42

I am trying to import a CSV file data into AWS DynamoDB.

Here's what my CSV file looks like:

first_name  last_name
sri ram
Rahul   Dravid
JetPay  Underwriter
Anil Kumar  Gurram

16 Answers 16

16

In which language do you want to import the data? I just wrote a function in Node.js that can import a CSV file into a DynamoDB table. It first parses the whole CSV into an array, splits array into (25) chunks and then batchWriteItem into table.

Note: DynamoDB only allows writing up to 25 records at a time in batchinsert. So we have to split our array into chunks.

    var fs = require('fs');
    var parse = require('csv-parse');
    var async = require('async');

    var csv_filename = "YOUR_CSV_FILENAME_WITH_ABSOLUTE_PATH";

    rs = fs.createReadStream(csv_filename);
    parser = parse({
        columns : true,
        delimiter : ','
    }, function(err, data) {

        var split_arrays = [], size = 25;

        while (data.length > 0) {
            split_arrays.push(data.splice(0, size));
        }
        data_imported = false;
        chunk_no = 1;

        async.each(split_arrays, function(item_data, callback) {
            ddb.batchWriteItem({
                "TABLE_NAME" : item_data
            }, {}, function(err, res, cap) {
                console.log('done going next');
                if (err == null) {
                    console.log('Success chunk #' + chunk_no);
                    data_imported = true;
                } else {
                    console.log(err);
                    console.log('Fail chunk #' + chunk_no);
                    data_imported = false;
                }
                chunk_no++;
                callback();
            });

        }, function() {
            // run after loops
            console.log('all data imported....');

        });

    });
    rs.pipe(parser);
7
  • this is awesome but CSVs can differ in their formatting. a sample input file would be killer to go with the code. are strings quoted? single quoted? double quoted? no quotes? – anon58192932 Oct 9 '17 at 17:12
  • 1
    this script is giving me an error /home/username/workspace/users/node_script.js:22 ddb.batchWriteItem({ ^ ReferenceError: ddb is not defined – anon58192932 Oct 9 '17 at 19:26
  • You can pass parameters like 'quote', 'escape','separater' etc as optional. github.com/mafintosh/csv-parser – Hassan Siddique Oct 9 '17 at 22:04
  • ddb is dynamodb object. you can create it like this. var credentials = { accessKeyId : accessKeyId, secretAccessKey : secretAccessKey, endpoint : region }; var ddb = require('dynamodb').ddb(credentials); – Hassan Siddique Oct 9 '17 at 22:06
  • how would one instantiate ddb with the default local credentials which amazon stores in your ~/.aws folder after you use aws configure? – anon58192932 Oct 9 '17 at 22:40
10

As a lowly dev without perms to create a Data Pipeline, I had to use this javascript. Hassan Sidique's code was slightly out of date, but this worked for me:

var fs = require('fs');
var parse = require('csv-parse');
var async = require('async');
const AWS = require('aws-sdk');
const dynamodbDocClient = new AWS.DynamoDB({ region: "eu-west-1" });

var csv_filename = "./CSV.csv";

rs = fs.createReadStream(csv_filename);
parser = parse({
    columns : true,
    delimiter : ','
}, function(err, data) {
    var split_arrays = [], size = 25;

    while (data.length > 0) {

        //split_arrays.push(data.splice(0, size));
        let cur25 = data.splice(0, size)
        let item_data = []

        for (var i = cur25.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
          const this_item = {
            "PutRequest" : {
              "Item": {
                // your column names here will vary, but you'll need do define the type
                "Title": {
                  "S": cur25[i].Title
                },
                "Col2": {
                  "N": cur25[i].Col2
                },
                "Col3": {
                  "N": cur25[i].Col3
                }
              }
            }
          };
          item_data.push(this_item)
        }
        split_arrays.push(item_data);
    }
    data_imported = false;
    chunk_no = 1;
    async.each(split_arrays, (item_data, callback) => {
        const params = {
            RequestItems: {
                "tagPerformance" : item_data
            }
        }
        dynamodbDocClient.batchWriteItem(params, function(err, res, cap) {
            if (err === null) {
                console.log('Success chunk #' + chunk_no);
                data_imported = true;
            } else {
                console.log(err);
                console.log('Fail chunk #' + chunk_no);
                data_imported = false;
            }
            chunk_no++;
            callback();
        });

