28

I'm working on a section of code that has many possible failure points which cause it to exit the function early. The libraries I'm interacting with require that C-style arrays be passed to the functions. So, instead of calling delete on the arrays at every exit point, I'm doing this:

void SomeFunction(int arrayLength)
{
   shared_ptr<char> raiiArray(new char[arrayLength]);
   pArray = raiiArray.get();

   if(SomeFunctionThatRequiresCArray(pArray) == FAILED) { return; }

   //etc.
}

I wanted to use unique_ptr, but my current compiler doesn't support it and the reference count overhead doesn't really matter in this case.

I'm just wondering if anyone has any thoughts on this practice when interfacing with legacy code.

UPDATE I completely forgot about the shared_ptr calling delete instead of delete []. I just saw no memory leaks and decided to go with it. Didn't even think to use a vector. Since I've been delving into new (for me) C++ lately I'm thinking I've got a case of the "If the only tool you have is a hammer, everything looks like a nail." syndrome. Thanks for the feedback.

UPDATE2 I figured I'd change the question and provide an answer to make it a little more valuable to someone making the same mistake I did. Although there are alternatives like scoped_array, shared_array and vector, you can use a shared_ptr to manage scope of an array (but after this I have no idea why I would want to):

template <typename T>
    class ArrayDeleter
    {
    public:
        void operator () (T* d) const
        {
            delete [] d;
        }
    };

void SomeFunction(int arrayLength)
    {
       shared_ptr<char> raiiArray(new char[arrayLength], ArrayDeleter<char>());
       pArray = raiiArray.get();

       if(SomeFunctionThatRequiresCArray(pArray) == FAILED) { return; }

       //etc.
    }
1
  • 1
    nitpicking: [[shared_ptr]] does not work correctly on dynamic array pointers. use [[scoped_array]] or [[shared_array]].
    – rwong
    Jul 16 '10 at 15:36
28

Do not use shared_ptr or scoped_ptr to hold pointers to dynamically allocated arrays. shared_ptr and scoped_ptr use delete ptr; to clean-up when the pointer is no longer referenced/goes out of scope, which invoked undefined behaviour on a dynamically allocated array. Instead, use shared_array or scoped_array, which correctly use delete[] ptr; when destructing.

To answer your question, if you are not going to pass the smart pointer around, use scoped_array, as it has less overhead than shared_array.

Alternatively, use std::vector as the array storage (vectors have guaranteed contiguous memory allocation).

2
  • 9
    By default, shared_ptr and scoped_ptr use delete ptr, but you can provide your own deleter function or functor.
    – George
    Sep 14 '15 at 14:02
  • One more disadvantage is unable to use [] operator. eg: cannot use raaiArray[index] instead raaiArray.get()[index]
    – user5806421
    Sep 13 '19 at 12:09
15

Use boost::scoped_array, or even better std::vector if you are dealing with an array.

7

I highly recommend simply using a std::vector. Elements in vectors are allocated on the heap, and will be deleted when the vector goes out of scope, wherever you exit the function.

In order to pass a vector to legacy code requiring C-style arrays, simply pass &vectorName[0]. The elements are guaranteed to be contiguous in memory.

1
  • Ensure the vector is not empty before using &vectorName[0] or &vectorName.front(), since it's undefined or asserting behavior for some implementations. Jul 16 '10 at 17:18
6

Some remarks for C++11 users:

For shared_ptr, there is in C++11 a default deleter for array types defined in <memory> and standard compliant (wrt the final draft) so it can be used without additional fancy deleters for such cases:

std::shared_ptr<char> raiiArray(new char[arrayLength], std::default_delete<char[]>()); 

unique_ptr in C++11 has a partial specialization to deal with new[] and delete[]. But it does not have a shared behavior, unfortunately. Must be a good reason there is no such specialization for shared_ptr but I didn't look for it, if you know it, please share it.

1
  • 1
    According to this SO answer, the ultimate reason there's no array specialization for shared_ptr is that "[T]here was never an actual written proposal in front of the LWG to do this." Jan 19 '14 at 14:00
5

There's boost::scoped_ptr for this.

1
  • Yes, sure, they are both there. Thanks. Jul 16 '10 at 15:39
3

This

shared_ptr<char*> raiiArray(new char[arrayLength]);

is not a good practice, but causes undefined behaviour, as you allocate with operator new[], but shared_ptr uses operator delete to free the memory. The right thing to use is boost::shared_array or add a custom deleter.

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