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I am writting a multi-tenants web service using ASP.NET 5 and EF7. The Repository Data is specific to a tenant/user. Because I'll be using the TenantId in all the calls, I would like to initialize the Repository with the current TenantId.

public class MyRepository {
    private int tenantId;
    public MyRepository(MyDbContext context, int tenantId) { 
        this.tenantId = tenantId;
        // ...
    }

    public Task<List<Data>> GetAllAsync() {
        return this.context.Data.Where(d => d.TenantId == this.tenantId).ToListAsync();
    }
}

public class Startup {
    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) {
        // How do I pass the TenantId to the constructor?
        services.AddScoped<MyRepository>();
    }
}

Is it possible to initialize my Repository once after a user has been authenticated? How would I pass the TenantId with the constructor?

  • You could inject an interface that only contains the tenant id and use the AddInstance method, something like this: services.AddInstance<ITenant>(GetTenantMethod()); or even services.AddScoped<ITenant>(x => GetTenantMethod()); – DavidG Sep 21 '15 at 0:27
11
0

Both your tenant and user id values are runtime data and you should not inject runtime data into the components of your system (your repository in this case), because that complicates your Composition Root tremendously (as you are already experiencing) and makes it almost impossible to verify your object graph. Runtime data should flow through an already constructed object graph. There are basically two ways of achieving this. Either you pass through the data through the method calls of your component's public API, or you inject a component that is responsible for retrieving the runtime value when it is requested.

In your case, the latter option is best. My advice is therefore to inject a component that allows retrieving this contextual information:

public interface ITenantContext
{
    int CurrentTenantId { get; }
}

public interface IUserContext
{
    int CurrentUserId { get; }
}

public class MyRepository {
    private readonly Func<MyDbContext> contextProvider;
    private readonly ITenantContext tentantContext;

    public MyRepository(Func<MyDbContext> contextProvider, ITenantContext tentantContext){ 
        this.contextProvider = contextProvider;
        this.tentantContex = tentantContex;
    }

    public Task<List<Data>> GetAllAsync() {
        return this.contextProvider().Data
            .Where(d => d.TenantId == this.tenantContext.CurrentTenantId)
            .ToListAsync();
}

This solves the problem elegantly, because now you can define a ITenantContext implementation that knows how to retrieve the right tenant ID for the current request. For instance:

public sealed class AspNetSessionTenantContext : ITenantContext {
    public int CurrentTenantId {
        get { return (int)HttpContext.Current.Session["tenantId"]; }
    }
}

This even allows you to register all your components as singleton, which can improve performance, and reduce the change of common DI pitfalls, such as Captive Dependencies.

| improve this answer | |
  • This is a great answer, but what is the IUserContext in your example? – janhartmann Sep 21 '15 at 11:55
  • @janhartmann: What about it? The question title talks about both a tenant id and user id, so I show abstractions for both of them. – Steven Sep 21 '15 at 12:01
  • Ah okay, sorry. I just could not see IUserContext used in the repository example. – janhartmann Sep 21 '15 at 12:02
  • 1
    @janhartmann: That's correct, because the user ID isn't in the OP's MyRepository example. – Steven Sep 21 '15 at 12:06
  • tx, this solved my problem! I used a different approach but using your idea on injecting a component to retrieve the Tenant ID. – Fabio Belz Dec 22 '19 at 19:57
2
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The problem is that userId is a current context property. For example, you can use User.GetUserId() to get the userId for a controller action context. If you want to pass userId by a DI container, you should be able to get userId at the entry point. If you can do it, you can register the dependency like this

public class Startup {
    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) {
        services.AddScoped<MyRepository>(() => new MyRepository(GetContext(), GetCurrentUserId()));
    }
}

But I think that this is not the easiest way to implement the method GetCurrentUserId().