    }, () => {
        // run after loops
        console.log('all data imported....');

    });

});
rs.pipe(parser);

3
  • Which language/environment is that? Javascript, Node.JS? – NealWalters Oct 24 '17 at 20:48
  • 2
    can we get some comments? what's cur25? this code isn't looping directly line by line for me after a couple small modifications and I'm not sure what's going on here. – anon58192932 Nov 13 '17 at 23:15
  • this doesn't support arbitrarily long CSV files either. it's saying cannot read property length of undefined for a 5,000 line CSV file. – anon58192932 Nov 14 '17 at 1:49
8

You can use AWS Data Pipeline which is for things like this. You can upload your csv file to S3 and then use Data Pipeline to retrieve and populate a DynamoDB table. They have a step-by-step tutorial.

8
  • @TimLong I'm sorry to hear that. Have you seen this? aws.amazon.com/about-aws/global-infrastructure/… – bjfletcher Apr 5 '17 at 20:28
  • @TimLong ... and aws.amazon.com/about-aws/whats-new/2015/07/… – bjfletcher Apr 5 '17 at 20:29
  • 1
    aws data pipeline does not support csv format for importing data into dynamodb, instead it uses custom dynamodb backup format. – jzqa Aug 17 '17 at 7:06
  • 19
    What an awful answer ! To perform a mere import of CSV they recommend to pop up an EMR cluster, with all the cost that it involves .... – doanduyhai Jan 9 '18 at 19:02
  • 1
    we decided to use Dynamo in our latest project and every day we are regretting the decision. We might just switch to Postgres too. – AnBisw Jun 10 '18 at 9:11
8

Updated 2019 Javascript code

I didn't have much luck with any of the Javascript code samples above. Starting with Hassan Siddique answer above, I've updated to the latest API, included sample credential code, moved all user config to the top, added uuid()'s when missing and stripped out blank strings.

const fs = require('fs');
const parse = require('csv-parse');
const async = require('async');
const uuid = require('uuid/v4');
const AWS = require('aws-sdk');

// --- start user config ---

const AWS_CREDENTIALS_PROFILE = 'serverless-admin';
const CSV_FILENAME = "./majou.csv";
const DYNAMODB_REGION = 'eu-central-1';
const DYNAMODB_TABLENAME = 'entriesTable';

// --- end user config ---

const credentials = new AWS.SharedIniFileCredentials({
  profile: AWS_CREDENTIALS_PROFILE
});
AWS.config.credentials = credentials;
const docClient = new AWS.DynamoDB.DocumentClient({
  region: DYNAMODB_REGION
});

const rs = fs.createReadStream(CSV_FILENAME);
const parser = parse({
  columns: true,
  delimiter: ','
}, function(err, data) {

  var split_arrays = [],
    size = 25;

  while (data.length > 0) {
    split_arrays.push(data.splice(0, size));
  }
  data_imported = false;
  chunk_no = 1;

  async.each(split_arrays, function(item_data, callback) {
    const params = {
      RequestItems: {}
    };
    params.RequestItems[DYNAMODB_TABLENAME] = [];
    item_data.forEach(item => {
      for (key of Object.keys(item)) {
        // An AttributeValue may not contain an empty string
        if (item[key] === '')
          delete item[key];
      }

      params.RequestItems[DYNAMODB_TABLENAME].push({
        PutRequest: {
          Item: {
            id: uuid(),
            ...item
          }
        }
      });
    });

    docClient.batchWrite(params, function(err, res, cap) {
      console.log('done going next');
      if (err == null) {
        console.log('Success chunk #' + chunk_no);
        data_imported = true;
      } else {
        console.log(err);
        console.log('Fail chunk #' + chunk_no);
        data_imported = false;
      }
      chunk_no++;
      callback();
    });

  }, function() {
    // run after loops
    console.log('all data imported....');

  });

