131

I need to display a file size as a string using sensible units.

For example,

1L ==> "1 B";
1024L ==> "1 KB";
2537253L ==> "2.3 MB"

etc.

I found this previous answer, which I didn't find satisfactory.

I have come up with my own solution which has similar shortcomings:

private static final long K = 1024;
private static final long M = K * K;
private static final long G = M * K;
private static final long T = G * K;

public static String convertToStringRepresentation(final long value){
    final long[] dividers = new long[] { T, G, M, K, 1 };
    final String[] units = new String[] { "TB", "GB", "MB", "KB", "B" };
    if(value < 1)
        throw new IllegalArgumentException("Invalid file size: " + value);
    String result = null;
    for(int i = 0; i < dividers.length; i++){
        final long divider = dividers[i];
        if(value >= divider){
            result = format(value, divider, units[i]);
            break;
        }
    }
    return result;
}

private static String format(final long value,
    final long divider,
    final String unit){
    final double result =
        divider > 1 ? (double) value / (double) divider : (double) value;
    return String.format("%.1f %s", Double.valueOf(result), unit);
}

The main problem is my limited knowledge of Decimalformat and / or String.format. I would like 1024L, 1025L, etc. to map to 1 KB rather than 1.0 KB.

So, two possibilities:

  1. I would prefer a good out-of-the-box solution in a public library like Apache Commons or Google Guava.
  2. If there isn't, how can I get rid of the '.0' part (without resorting to string replacement and regex, I can do that myself)?
387
public static String readableFileSize(long size) {
    if(size <= 0) return "0";
    final String[] units = new String[] { "B", "kB", "MB", "GB", "TB" };
    int digitGroups = (int) (Math.log10(size)/Math.log10(1024));
    return new DecimalFormat("#,##0.#").format(size/Math.pow(1024, digitGroups)) + " " + units[digitGroups];
}

This will work up to 1000 TB.... and the program is short!

  • 3
    Agree, should be the correct answer. Look here for an even better output. – Kariem Aug 8 '11 at 17:03
  • 4
    final String[] units = new String[] { "B", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB", "EB" }; // now it works up to Long.MAX_VALUE! – Joe Jul 6 '12 at 23:49
  • 30
    To comply with international standards: final String[] units = new String[] { "B", "KB", "MB", "GB", "TB", "PB", "EB" }; /* used with 1000 * / final String[] units = new String[] { "Bi", "KiB", "MiB", "GiB", "TiB", "PiB", "EiB" }; /* used with 1024 */ See: physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/binary.html – Mr Ed Jul 7 '12 at 12:07
  • 3
    and reverse function?... – nefo_x Dec 12 '13 at 15:31
  • 2
    A small comment: "kilo" is expressed with a lowercase 'k' and not an uppercase 'K'. – Willem Van Onsem Oct 30 '14 at 0:45
8

You'll probably have more luck with java.text.DecimalFormat. This code should probably do it (just winging it though...)

new DecimalFormat("#,##0.#").format(value) + " " + unit

  • Does it work as required? – Peter Mortensen Aug 12 '20 at 19:38
  • Strangely enough, after ten years, I haven't gone back and tested this. Try it yourself and see... – Robert Watkins Aug 14 '20 at 5:37
4

It is surprising for me, but a loop-based algorithm is about 10% faster.

public static String toNumInUnits(long bytes) {
    int u = 0;
    for ( ; bytes > 1024*1024; bytes >>= 10) {
        u++;
    }
    if (bytes > 1024)
        u++;
    return String.format("%.1f %cB", bytes/1024f, " kMGTPE".charAt(u));
}
  • 4
    Everything is loop based at the bottom. – Evgeni Sergeev Jun 29 '14 at 1:57
  • @Evgeni Sergeev: What do you mean? Can you elaborate? – Peter Mortensen Aug 12 '20 at 19:39

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