45

What would be the async (awaitable) equivalent of AutoResetEvent?

If in the classic thread synchronization we would use something like this:

    AutoResetEvent signal = new AutoResetEvent(false);

    void Thread1Proc()
    {
        //do some stuff
        //..
        //..

        signal.WaitOne(); //wait for an outer thread to signal we are good to continue

        //do some more stuff
        //..
        //..
    }

    void Thread2Proc()
    {
        //do some stuff
        //..
        //..

        signal.Set(); //signal the other thread it's good to go

        //do some more stuff
        //..
        //..
    }

I was hoping that in the new async way of doing things, something like this would come to be:

SomeAsyncAutoResetEvent asyncSignal = new SomeAsyncAutoResetEvent();

async void Task1Proc()
{
    //do some stuff
    //..
    //..

    await asyncSignal.WaitOne(); //wait for an outer thread to signal we are good to continue

    //do some more stuff
    //..
    //..
}

async void Task2Proc()
{
    //do some stuff
    //..
    //..

    asyncSignal.Set(); //signal the other thread it's good to go

    //do some more stuff
    //..
    //..
}

I've seen other custom made solutions, but what I've managed to get my hands on, at some point in time, still involves locking a thread. I don't want this just for the sake of using the new await syntax. I'm looking for a true awaitable signaling mechanism which does not lock any thread.

Is it something I'm missing in the Task Parallel Library?

EDIT: Just to make clear: SomeAsyncAutoResetEvent is an entirely made up class name used as a placeholder in my example.

6
  • For one-time-use, a TaskCompletionSource whose result is ignored by the awaiting task. Sep 18, 2015 at 14:41
  • gist.github.com/AArnott/1084951 maybe? Sep 18, 2015 at 14:49
  • @MatthewWatson I see it uses a lock, which will block a thread from the thread pool. I was hoping for something not involving a blocked thread. Sep 18, 2015 at 15:16
  • 1
    A lock doesn't necessarily mean a thread is blocked. Sep 18, 2015 at 16:00
  • @DarkFalcon True. And in this case it might even not block any thread. Sep 18, 2015 at 16:47

9 Answers 9

33

If you want to build your own, Stephen Toub has the definitive blog post on the subject.

If you want to use one that's already written, I have one in my AsyncEx library. AFAIK, there's no other option as of the time of this writing.

6
  • 3
    Why wouldn't a new SemaphoreSlim(1) work, WaitOne() is WaitAsync() and Set() becomes Release() Nov 2, 2016 at 21:40
  • 2
    AREs and Semaphores are very similar (though usually used differently). The semantic difference comes in if the primitive is signalled when it is already set. Nov 3, 2016 at 1:01
  • 1
    @AshleyJackson: That approach does use another thread. Some synchronization primitives do not allow this (e.g., Mutex, Monitor), but since this is an AutoResetEvent, it should work. Jan 25, 2019 at 17:44
  • 5
    I think those who are named "Stephen" are born for asynchronous anything. Jan 27, 2019 at 7:12
  • 8
    Stephen Toubs post seems to have been moved here
    – Klepto
    Aug 6, 2020 at 8:36
23

Here's the source for Stephen Toub's AsyncAutoResetEvent, in case his blog goes offline.

public class AsyncAutoResetEvent
{
    private static readonly Task s_completed = Task.FromResult(true);
    private readonly Queue<TaskCompletionSource<bool>> m_waits = new Queue<TaskCompletionSource<bool>>();
    private bool m_signaled;

    public Task WaitAsync()
    {
        lock (m_waits)
        {
            if (m_signaled)
            {
                m_signaled = false;
                return s_completed;
            }
            else
            {
                var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
                m_waits.Enqueue(tcs);
                return tcs.Task;
            }
        }
    }

    public void Set()
    {
        TaskCompletionSource<bool> toRelease = null;

        lock (m_waits)
        {
            if (m_waits.Count > 0)
                toRelease = m_waits.Dequeue();
            else if (!m_signaled)
                m_signaled = true;
        }

