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i'm very new to javascript. i'm wondering why the code blow will give two different results between safari and chrome.

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
  <head>
    <h1> test </h1>
  </head>
  <body>
    <div id='test'> </div>
    <div id='num0' style='display:none'> number one</div>
    <div id='num1' style='display:none'> number two</div>

    <script type="text/javascript">
      for (var i = 0; i <2; i++){
        const data = document.getElementById("num"+i).innerHTML;
        var newDiv = document.createElement("div");
        newDiv.id = i;
        newDiv.innerHTML = data;
        document.getElementById('test').appendChild(newDiv);
      }
    </script>
  </body>
</html>

safari:

test
number one
number two

chrome:

test
number one
number one

it seems safari ignored the const qualifier. is this a undefined behavior? what happened under the hood?

  • const is not yet universally implemented. – jfriend00 Sep 19 '15 at 7:20
2

Safari's behavior is right. const is block-scoped, so whenever the loop is repeated, the const-qualified variable of the previous iteration is no longer available, so the new const data declaration can succeed - just like let. In strict mode, Chrome also behaves like Safari.

In non-strict mode, Chrome uses a legacy form of const, where the (const) variable declaration is hoisted and attempts to update the variable are silently ignored.

Example:

function log(msg) {
    document.body.appendChild(document.createElement('div')).textContent = msg;
}
(function() { // Chrome 45 (BAD) : 0 0 0
    log('No strict mode');
    for (var i = 0; i < 2; ++i) {
        const data = i;
        log(data);
    }
    try {
        log(data); // Should fail
    } catch (e) { log(e); }
})();
(function() { // Chrome 45 (GOOD): 0 1 ReferenceError: data is not defined
    'use strict';
    log('In strict mode');
    for (var i = 0; i < 2; ++i) {
        const data = i;
        log(data);
    }
    try {
        log(data); // Should fail
    } catch (e) { log(e); }
})();

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