});
rs.pipe(parser);
5
  • this was wonderful. i had been struggling to get a simple CSV loaded into DynamoDB. looked through several posts and this was cleanest and easiest to successfully implement. – dmacke Aug 7 '19 at 23:10
  • Thank you. Was able to get this working with only changing the config token values and adding endpoint: "localhost:8000" to the DocumentClient parameter object. – user640118 Dec 31 '19 at 22:11
  • @gadicc what if I dont want to add uuid, instead whatever in the csv file I just only want to add that – PPARI1 Apr 16 '20 at 6:40
  • @PPARI1, I haven't touched this in ages but I think it should be enough to remove the id: uuid() line from the PutRequest in the middle. – gadicc Apr 17 '20 at 7:26
  • I'm getting a TypeError: Cannot read property 'length' of undefined in your while loop. Any idea why it's not using the read stream's file? – Norbert Sep 9 '20 at 8:59
6

Before getting to my code, some notes on testing this locally

I recommend using a local version of DynamoDB, in case you want to sanity check this before you start incurring charges and what not. I made some small modifications before posting this, so be sure to test with whatever means make sense to you. There is a fake batch upload job I commented out, which you could use in lieu of any DynamoDB service, remote or local, to verify in stdout that this is working to your needs.

dynamodb-local

See dynamodb-local on npmjs or manual install

If you went the manual install route, you can start dynamodb-local with something like this:

java -Djava.library.path=<PATH_TO_DYNAMODB_LOCAL>/DynamoDBLocal_lib/\
     -jar <PATH_TO_DYNAMODB_LOCAL>/DynamoDBLocal.jar\
     -inMemory\
     -sharedDb

The npm route may be simpler.

dynamodb-admin

Along with that, see dynamodb-admin.

I installed dynamodb-admin with npm i -g dynamodb-admin. It can then be run with:

dynamodb-admin

Using them:

dynamodb-local defaults to localhost:8000.

dynamodb-admin is a web page that defaults to localhost:8001. Once you launch these two services, open localhost:8001 in your browser to view and manipulate the database.

The script below doesn't create the database. Use dynamodb-admin for this.

Credit goes to...

The code

  • I'm not as experienced with JS & Node.js as I am with other languages, so please forgive any JS faux pas.
  • You'll notice each group of concurrent batches is purposely slowed down by 900ms. This was a hacky solution, and I'm leaving it here to serve as an example (and because of laziness, and because you're not paying me).
  • If you increase MAX_CONCURRENT_BATCHES, you will want to calculate the appropriate delay amount based on your WCU, item size, batch size, and the new concurrency level.
  • Another approach would be to turn on Auto Scaling and implement exponential backoff for each failed batch. Like I mention below in one of the comments, this really shouldn't be necessary with some back-of-the-envelope calculations to figure out how many writes you can actually do, given your WCU limit and data size, and just let your code run at a predictable rate the entire time.
  • You might wonder why I didn't just let AWS SDK handle concurrency. Good question. Probably would have made this slightly simpler. You could experiment by applying the MAX_CONCURRENT_BATCHES to the maxSockets config option, and modifying the code that creates arrays of batches so that it only passes individual batches forward.
/**
 * Uploads CSV data to DynamoDB.
 *
 * 1. Streams a CSV file line-by-line.
 * 2. Parses each line to a JSON object.
 * 3. Collects batches of JSON objects.
 * 4. Converts batches into the PutRequest format needed by AWS.DynamoDB.batchWriteItem
 *    and runs 1 or more batches at a time.
 */

const AWS = require("aws-sdk")
const chalk = require('chalk')
const fs = require('fs')
const split = require('split2')
const uuid = require('uuid')
const through2 = require('through2')
const { Writable } = require('stream');
const { Transform } = require('stream');

const CSV_FILE_PATH = __dirname + "/../assets/whatever.csv"

// A whitelist of the CSV columns to ingest.
const CSV_KEYS = [
    "id",
    "name", 
    "city"
]

// Inadequate WCU will cause "insufficient throughput" exceptions, which in this script are not currently  
// handled with retry attempts. Retries are not necessary as long as you consistently
// stay under the WCU, which isn't that hard to predict.

