9
for {
  a <- Some(1)
  b <- Some(2)
} yield (a, b)

returns Some((1, 2))

for {
  a <- Right(1).right
  b <- Left(2).left
} yield (a, b)

returns Left((1, 2))


Now I want to decompose tuples in the for comprehension.

for {
  (a, b) <- Some((1, 2))
  (c, d) <- Some((3, 4))
} yield (a, b, c, d)

returns Some((1, 2, 3, 4))

for {
  (a, b) <- Right((1, 2)).right
  (c, d) <- Left((3, 4)).left
} yield (a, b, c, d)

fails to compile:

error: constructor cannot be instantiated to expected type;
found   : (T1, T2)
required: scala.util.Either[Nothing,(Int, Int)]
                   (a, b) <- Right((1, 2)).right

error: constructor cannot be instantiated to expected type;
found   : (T1, T2)
required: scala.util.Either[(Int, Int),Nothing]

Why doesn't this last example work? What is the difference?

  • 1
    There is a bug reported for this issue. – emilianogc Sep 18 '15 at 17:28
7

This is a bug:

SI-5589: For-comprehension on Either.RightProjection with Tuple2 extractor in generator fails to compile

withFilter() is called (some documentation references filter(), but that was changed in 2.8), which messes with the type inference.

withFilter() is used for things like for(a <- b if c), though according to the 6.19 it shouldn't be used in this case.

This latter bug is captured in SI-1336: spec requires type checking of for-comprehension to consider refutability, which has been open for seven years (2008).

Perhaps some future generation will find the fix.


See why does filter have to be defined for pattern matching in a for loop in scala?

|improve this answer|||||
4

Because the generators for (Any, Any) <- Either are not "irrefutable" filters are added into the desugared code (why does filter have to be defined for pattern matching in a for loop in scala?), resulting in:

Right((1, 2)).right.filter { case (a, b) => true; case _ => false }.flatMap({
  case(a, b) => Left((3, 4)).left.filter { case (c, d) => true; case _ => false }.map({case (c, d) =>
    (a, b, c, d)
  })
})

The filters are where the compilation error occurs because the filter method for Right looks like this (the Left one is similar):

def filter[X](p: B => Boolean): Option[Either[X, B]] = e match {
  case Left(_) => None
  case Right(b) => if(p(b)) Some(Right(b)) else None
}

Which means that the compiler is trying to do the following:

(T1, T2) match {
  case Left(_) => None
  case Right(b) => if(p(b)) Some(Right(b)) else None
}

Which fails since (T1, T2) cannot be cast into Either[A, B] (what Right extends) where A is Nothing and B is (Int, Int).

You can get something close to this by using:

for {
  a <- Right((1, 2)).right
  b <- Left((3, 4)).left
} yield (a, b) match {
  case ((c, d), (e, f)) => (c, d, e, f)
  case _ => 
}
|improve this answer|||||
3

This might be a limitation of for expressions. Translating

for {
  (a, b) <- Some((1, 2))
  (c, d) <- Some((3, 4))
} yield (a, b, c, d)

into

Some((1, 2)).flatMap({case(a, b) =>
  Some((3, 4)).map({case (c, d) =>
    (a, b, c, d)
  })
})

works both ways. With the Either expression, only the map/flatMap version works.

for {
  (a, b) <- Right((1, 2)).right
  (c, d) <- Left((3, 4)).left
} yield (a, b, c, d)


Right((1, 2)).right.flatMap({
  case(a, b) => Left((3, 4)).left.map({case (c, d) =>
    (a, b, c, d)
  })
})

I don't recommend using Either, instead use the \/ type from scalaz. http://eed3si9n.com/learning-scalaz/Either.html Either isn't left nor right-leaning, which is a problem because it doesn't specify where the error or the value goes.

|improve this answer|||||
  • 1
    Either might not be right or left leaning, but LeftProjection and RightProjection certainly are! – Paul Draper Sep 18 '15 at 12:31
  • 1
    @PaulDraper yes, but then you'll have to specify .right or .left every time you want to use it. And I prefer my code without noise. – Reactormonk Sep 18 '15 at 12:33

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