130

In bash, what's the difference, if any, between the equal and double equal test operators?

[[ "a" = "a" ]] && echo equal || echo not-equal
[[ "a" == "a" ]] && echo equal || echo not-equal
[[ "a" = "b" ]] && echo equal || echo not-equal
[[ "a" == "b" ]] && echo equal || echo not-equal

results in:

equal
equal
not-equal
not-equal
124

There's no difference, == is a synonym for = (for the C/C++ people, I assume). See here, for example.

You could double-check just to be really sure or just for your interest by looking at the bash source code, should be somewhere in the parsing code there, but I couldn't find it straightaway.

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  • 25
    There's no difference for string comparisons, but you can't use = for numeric comparisons in (()) (you must use == in (()) or -eq in [], test or [[]]. See my answer here. – Paused until further notice. Jul 16 '10 at 20:52
  • 24
    It's also worth noting that == was introduced in bash, but bourne shell does not support it. In some systems, you'll notice that /bin/sh is actually bash, and in other systems, it's bourne. I ran into that problem when a shell script worked correctly on multiple systems, but failed on one. The == being unsupported in bourne was the reason it failed on the one. – Joe Aug 24 '10 at 0:12
  • 4
    Note, in ksh if you check the syntax, you get a depreciation warning with the single = syntax. warning: line 3: '=' obsolete, use '==' – brianegge Aug 8 '13 at 0:24
  • 5
    There's no difference IN BASH. == does not work in all shells, hence not portable. Prefer =. – mak Sep 18 '16 at 20:38
  • As @mak pointed out, == doesn't work in all shells, I confirmed that in Ubuntu 16.04 == doesn't work. – Yingpei Zeng Mar 16 '17 at 1:26

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