// The number of records to pass to AWS.DynamoDB.DocumentClient.batchWrite
// See https://docs.aws.amazon.com/amazondynamodb/latest/APIReference/API_BatchWriteItem.html
const MAX_RECORDS_PER_BATCH = 25

// The number of batches to upload concurrently.  
// https://docs.aws.amazon.com/sdk-for-javascript/v2/developer-guide/node-configuring-maxsockets.html
const MAX_CONCURRENT_BATCHES = 1

// MAKE SURE TO LAUNCH `dynamodb-local` EXTERNALLY FIRST IF USING LOCALHOST!
AWS.config.update({
    region: "us-west-1"
    ,endpoint: "http://localhost:8000"     // Comment out to hit live DynamoDB service.
});
const db = new AWS.DynamoDB()

// Create a file line reader.
var fileReaderStream = fs.createReadStream(CSV_FILE_PATH)
var lineReaderStream = fileReaderStream.pipe(split())

var linesRead = 0

// Attach a stream that transforms text lines into JSON objects.
var skipHeader = true
var csvParserStream = lineReaderStream.pipe(
    through2(
        {
            objectMode: true,
            highWaterMark: 1
        },
        function handleWrite(chunk, encoding, callback) {

            // ignore CSV header
            if (skipHeader) {
                skipHeader = false
                callback()
                return
            }

            linesRead++

            // transform line into stringified JSON
            const values = chunk.toString().split(',')
            const ret = {}
            CSV_KEYS.forEach((keyName, index) => {
                ret[keyName] = values[index]
            })
            ret.line = linesRead

            console.log(chalk.cyan.bold("csvParserStream:", 
                "line:", linesRead + ".", 
                chunk.length, "bytes.", 
                ret.id
            ))

            callback(null, ret)
        }
    )
)

// Attach a stream that collects incoming json lines to create batches. 
// Outputs an array (<= MAX_CONCURRENT_BATCHES) of arrays (<= MAX_RECORDS_PER_BATCH).
var batchingStream = (function batchObjectsIntoGroups(source) {
    var batchBuffer = []
    var idx = 0

    var batchingStream = source.pipe(
        through2.obj(
            {
                objectMode: true,
                writableObjectMode: true,
                highWaterMark: 1
            },
            function handleWrite(item, encoding, callback) {
                var batchIdx = Math.floor(idx / MAX_RECORDS_PER_BATCH)

                if (idx % MAX_RECORDS_PER_BATCH == 0 && batchIdx < MAX_CONCURRENT_BATCHES) {
                    batchBuffer.push([])
                }

                batchBuffer[batchIdx].push(item)

                if (MAX_CONCURRENT_BATCHES == batchBuffer.length &&
                    MAX_RECORDS_PER_BATCH == batchBuffer[MAX_CONCURRENT_BATCHES-1].length) 
                {
                    this.push(batchBuffer)
                    batchBuffer = []
                    idx = 0
                } else {
                    idx++
                }

                callback()
            },
            function handleFlush(callback) {
                if (batchBuffer.length) {
                    this.push(batchBuffer)
                }

                callback()
            }
        )
    )

    return (batchingStream);
})(csvParserStream)

// Attach a stream that transforms batch buffers to collections of DynamoDB batchWrite jobs.
var databaseStream = new Writable({

    objectMode: true,
    highWaterMark: 1,

    write(batchBuffer, encoding, callback) {
        console.log(chalk.yellow(`Batch being processed.`))

        // Create `batchBuffer.length` batchWrite jobs.
        var jobs = batchBuffer.map(batch => 
            buildBatchWriteJob(batch)
        )

        // Run multiple batch-write jobs concurrently.
        Promise
            .all(jobs)
            .then(results => {
                console.log(chalk.bold.red(`${batchBuffer.length} batches completed.`))
            })
            .catch(error => {
                console.log( chalk.red( "ERROR" ), error )
                callback(error)
            })
            .then( () => {
                console.log( chalk.bold.red("Resuming file input.") )

                setTimeout(callback, 900) // slow down the uploads. calculate this based on WCU, item size, batch size, and concurrency level.
            })

        // return false
    }
})
batchingStream.pipe(databaseStream)

// Builds a batch-write job that runs as an async promise.
function buildBatchWriteJob(batch) {
    let params = buildRequestParams(batch)

    // This was being used temporarily prior to hooking up the script to any dynamo service.

