56

What's the proper way to use for-in loop with an optional?

Right now I always perform an optional binding before looping it. Are there other idioms?

let optionalInt:[Int]? = [1, 2, 3]

if let optionalInt = optionalInt {
  for i in optionalInt {
    print(i)
  }
}

5 Answers 5

54

If set of operations to be applied to all elements of the array, it is possible to replace for-loop with forEach{} closure and use optional chaining:

var arr: [Int]? = [1, 2, 3]
arr?.forEach{print($0)}
5
  • 3
    No, it's not the only answer. However, it's the shortest one. Dec 4, 2016 at 18:34
  • 2
    Note that you cannot break on a forEach.
    – vomi
    Nov 6, 2019 at 21:26
  • 1
    Note you cannot do a forEach if the loop is part of an object's initialization logic, since self can't be captured by a closure before self is initialized.
    – psilencer
    Apr 23, 2021 at 22:02
  • This also adds unnecessary memory and performance footprint May 20, 2021 at 14:59
  • Memory and performance footprint are the same if not similar. If you'd like to reduce memory footprint, consider using autoreleasepool in for loops: developer.apple.com/library/archive/documentation/Cocoa/… May 20, 2021 at 20:26
24

I don't think there's a proper way. There are many different ways, it really comes down to what you prefer, Swift is full of features that can make your program look really nice as per your choosing.

Here are some ways I could think of:

let optionalInt:[Int]? = [1, 2, 3]

for i in optionalInt! { print(i) }

for i in optionalInt ?? [] { print(i) }

for i in optionalInt as [Int]! {  print(i) }
0
10

You can write this one:

let optionalInt:[Int]? = [1, 2, 3]
for i in optionalInt ?? [Int]() {
    print(i)
}

But I'd recommend you avoid using optional value, for instance you can write like this:

var values = [Int]()
// now you may set or may not set 
for i in values {
    print(i)
}

Or if you want to use optional value and this code calls in a function can use guard:

guard let values = optionalInt else { return }
for i in values {
    print(i)
}
1
  • for i in optionalInt ?? [Int]() is extra for i in optionalInt ?? [] is enough
    – Gargo
    May 29, 2023 at 7:22
5

the cleanest solution is sometimes the most basic one

if let a = myOptionalArray {
    for i in a {
        
    }
}

so i would suggest, keep your approach

the approaches above only insert an empty option, or the forEach creates a block just because if let a = optional { isn't sexi enough

0

I'm two years late but I think this is the best way.

func maybe<T>(risk: T?, backup: T) -> T {
  return risk.maybe(backup)
}

and

extension Optional {
   func maybe(_ backup: Wrapped) -> Wrapped {
     switch self {
     case let .some(val):
        return val
     case .none:
        return backup
     }
   }
}

and now

for i in optionalInt.maybe([]) {
    print(i)
}
4
  • 2
    LOL? `for i in optionalInt ?? [] { print(i) }' Apr 6, 2018 at 10:37
  • 4
    ha! killing a mosquito with a canon Oct 31, 2018 at 8:18
  • wau, I just think sometimes, and what was wrong with objective-c nil behaviour ? We are back into how to loop simple array and don't write boilerplate... Ah I forgot , swift designers just need to be different haha
    – Renetik
    Feb 20, 2019 at 18:52
  • 1
    How many people scratch their heads before realizing it's a joke?
    – Hampden123
    Feb 27, 2020 at 12:33

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