There is a better way to pass userId in the method rather than the constructor. Then you can use the same instance of the repository for different users.

public class IMyRepository  
{
    public Task<List<Data>> GetAllAsync(int userId);
}

public class MyRepository : IMyRepository  
{
    private MyDbContext context;

    public MyRepository(MyDbContext context) { 
        this.context = context;
    }

    public Task<List<Data>> GetAllAsync(int userId) {
        return this.context.Data.Where(d => d.UserId== this.userId).ToListAsync();
    }
}

public class Startup {
    public void ConfigureServices(IServiceCollection services) {
        services.AddScoped<IMyRepository, MyRepository>();
    }
}

You can use it from a controller, for example

public class SomeController : Controller
{
    private readonly IMyRepository repository;

    public SomeController(
        IMyRepository repository)
    {
        this.repository = repository;
    }

    public async Task<IActionResult> SomeAction()
    {
        if (User.Identity.IsAuthenticated)
            {
                var data = await repository.GetAllAsync(User.GetUserId());
                // do something else
            }
    }
}

I hope it will be useful.

| improve this answer | |
2
0

The configuration in the composition root is run one time at application startup (and once for every application pool restart). The classes registered become part of the application's object graph and do not change at runtime.

Clearly, tenantId is part of your application's runtime state, so you need to inject it at runtime, after the user's request has been started. So, the easiest solution is to pass it as a method parameter when requesting the data.

public class MyRepository {
    public MyRepository(MyDbContext context) { 
        this.context = context;
        // ...
    }

    public Task<List<Data>> GetAllAsync(int tenantId) {
        return this.context.Data.Where(d => d.TenantId == tenantId).ToListAsync();
    }
}

You could make possible to only have to pass it in one place by using an Abstract Factory. However, you must decide if the extra complexity of doing so is really worth the effort of avoiding the tenantId parameter on every method call.

public class MyRepositoryFactory : IMyRepositoryFactory
{
    private readonly MyDbContext context;
    public MyRepositoryFactory(MyDbContext context)
    {
        this.context = context;
    }

    public IMyRepository Create(int tenantId)
    {
        return new MyRepository(this.context, tenantId);
    }
}

And in your controller:

public class MyController : Controller
{
    private readonly IMyRepository myRepository

    public MyController(IMyRepositoryFactory myRepositoryFactory)
    {
        // Centralize tenantId logic
        int tenantId = GetTenantId();
        this.myRepository = myRepositoryFactory.Create(tenantId);
    }

    public IActionResult Index()
    {
        // Use the repository
        // var x = await this.myRepository.GetAllAsync();

        return View();
    }
}

Note that because a controller is also part of the application's runtime state, you can get away with looking up the tenantId inside of its constructor or (better yet) by injecting it into the controller via a custom IControllerFactory.

In your Startup.cs, you just need to register the repository factory, as follows:

services.AddTransient<IMyRepositoryFactory, MyRepositoryFactory>();
| improve this answer | |
  • Thank you @NightOwl888 for responding. However my question is in the context of ASP.NET 5 MVC 6 with the built in Dependency Injection (as specified by the question tags). – Martin Sep 21 '15 at 16:44
  • @Martin - And my answer is for ASP.NET 5 MVC 6. What part of it are you getting tripped up on? – NightOwl888 Sep 21 '15 at 16:58
  • I must be missing something then. Where do you register IMyRepositoryFactory? I would expect to see a Startup class. – Martin Sep 21 '15 at 17:21
  • @Martin - I updated my answer with the line to add to Startup.cs. Sorry, I thought that part would be obvious. – NightOwl888 Sep 21 '15 at 18:04
0
0

You can manually invoke a constructor like this:

services.AddScoped<MyRepository>(s => new MyRepository(context, tenantId));
| improve this answer | |
  • I understand that, but first the tenantId changes and second I need to integrate that with authentication. – Martin Sep 21 '15 at 5:21
  • Maybe you need to think about redesigning it? Although it is a dependency, I'm not sure it'll go well with dependency injection. What about using a property instead? When does it change and where does the tenantId come from? Can you update your question? – Dealdiane Sep 21 '15 at 8:06

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