    // let fakeJob = new Promise( (resolve, reject) => {

    //     console.log(chalk.green.bold( "Would upload batch:", 
    //         pluckValues(batch, "line")
    //     ))

    //     let t0 = new Date().getTime()

    //     // fake timing
    //     setTimeout(function() {
    //         console.log(chalk.dim.yellow.italic(`Batch upload time: ${new Date().getTime() - t0}ms`))
    //         resolve()
    //     }, 300)
    // })
    // return fakeJob

    let promise = new Promise(
        function(resolve, reject) {
            let t0 = new Date().getTime()

            let printItems = function(msg, items) {
                console.log(chalk.green.bold(msg, pluckValues(batch, "id")))
            }

            let processItemsCallback = function (err, data) {
              if (err) { 
                 console.error(`Failed at batch: ${pluckValues(batch, "line")}, ${pluckValues(batch, "id")}`)
                 console.error("Error:", err)
                 reject()
              } else {
                var params = {}
                params.RequestItems = data.UnprocessedItems

                var numUnprocessed = Object.keys(params.RequestItems).length
                if (numUnprocessed != 0) {
                    console.log(`Encountered ${numUnprocessed}`)
                    printItems("Retrying unprocessed items:", params)
                    db.batchWriteItem(params, processItemsCallback)
                } else {
                    console.log(chalk.dim.yellow.italic(`Batch upload time: ${new Date().getTime() - t0}ms`))

                    resolve()
                }
              }
            }
            db.batchWriteItem(params, processItemsCallback)
        }
    )
    return (promise)
}

// Build request payload for the batchWrite
function buildRequestParams(batch) {

    var params = {
        RequestItems: {}
    }
    params.RequestItems.Provider = batch.map(obj => {

        let item = {}

        CSV_KEYS.forEach((keyName, index) => {
            if (obj[keyName] && obj[keyName].length > 0) {
                item[keyName] = { "S": obj[keyName] }
            }
        })

        return {
            PutRequest: {
                Item: item
            }
        }
    })
    return params
}

function pluckValues(batch, fieldName) {
    var values = batch.map(item => {
        return (item[fieldName])
    })
    return (values)
}
6

I've created a gem for this.

Now you can install it by running gem install dynamocli, then you can use the command:

dynamocli import your_data.csv --to your_table

Here is the link to the source code: https://github.com/matheussilvasantos/dynamocli

2
  • 2
    Used this today to migrate contents of one dynamodb table to another, works a treat! – smilin_stan Jul 31 '20 at 11:54
  • 2
    This is, by a wide margin, the best solution to this question. Thank you! – jwanga Sep 4 '20 at 20:55
6

I wrote a tool to do this using parallel execution that requires no dependencies or developer tooling installed on the machine (it's written in Go).

It can handle:

  • Comma separated (CSV) files
  • Tab separated (TSV) files
  • Large files
  • Local files
  • Files on S3
  • Parallel imports within AWS using AWS Step Functions to import > 4M rows per minute
  • No dependencies (no need for .NET, Python, Node.js, Docker, AWS CLI etc.)

It's available for MacOS, Linux, Windows and Docker: https://github.com/a-h/ddbimport

example screenshot

Here's the results of my tests showing that it can import a lot faster in parallel using AWS Step Functions.

enter image description here

I'm describing the tool in more detail at AWS Community Summit on the 15th May 2020 at 1155 BST - https://www.twitch.tv/awscomsum

2
  • Do you have a link to the recording? I browsed through this channel twitch.tv/awscomsum and could not find your talk. Cheers! – youjin May 27 '20 at 6:17
  • For this to work fast, it is imperative for the Read/write capacity mode to be set "On-demand" – Wilhelm Sorban Aug 15 '20 at 16:37
4

Here's my solution. I relied on the fact that there was some type of header indicating what column did what. Simple and straight forward. No pipeline nonsense for a quick upload..