        toRelease?.SetResult(true);
    }
}
5
  • Why can you use regular lock in awaitable code? Can't the same task continue as a different thread here and go around the lock? Jul 11, 2019 at 14:52
  • 3
    @user1713059 note that WaitAsync isn't actually an async method. That means it doesn't yield control midway through processing. Instead, it obtains a Task from the TaskCompletionSource and returns it before releasing the lock. Jul 17, 2019 at 1:23
  • Ah sure, so even if I do "await WaitAsync()" it is sure that the whole method gets executed by the same thread, because it's not actually async - is that right? The "Async" method suffix led me astray, but from what I see it's used in methods without the "async" keyword too. Jul 18, 2019 at 20:22
  • 1
    It's still an asynchronous method because it returns a task which may not be completed by the time the method returns. However the method is not async, which means the method won't yield at some point within its body while it awaits some other Task's completion. It's convention for methods that return Task (or Task<T>) to have an Async suffix. Jul 21, 2019 at 10:59
  • 1
    With respect to your original comment, the lock is released before the Task is returned to the caller, so there's no way for that caller to get around the lock. Jul 21, 2019 at 11:01
16

I think there is good example on MSDN: https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh873178%28v=vs.110%29.aspx#WHToTap

public static Task WaitOneAsync(this WaitHandle waitHandle)
{
    if (waitHandle == null) 
        throw new ArgumentNullException("waitHandle");

    var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
    var rwh = ThreadPool.RegisterWaitForSingleObject(waitHandle, 
        delegate { tcs.TrySetResult(true); }, null, -1, true);
    var t = tcs.Task;
    t.ContinueWith( (antecedent) => rwh.Unregister(null));
    return t;
}
2
  • Definitely the best answer.
    – Felix K.
    May 5, 2021 at 12:46
  • Note that this only works correctly on ManualResetEvent not AutoResetEvent. On AutoResetEvent you need to WaitOne the thing inside the delegate; else the event is still signalled next time somebody calls WaitOne on it.
    – Joshua
    Mar 16 at 16:42
8

Here is a version I cooked up which allows you to specify a timeout. It is derived from Stephen Toub's solution. We currently use this in production workloads.

public class AsyncAutoResetEvent
{
    readonly LinkedList<TaskCompletionSource<bool>> waiters = 
        new LinkedList<TaskCompletionSource<bool>>();

    bool isSignaled;

    public AsyncAutoResetEvent(bool signaled)
    {
        this.isSignaled = signaled;
    }

    public Task<bool> WaitAsync(TimeSpan timeout)
    {
        return this.WaitAsync(timeout, CancellationToken.None);
    }

    public async Task<bool> WaitAsync(TimeSpan timeout, CancellationToken cancellationToken)
    {
        TaskCompletionSource<bool> tcs;

        lock (this.waiters)
        {
            if (this.isSignaled)
            {
                this.isSignaled = false;
                return true;
            }
            else if (timeout == TimeSpan.Zero)
            {
                return this.isSignaled;
            }
            else
            {
                tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();
                this.waiters.AddLast(tcs);
            }
        }

        Task winner = await Task.WhenAny(tcs.Task, Task.Delay(timeout, cancellationToken));
        if (winner == tcs.Task)
        {
            // The task was signaled.
            return true;
        }
        else
        {
            // We timed-out; remove our reference to the task.
            // This is an O(n) operation since waiters is a LinkedList<T>.
            lock (this.waiters)
            {
                bool removed = this.waiters.Remove(tcs);
                Debug.Assert(removed);
                return false;
            }
        }
    }

    public void Set()
    {
        lock (this.waiters)
        {
            if (this.waiters.Count > 0)
            {
                // Signal the first task in the waiters list. This must be done on a new
                // thread to avoid stack-dives and situations where we try to complete the
                // same result multiple times.
                TaskCompletionSource<bool> tcs = this.waiters.First.Value;
                Task.Run(() => tcs.SetResult(true));
                this.waiters.RemoveFirst();
            }
            else if (!this.isSignaled)
            {
                // No tasks are pending
                this.isSignaled = true;
            }
        }
    }

