I'd like to use the new San Francisco font on a site. I've tried:

font: 'San Francisco', Helvetica, Arial, san-serif;

to no avail. I have tried the answers to this question, but @font-face is not the solution here.

  • @Sparky I'm specifically asking about the SF font, and there's a specific way to do that. – inorganik Sep 18 '15 at 22:02
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    Website fonts either depend on what's installed in the user's system or they are loaded externally. It's pretty straightforward stuff, especially if the font is made available for use. – Sparky Sep 18 '15 at 22:04
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    @Sparky you can't argue that there is a very unique specific way to use SF, which is what I'm asking how to do. The answer I provided, using -apple-system as a value for font or font-family is a solution for using SF font, and only the SF font, which I asked about. – inorganik Sep 18 '15 at 22:06
  • @inorganik Sorry I got confused rapidly switching between SO question! Apologies, will delete. – Benjamin R Dec 13 '16 at 20:11
up vote 154 down vote accepted

Apple's new system font is not publicly exposed. Apple has started abstracting system font names:

The motivation for this abstraction is so the operating system can make better choices on which face to use at a given weight. Apple is also working on font features, such as selectable “6″ and “9″ glyphs or non-monospaced numbers. It’s my guess that they’d like to bring these features to the web, as well.

Safari and Firefox use SF for -apple-system; Chrome recognizes BlinkMacSystemFont:

body {
    font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, sans-serif;
}

There are also other variations:

font-family: -apple-system-body
font-family: -apple-system-headline
font-family: -apple-system-subheadline
font-family: -apple-system-caption1
font-family: -apple-system-caption2
font-family: -apple-system-footnote
font-family: -apple-system-short-body
font-family: -apple-system-short-headline
font-family: -apple-system-short-subheadline
font-family: -apple-system-short-caption1
font-family: -apple-system-short-footnote
font-family: -apple-system-tall-body

You can demo these at the following fiddle; most are not supported yet: http://jsfiddle.net/v94gw9nx/

I got my info from Craig Hockenberry's article which has a lot of great info about using the font: http://furbo.org/2015/07/09/i-left-my-system-fonts-in-san-francisco/

Also, some great info on the Surfin' Safari blog about using abstracted system fonts: https://www.webkit.org/blog/3709/using-the-system-font-in-web-content/

And apparently Apple is working with the W3C to standardize using a generic "system" font name in CSS. https://lists.w3.org/Archives/Public/www-style/2015Jul/0169.html

Download the SF font .otf files for your own personal use: https://developer.apple.com/fonts/

None of the current answers including the accepted one will use Apple's San Francisco font on systems that don't have it installed as the system font. Since the question isn't "how do I use the OS X system font on a webpage" the correct solution is to use web fonts:

@font-face {
  font-family: "San Francisco";
  font-weight: 400;
  src: url("https://applesocial.s3.amazonaws.com/assets/styles/fonts/sanfrancisco/sanfranciscodisplay-regular-webfont.woff");
}

Source

  • 4
    Hmm I don't see the SF font anywhere on that tumblr. – inorganik Apr 8 '16 at 23:00
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    Me neither, @inorganik, thanks for pointing that out. I was just basing my comment on the linked gist. Perhaps Apple changed the fonts since that gist was published. – Ilias Karim Apr 8 '16 at 23:14

-apple-system allows you to pick San Francisco in Safari. BlinkMacSystemFont is the corresponding alternative for Chrome.

font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont, sans-serif;

Roboto or Helvetica Neue could be inserted as fallbacks even before sans-serif.

https://www.smashingmagazine.com/2015/11/using-system-ui-fonts-practical-guide/#details-of-approach-a (how or previously http://furbo.org/2015/07/09/i-left-my-system-fonts-in-san-francisco/ do a great job explaining the details.

Last time tested on: March 2018


To address the question

How to use Apple's new San Francisco font on a webpage

font-family: -apple-system, system-ui, BlinkMacSystemFont;

or (even shorter):

font-family: -apple-system, BlinkMacSystemFont;

should suffice.

If you want to default to system font on multiple platforms, though, I'd suggest:

font-family: -apple-system, system-ui, BlinkMacSystemFont, "Segoe UI", Roboto, Ubuntu;
  • -apple-system — San Francisco in Safari (on Mac OS X and iOS); Neue Helvetica and Lucida Grande on older versions of Mac OS X.
  • system-ui — default UI font on a given platform.
  • BlinkMacSystemFont — equivalent of -apple-system, for Chrome on Mac OS X.
  • "Segoe UI" — Windows (Vista+) and Windows Phone.
  • Roboto — Android (Ice Cream Sandwich (4.0)+) and Chrome OS.
  • Ubuntu — all versions of Ubuntu.

The idea is borrowed from the following issue on github.

You can look up fonts for other OS or older versions of them in this article on css-tricks.

If the user is running El Capitan or higher, it will work in Chrome with

font-family: 'BlinkMacSystemFont';
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    Do you have a link to any official (or otherwise) documentation about this? – Moshe Katz Feb 9 '16 at 22:23
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    Can confirm this works with Chrome. Pretty cool! – Erick Mar 29 '16 at 20:46

Apple is abstracting the system fonts going forward. This facility uses new generic family name -apple-system. So something like below should get you what you want.

body 
{
  font-family: -apple-system, "Helvetica Neue", "Lucida Grande";
}
  • What about HTML canvas? – clearlight Jan 2 '16 at 1:16

Work with Chrome/Safari

body { font-family: '.SFNSDisplay-Regular', sans-serif; }
  • A code block alone does not provide a good answer. Please add explanations. – Louis Barranqueiro Dec 12 '15 at 13:47
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    This is the only one that worked for me on an Atom syntax stylesheet. – Kai Mar 21 '16 at 2:38
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    Note that this doesn't work in iOS while -apple-system, 'BlinkMacSystemFont' works in iOS Chrome + Safari and OS X Chrome + Safari. – Charlie Schliesser Aug 23 '16 at 21:07
  • It is a bad idea to ever reference the macOS/iOS system font names directly as they could change, requiring time and effort on your part when/if it happens. (Additionally, native apps that do this on iOS at least theoretically are supposed to crash. Moral: don’t do it.) – Jonathan Thornton Dec 18 '17 at 22:29
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    Also, I should point out that the reason that this doesn’t work on iOS is because the system fonts begin with .SFNS on macOS while they begin with .SFUI on iOS. If you absolutely must do this for some reason, that’d fix it…but don’t do it! – Jonathan Thornton Dec 18 '17 at 22:31

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