import os, json, csv, yaml, time
from tqdm import tqdm

# For Database
import boto3

# Variable store
environment = {}

# Environment variables
with open("../env.yml", 'r') as stream:
    try:
        environment = yaml.load(stream)
    except yaml.YAMLError as exc:
        print(exc)

# Get the service resource.
dynamodb = boto3.resource('dynamodb',
    aws_access_key_id=environment['AWS_ACCESS_KEY'],
    aws_secret_access_key=environment['AWS_SECRET_KEY'],
    region_name=environment['AWS_REGION_NAME'])

# Instantiate a table resource object without actually
# creating a DynamoDB table. Note that the attributes of this table
# are lazy-loaded: a request is not made nor are the attribute
# values populated until the attributes
# on the table resource are accessed or its load() method is called.
table = dynamodb.Table('data')

# Header
header = []

# Open CSV
with open('export.csv') as csvfile:
    reader = csv.reader(csvfile,delimiter=',')

    # Parse Each Line
    with table.batch_writer() as batch:
        for index,row in enumerate(tqdm(reader)):

            if index == 0:
                #save the header to be used as the keys
                header = row
            else:

                if row == "": 
                    continue

                # Create JSON Object
                # Push to DynamoDB

                data = {}

                # Iterate over each column
                for index,entry in enumerate(header):
                    data[entry.lower()] = row[index]

                response = batch.put_item(
                   Item=data
                )

                # Repeat
3

Another quick workaround is to load your CSV to RDS or any other mysql instance first, which is quite easy to do (https://docs.aws.amazon.com/amazondynamodb/latest/developerguide/Introduction.html) and then use DMS (AWS Database Migration Service) to load the entire data to dynamodb. You'll have to create a role for DMS before you can load the data. But this works wonderfully without having to run any scripts.

1

Here's a simpler solution. And with this solution, you don't have to remove empty string attributes.

require('./env'); //contains aws secret/access key
const parse = require('csvtojson');
const AWS = require('aws-sdk');

// --- start user config ---

const CSV_FILENAME = __dirname + "/002_subscribers_copy_from_db.csv";
const DYNAMODB_TABLENAME = '002-Subscribers';

// --- end user config ---

//You could add your credentials here or you could
//store it in process.env like I have done aws-sdk
//would detect the keys in the environment

AWS.config.update({
    region: process.env.AWS_REGION
});

const db = new AWS.DynamoDB.DocumentClient({
    convertEmptyValues: true
});

(async ()=>{
    const json = await parse().fromFile(CSV_FILENAME);

    //this is efficient enough if you're processing small
    //amounts of data. If your data set is large then I
    //suggest using dynamodb method .batchWrite() and send 
    //in data in chunks of 25 (the limit) and find yourself
    //a more efficient loop if there is one
    for(var i=0; i<json.length; i++){
        console.log(`processing item number ${i+1}`);
        let query = {
            TableName: DYNAMODB_TABLENAME,
            Item: json[i]
        };

        await db.put(query).promise();

        /**
         * Note: If "json" contains other nested objects, you would have to
         *       loop through the json and parse all child objects.
         *       likewise, you would have to convert all children into their
         *       native primitive types because everything would be represented
         *       as a string.
         */
    }
    console.log('\nDone.');
})();
1

One way of importing/exporting stuff:

"""
Batch-writes data from a file to a dynamo-db database.
"""

import json
import boto3

# Get items from DynamoDB table like this:
# aws dynamodb scan --table-name <table-name>

# Create dynamodb client.
client = boto3.client(
    'dynamodb',
    aws_access_key_id='',
    aws_secret_access_key=''
)

with open('', 'r') as file:
    data = json.loads(file.read())['Items']

    # Execute write-data request for each item.
    for item in data:
        client.put_item(
            TableName='',
            Item=item
        )
0

You can try using batch writes and multiprocessing to speed up your bulk import.

