108

I have a makefile structured something like this:

all : 
    compile executable

clean :
    rm -f *.o $(EXEC)

I realized that I was consistently running "make clean" followed by "clear" in my terminal before running "make all". I like to have a clean terminal before I try and sift through nasty C++ compilation errors. So I tried to add a 3rd target:

fresh :
    rm -f *.o $(EXEC)
    clear
    make all

This works, however this runs a second instance of make (I believe). Is there a right way to get the same functionality without running a 2nd instance of make?

150

Actually you are right: it runs another instance of make. A possible solution would be:

.PHONY : clearscr fresh clean all

all :
    compile executable

clean :
    rm -f *.o $(EXEC)

fresh : clean clearscr all

clearscr:
    clear

By calling make fresh you get first the clean target, then the clearscreen which runs clear and finally all which does the job.

EDIT Aug 4

What happens in the case of parallel builds with make’s -j option? There's a way of fixing the order. From the make manual, section 4.2:

Occasionally, however, you have a situation where you want to impose a specific ordering on the rules to be invoked without forcing the target to be updated if one of those rules is executed. In that case, you want to define order-only prerequisites. Order-only prerequisites can be specified by placing a pipe symbol (|) in the prerequisites list: any prerequisites to the left of the pipe symbol are normal; any prerequisites to the right are order-only: targets : normal-prerequisites | order-only-prerequisites

The normal prerequisites section may of course be empty. Also, you may still declare multiple lines of prerequisites for the same target: they are appended appropriately. Note that if you declare the same file to be both a normal and an order-only prerequisite, the normal prerequisite takes precedence (since they are a strict superset of the behavior of an order-only prerequisite).

Hence the makefile becomes

.PHONY : clearscr fresh clean all

all :
    compile executable

clean :
    rm -f *.o $(EXEC)

fresh : | clean clearscr all

clearscr:
    clear

EDIT Dec 5

It is not a big deal to run more than one makefile instance since each command inside the task will be a sub-shell anyways. But you can have reusable methods using the call function.

log_success = (echo "\x1B[32m>> $1\x1B[39m")
log_error = (>&2 echo "\x1B[31m>> $1\x1B[39m" && exit 1)

install:
  @[ "$(AWS_PROFILE)" ] || $(call log_error, "AWS_PROFILE not set!")
  command1  # this line will be a subshell
  command2  # this line will be another subshell
  @command3  # Use `@` to hide the command line
  $(call log_error, "It works, yey!")

uninstall:
  @[ "$(AWS_PROFILE)" ] || $(call log_error, "AWS_PROFILE not set!")
  ....
  $(call log_error, "Nuked!")
  • 4
    @sas4740: basically everything follows .PHONY : is treated as some keyword that gets always executed, while non-phony targets are intended to be files. – Dacav Jul 16 '10 at 17:27
  • are "Order-only prerequisites" conditional? for target t2 I want first do t0, than only if t0 succeds run t1, and only if both succeds run some task in t3 – fantastory Mar 12 '15 at 7:32
  • 1
    @fantastory, no, I think they are independent. t2 will depend on t0, t1 and t3. If you need this you should put t3 as required by t2, t1 as required by t3 and t0 as required by t1. This means 3 different rules. You should verify this, however. I'm not 100% sure. – Dacav Mar 12 '15 at 10:34
  • 3
    "Order-only prerequisites" are independent – fantastory Mar 23 '15 at 13:57
  • 2
    I don't see where is the guarantee that 'clean' performs before 'all'? The fact that you put them right from | does not make them execute in-order. Order-only dependency means that target is not necessairly updated after such operation. It has nothing to do with ordering of the dependent elements... or? – CygnusX1 Nov 13 '16 at 17:06
6

If you removed the make all line from your "fresh" target:

fresh :
    rm -f *.o $(EXEC)
    clear

You could simply run the command make fresh all, which will execute as make fresh; make all.

Some might consider this as a second instance of make, but it's certainly not a sub-instance of make (a make inside of a make), which is what your attempt seemed to result in.

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