    public override string ToString()
    {
        return $"Signaled: {this.isSignaled.ToString()}, Waiters: {this.waiters.Count.ToString()}";
    }
}
6
  • 1
    I think this.waiters should be lock'ed at the in the Remove(tcs) manipulation path?
    – HelloSam
    May 9, 2017 at 7:37
  • @HelloSam I think you are right! Fixed. Thanks for pointing this out. May 11, 2017 at 18:33
  • I don't have a lot of time to debug this, but, be forewarned: i am getting dead-lock using this. When a new thread calls event.Set(), it hangs on toRelease.SetResult(true);
    – Andy
    Dec 11, 2018 at 4:37
  • 1
    @Andy thanks for the comment. There is an additional fix I made since I originally posted this which I suspect addresses your deadlock (in my case, it was a StackOverflowException). The fix was to wrap the SetResult(true) call in a Task.Run(...). Dec 12, 2018 at 20:51
  • Am I mistaken or is it not auto-resetting where it returns true after if (winner == tcs.Task)? Oct 7, 2021 at 21:31
1

I was also looking for an AsyncAutoResetEvent class and it seems there is now one available in namespace Microsoft.VisualStudio.Threading

// Summary:
//     An asynchronous implementation of an AutoResetEvent.
[DebuggerDisplay("Signaled: {signaled}")]
public class AsyncAutoResetEvent
0

It also works, but this way may fade the purpose of using async and await.

AutoResetEvent asyncSignal = new AutoResetEvent();

async void Task1Proc()
{
    //do some stuff
    //..
    //..

    await Task.Run(() => asyncSignal.WaitOne()); //wait for an outer thread to signal we are good to continue

    //do some more stuff
    //..
    //..
}
3
  • Why is this considered bad?
    – Yarek T
    Feb 1, 2021 at 11:59
  • @YarekT I remembered the reason at the time I wrote this answer months ago, but not now. I don't think this is bad, though there are more than one context switching (by WaitOne() and by await keyword) performance issue in this. Feb 2, 2021 at 22:02
  • 1
    No worries. I've been recently looking more into Tasks in C#. From what I can gather its bad because it wastes a thread by creating one, then immediately making it blocked by the wait. I've seen a a few solutions floating around that avoid this by somehow using a timer, but they all seem very complicated. Anyway, heres an upvote
    – Yarek T
    Feb 12, 2021 at 9:05
0

I extended the example from MSDN provided by Oleg Gordeev with an optional Timeout (ms):

public static Task WaitOneAsync(this WaitHandle waitHandle, double timeout = 0)
        {
            if (waitHandle == null) throw new ArgumentNullException("waitHandle");

            var tcs = new TaskCompletionSource<bool>();

            if (timeout > 0) 
            {
                var timer = new System.Timers.Timer(timeout) 
                { Enabled = true, AutoReset = false };

                ElapsedEventHandler del = default;
                del = delegate (object x, System.Timers.ElapsedEventArgs y)
                {
                    tcs.TrySetResult(true);
                    timer.Elapsed -= del; 
                    timer.Dispose();
                };

                timer.Elapsed += del;
            }
        
            var rwh = ThreadPool.RegisterWaitForSingleObject(waitHandle,
                      delegate { tcs.TrySetResult(true); },
                      null, -1, true);

            var t = tcs.Task;
            t.ContinueWith((antecedent) => rwh.Unregister(null));

            return t;
        }
0

Here's my COMPLETE implementation using SemaphoreSlim, using all SemaphoreSlim.WaitAsync overrides:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Threading;
using System.Threading.Tasks;

/// <summary>
/// Represents an event that, when signaled, resets automatically after releasing a single waiting task.
/// </summary>
public sealed class AutoResetEventAsync : IDisposable {