import csv
import time
import boto3
from multiprocessing.dummy import Pool as ThreadPool
pool = ThreadPool(4)

current_milli_time = lambda: int(round(time.time() * 1000))
dynamodb = boto3.resource('dynamodb')
table = dynamodb.Table('table_name')

def add_users_in_batch(data):
    with table.batch_writer() as batch:
        for item in data:
            batch.put_item(Item = item)


def run_batch_migration():
    start = current_milli_time()
    row_count = 0
    batch = []
    batches = []
    with open(CSV_PATH, newline = '') as csvfile:
        reader = csv.reader(csvfile, delimiter = '\t', quotechar = '|')
        for row in reader:
            row_count += 1
            item = {
                'email': row[0],
                'country': row[1]
            }
            batch.append(item)
            if row_count % 25 == 0:
                batches.append(batch)
                batch = []
        batches.append(batch)
        pool.map(add_users_in_batch, batches)

    print('Number of rows processed - ', str(row_count))
    end = current_milli_time()
    print('Total time taken for migration : ', str((end - start) / 1000), ' secs')


if __name__ == "__main__":
    run_batch_migration()
1
  • Can you please confirm that you measured an actual 4x speedup with your parallel load ? That 25 row batching is unnecessary when batch_writer() can do it internally. – Amit Naidu Jun 18 '19 at 22:36
0

The simplest solution is probably to use a template / solution made by AWS:

Implementing bulk CSV ingestion to Amazon DynamoDB https://aws.amazon.com/blogs/database/implementing-bulk-csv-ingestion-to-amazon-dynamodb/

With this approach, you use the template provided to create a CloudFormation stack including an S3 bucket, a Lambda function, and a new DynamoDB table. The lambda is triggered to run on upload to the S3 bucket and inserts into the table in batches.

In my case, I wanted to insert into an existing table, so I just changed the Lambda function's environment variable once the stack was created.

3
  • I have tested this solution. In this solution it will create a new table. It does not try to import data to an existing table! – MJBZA Jan 4 at 11:13
  • @MahdiJ.Ansari - yes you're right. as i mentioned, you can just change the name of the table in the lambda function's environment variable. – rajd Jan 5 at 19:09
  • You can also remove the part that creates the new table altogether ("DynamoDBTable" under "Resources") if you always need to push data into an existing table. – Greg Forel Jan 6 at 18:09
0

Follow the instruction in the following link to import data to existing tables in DynamoDB:

https://docs.aws.amazon.com/amazondynamodb/latest/developerguide/SampleData.LoadData.html

Please note, the name of the tables is what you must find here: https://console.aws.amazon.com/dynamodbv2/home

And the name of the table is used inside the json file, the name of the json file itself is not important. For example I have a table as Country-kdezpod7qrap7nhpjghjj-staging, then for importing data to that table I must make a json file like this:

{
    "Country-kdezpod7qrap7nhpjghjj-staging": [
        {
            "PutRequest": {
                "Item": {
                      "id": {
                        "S": "ir"
                      },
                      "__typename": {
                        "S": "Country"
                      },
                      "createdAt": {
                        "S": "2021-01-04T12:32:09.012Z"
                      },
                      "name": {
                        "S": "Iran"
                      },
                      "self": {
                        "N": "1"
                      },
                      "updatedAt": {
                        "S": "2021-01-04T12:32:09.012Z"
                      }
                }
            }
        }        
    ]
}

If you don't know how to create the items for each PutRequest then you can create an item in your DB with mutation and then try to duplicate it, then it will show the structure of one item for you:

enter image description here

If you have a huge list of items in your CSV file, you can use the following npm tool to generate the json file:

https://www.npmjs.com/package/json-dynamo-putrequest

Then we can use the following command to import the data:

aws dynamodb batch-write-item --request-items file://Country.json

If it import the data successfully, you must see the following output:

{
    "UnprocessedItems": {}
}

Also please note that with this method you can only have 25 PutRequest items in your array. So if you want to push 100 items you need to create 4 files.

0

Try this. This is much simple and helpful.

0

I used https://github.com/GorillaStack/dynamodb-csv-export-import. It is super simple and worked like a charm. I just followed the instructions in the README:

# Install globally
npm i -g @gorillastack/dynamodb-csv-export-import
# Set AWS region
export AWS_DEFAULT_REGION=us-east-1
# Use it for your CSV and dynamo table
dynamodb-csv-export-import my-exported-file.csv MyDynamoDbTableName

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