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I need to display a file size as String using sensible units.

e.g.

1L ==> "1 B";
1024L ==> "1 KB";
2537253L ==> "2.3 MB"

etc.

I found this previous answer, which I didn't find satisfactory

I have come up with my own solution which has similar shortcomings:

private static final long K = 1024;
private static final long M = K * K;
private static final long G = M * K;
private static final long T = G * K;

public static String convertToStringRepresentation(final long value){
    final long[] dividers = new long[] { T, G, M, K, 1 };
    final String[] units = new String[] { "TB", "GB", "MB", "KB", "B" };
    if(value < 1)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid file size: " + value);
    String result = null;
    for(int i = 0; i < dividers.length; i++){
        final long divider = dividers[i];
        if(value >= divider){
            result = format(value, divider, units[i]);
            break;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

private static String format(final long value,
    final long divider,
    final String unit){
    final double result =
        divider > 1 ? (double) value / (double) divider : (double) value;
    return String.format("%.1f %s", Double.valueOf(result), unit);
}

The main problem is my limited knowledge of Decimalformat and / or String.format. I would like 1024L, 1025L etc to map to 1 KB rather than 1.0 KB.

So, two possibilities:

  1. I would prefer a good out-of-the-box solution in a public library like apache commons or google guava.
  2. If there isn't, can someone show me how to get rid of the '.0' part (without resorting to string replacement and regex, I can do that myself)
379
public static String readableFileSize(long size) {
    if(size <= 0) return "0";
    final String[] units = new String[] { "B", "kB", "MB", "GB", "TB" };
    int digitGroups = (int) (Math.log10(size)/Math.log10(1024));
    return new DecimalFormat("#,##0.#").format(size/Math.pow(1024, digitGroups)) + " " + units[digitGroups];
}

This will work up to 1000 TB.... and the program is short!

| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Agree, should be the correct answer. Look here for an even better output. – Kariem Aug 8 '11 at 17:03
  • 4
    final String[] units = new String[] { "B", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB", "EB" }; // now it works up to Long.MAX_VALUE! – Joe Jul 6 '12 at 23:49
  • 29
    To comply with international standards: final String[] units = new String[] { "B", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB", "PB", "EB" }; /* used with 1000 * / final String[] units = new String[] { "Bi", "KiB", "MiB", "GiB", "TiB", "PiB", "EiB" }; /* used with 1024 */ See: physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html – Mr Ed Jul 7 '12 at 12:07
  • 3
    and reverse function?... – nefo_x Dec 12 '13 at 15:31
  • 2
    A small comment: "kilo" is expressed with a lowercase 'k' and not an uppercase 'K'. – Willem Van Onsem Oct 30 '14 at 0:45
8

You'll probably have more luck with java.text.DecimalFormat. This code should probably do it (just winging it though...)

new DecimalFormat("#,##0.#").format(value) + " " + unit

| improve this answer | |
2

Surprisingly for me but loop based algorithm is about 10% faster.

public static String toNumInUnits(long bytes) {
    int u = 0;
    for (;bytes > 1024*1024; bytes >>= 10) {
        u++;
    }
    if (bytes > 1024)
        u++;
    return String.format("%.1f %cB", bytes/1024f, " kMGTPE".charAt(u));
}
| improve this answer | |
  • 3
    Everything is loop based at the bottom. – Evgeni Sergeev Jun 29 '14 at 1:57

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