    /// <summary>
    /// Waits asynchronously until a signal is received.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>Task completed when the event is signaled.</returns>
    public async ValueTask WaitAsync() {
        if (CheckSignaled()) return;
        SemaphoreSlim s;
        lock (Q) Q.Enqueue(s = new(0, 1));
        await s.WaitAsync();
        lock (Q) if (Q.Count > 0 && Q.Peek() == s) Q.Dequeue().Dispose();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Waits asynchronously until a signal is received or the time runs out.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="millisecondsTimeout">The number of milliseconds to wait, <see cref="System.Threading.Timeout.Infinite"/>
    /// (-1) to wait indefinitely, or zero to return immediately.</param>
    /// <returns>Task completed when the event is signaled or the time runs out.</returns>
    public async ValueTask WaitAsync(int millisecondsTimeout) {
        if (CheckSignaled()) return;
        SemaphoreSlim s;
        lock (Q) Q.Enqueue(s = new(0, 1));
        await s.WaitAsync(millisecondsTimeout);
        lock (Q) if (Q.Count > 0 && Q.Peek() == s) Q.Dequeue().Dispose();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Waits asynchronously until a signal is received, the time runs out or the token is cancelled.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="millisecondsTimeout">The number of milliseconds to wait, <see cref="System.Threading.Timeout.Infinite"/>
    /// (-1) to wait indefinitely, or zero to return immediately.</param>
    /// <param name="cancellationToken">The <see cref="System.Threading.CancellationToken"/> to observe.</param>
    /// <returns>Task completed when the event is signaled, the time runs out or the token is cancelled.</returns>
    public async ValueTask WaitAsync(int millisecondsTimeout, CancellationToken cancellationToken) {
        if (CheckSignaled()) return;
        SemaphoreSlim s;
        lock (Q) Q.Enqueue(s = new(0, 1));
        try {
            await s.WaitAsync(millisecondsTimeout, cancellationToken);
        }
        finally {
            lock (Q) if (Q.Count > 0 && Q.Peek() == s) Q.Dequeue().Dispose();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Waits asynchronously until a signal is received or the token is cancelled.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="cancellationToken">The <see cref="System.Threading.CancellationToken"/> to observe.</param>
    /// <returns>Task completed when the event is signaled or the token is cancelled.</returns>
    public async ValueTask WaitAsync(CancellationToken cancellationToken) {
        if (CheckSignaled()) return;
        SemaphoreSlim s;
        lock (Q) Q.Enqueue(s = new(0, 1));
        try {
            await s.WaitAsync(cancellationToken);
        }
        finally {
            lock (Q) if (Q.Count > 0 && Q.Peek() == s) Q.Dequeue().Dispose();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Waits asynchronously until a signal is received or the time runs out.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="timeout">A <see cref="System.TimeSpan"/> that represents the number of milliseconds to wait,
    /// a <see cref="System.TimeSpan"/> that represents -1 milliseconds to wait indefinitely, or a System.TimeSpan
    /// that represents 0 milliseconds to return immediately.</param>
    /// <returns>Task completed when the event is signaled or the time runs out.</returns>
    public async ValueTask WaitAsync(TimeSpan timeout) {
        if (CheckSignaled()) return;
        SemaphoreSlim s;
        lock (Q) Q.Enqueue(s = new(0, 1));
        await s.WaitAsync(timeout);
        lock (Q) if (Q.Count > 0 && Q.Peek() == s) Q.Dequeue().Dispose();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Waits asynchronously until a signal is received, the time runs out or the token is cancelled.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="timeout">A <see cref="System.TimeSpan"/> that represents the number of milliseconds to wait,
    /// a <see cref="System.TimeSpan"/> that represents -1 milliseconds to wait indefinitely, or a System.TimeSpan
    /// that represents 0 milliseconds to return immediately.</param>
    /// <param name="cancellationToken">The <see cref="System.Threading.CancellationToken"/> to observe.</param>
    /// <returns>Task completed when the event is signaled, the time runs out or the token is cancelled.</returns>
    public async ValueTask WaitAsync(TimeSpan timeout, CancellationToken cancellationToken) {
        if (CheckSignaled()) return;
        SemaphoreSlim s;
        lock (Q) Q.Enqueue(s = new(0, 1));
        try {
            await s.WaitAsync(timeout, cancellationToken);
        }
        finally {
            lock (Q) if (Q.Count > 0 && Q.Peek() == s) Q.Dequeue().Dispose();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Sets the state of the event to signaled, allowing one or more waiting tasks to proceed.
    /// </summary>
    public void Set() {
        SemaphoreSlim? toRelease = null;
        lock (Q) {
            if (Q.Count > 0) toRelease = Q.Dequeue();
            else if (!IsSignaled) IsSignaled = true;
        }
        toRelease?.Release();
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Sets the state of the event to non nonsignaled, making the waiting tasks to wait.
    /// </summary>
    public void Reset() => IsSignaled = false;

