148

When I launch a new Terminal window, it starts me in 'Macintosh HD/Users/MyName'. How can I back out of my user directory, back up to the top level?

3
  • 18
    Use "cd /" to get to the root directory.
    – TMN
    Jul 16 '10 at 17:48
  • 1
    or just cd to get to the root directory Aug 9 '13 at 22:23
  • @coolcool1994 — That goes to the user's home directory, not the root directory.
    – Quentin
    May 8 '18 at 12:39
243

cd .. will back the directory up by one. If you want to reach a folder in the parent directory, you can do something like cd ../foldername. You can use the ".." trick as many times as you want to back up through multiple parent directories. For example, cd ../../Applications would take you to Macintosh HD/Applications

4
  • Big thanks! Macintosh HD/Applications is exactly where I was going.
    – JLeonard
    Jul 16 '10 at 18:30
  • cd / will get you to the root directory back
    – Zip
    Oct 26 '14 at 23:21
  • 5
    Make sure to put the space between "cd" and "..", small but may cause a pain if not paying attention. Aug 26 '15 at 10:53
  • @Nofel Make sure you put a space between cd and ..
    – davidcelis
    Feb 1 '16 at 1:25
23

For Mac Terminal

cd ..   # one up
cd ../  # two up
cd      # home directory 
cd /    # root directory
cd "yaya-13" # use quotes if the file name contains punctuation or spaces
2
  • cd goes to the user's home directory, not the root directory.
    – Quentin
    May 8 '18 at 12:39
  • 3
    Also cd ../ is not two up... The command is the same as cd ..
    – wkunker
    Dec 6 '18 at 21:04
16

Typing cd will take you back to your home directory. Whereas typing cd .. will move you up only one directory (the direct parent of the current directory).

5

To move up a directory, the quickest way would be to add an alias to ~/.bash_profile

alias ..='cd ..'

and then one would need only to type '..[return]'.

4

Let's make it even more simple. Type the below after the $ sign to go up one directory:

../
1
  • Doesn't work for me - I get the error -bash: ../: is a directory. I find it works with cd ../ though. Apr 16 '18 at 10:24

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