter Fundamental Data Types:

class ctypes.c_char_p

Represents the C char * datatype when it points to a zero-terminated string. For a general character pointer that may also point to binary data, POINTER(c_char) must be used. The constructor accepts an integer address, or a string.

shows that you should probably use a c_char_p type. If you use the POINTER() functions this will be a LP_c_char_p.

The type

LP_c_ubyte   /* corresponds to */  unsigned char;

you should probably use

LP_c_char_p    /* which corresponds to */    char *;

Update: I've corrected the types above. Also: I'm not a python expert, so I might have it wrong. There is also this answer.

| improve this answer | |
  • If ctypes.POINTER(ctypes.c_ubyte) gives LP_c_ubyte, what gives an LP_c_ubyte_p? There's no such thing as ctypes.c_ubyte_p to feed to ctypes.POINTER. – Dustin Sep 17 '15 at 18:40
  • you are correct, but ctypes.c_char_p is. hold on, I'm updating my answer. – user23573 Sep 17 '15 at 18:56
  • changing the first argument to simply ctypes.c_char_p(buf) gives the same-ish error: ExampleClass.printBuffer(ExampleClass, c_char_p, c_uint). This is failing (I assume) because of the inability to convert a char* to unsigned char*. – Dustin Sep 17 '15 at 19:07
  • c_char_p is a fundamental data type, but it doesn't match with unsigned char*, only char*. If I wanted to use c_char_p, I'd need to change the function declaration to use a char*, and I'm not convinced that's a good idea (in my case or the general case). – Dustin Sep 17 '15 at 19:36

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