    /// <summary>
    /// Disposes any semaphores left in the queue.
    /// </summary>
    public void Dispose() {
        lock (Q) {
            while (Q.Count > 0) Q.Dequeue().Dispose();
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Checks the <see cref="IsSignaled"/> state and resets it when it's signaled.
    /// </summary>
    /// <returns>True if the event was in signaled state.</returns>
    private bool CheckSignaled() {
        lock (Q) {
            if (IsSignaled) {
                IsSignaled = false;
                return true;
            }
            return false;
        }
    }

    private readonly Queue<SemaphoreSlim> Q = new();
    private volatile bool IsSignaled;

}

I used SemaphoreSlim because it gives the time out and cancellation token support "for free". It could be even better if I just modified the original .NET source code of SemaphoreSlim to behave like AutoResetEvent but nah, that's it. Let me know if you find any bugs.

13
  • Is the AutoResetEventAsync class thread-safe? If yes, what can happen if two threads call WaitAsync() at the same time? Isn't it possible that both will read the IsSignaled field as true, before any of them executes the IsSignaled = false; line? Also the if (Q.Contains(s)) Q.Dequeue().Dispose(); line searches if the s exists in the queue, and then dequeues and disposes some other semaphore (most likely). Is this intentional? Sep 12, 2021 at 17:07
  • @TheodorZoulias : Yes, because even if 2 threads can enter WaitAsync at the same time, they cannot pass the Q access at the same time. Notice that Q can be only accessed with a single thread. That makes the flow simple and direct. This also implies the internal await is accessible to a single thread only. Thus, it is impossible invalid semaphore is dequeued. The multiple tests I performed on this class haven't yet fail, but this doesn't prove it's valid. I think that the single tread access to Q does.
    – Harry
    Sep 15, 2021 at 5:58
  • 1
    I am talking about this line: if (IsSignaled) { IsSignaled = false; return; }. This is not protected by a lock. The IsSignaled is not even a volatile field. As for the if (Q.Contains(s)), if you are sure that the s can only be in the head of the queue, if (Q.Peak() == s) would be faster and more expressive regarding the intentions of the code. Btw what will happen if the cancellationToken is canceled and the WaitAsync throws? Sep 15, 2021 at 6:28
  • You've found some interesting edge cases. I'll try to fix them and edit my example... BRB.
    – Harry
    Sep 15, 2021 at 19:07
  • 1
    Thank you for the insight, I will use the better version with your extension then. Anyway, it was totally worth it as a learning experience. You're MVP.
    – Harry
    Sep 16, 2021 at 15:28
-1

Here is my version of one-time event can be await by multiple threads. It internally relies on BoundedChannel.

public class AsyncOneTimeEvent<T>
{
    private T Result { get; set; }

    private readonly Channel<bool> _channel = Channel.CreateBounded<bool>(new BoundedChannelOptions(1)
    {
        SingleReader = false,
        SingleWriter = true,
        FullMode = BoundedChannelFullMode.DropWrite,
    });

    public async Task<T> GetResult()
    {
        await _channel.Reader.WaitToReadAsync().ConfigureAwait(false);

        return this.Result;
    }

    public void SetResult(T result)
    {
        this.Result = result;
        _channel.Writer.Complete();
    }

    public void SetError(Exception ex)
    {
        _channel.Writer.Complete(ex);
    }
}
4
  • Using a Channel as a substitute of a TaskCompletionSource seems like a clever idea. But is also unnecessary, and the implementation seems susceptible to visibility problems. I am not sure that all threads will "see" the latest value of the non-volatile private T Result field in all cases. Jan 6, 2021 at 13:30
  • Example: Thread A enters the GetResult() method, reads the value of Result in an out-of-order fashion, and then gets suspended by the OS. Thread B enters and exits the SetResult method. Thread A resumes, executes synchronously the await _channel.Reader.WaitToReadAsync() line, and returns a Task having default(T) as its value. Is this scenario impossible based on the C# ECMA-334 specification? I have no idea! Jan 6, 2021 at 13:42
  • @TheodorZoulias certainly it works, you can try it online : dotnetfiddle.net/uyQRG1 Jan 7, 2021 at 11:24
  • I am sure that it works. I am not sure that it is guaranteed to work correctly on all CPU architectures. Visibility problems are notoriously difficult to debug. You can read this article by Igor Ostrovsky to get an idea why. Jan 7, 2021 at 14:42

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