25

Value of constant variable can be changed through pointer tricks, but is it possible to do something like this :

    class A (){
       int x;
    public:
       void func () const {
          //change value of x here
    }
}
5
  • 1
    Value of constant variable can be changed through pointer tricks - Sure, but it's not useful at all. Just because you can trick the compiler into that doesn't mean it's safe.
    – chris
    Sep 21, 2015 at 1:49
  • i understand, just asked out of curiosity and knowledge of tricks
    – user5357261
    Sep 21, 2015 at 1:51
  • 1
    Yes and safe if you mark x as mutable int x;
    – vsoftco
    Sep 21, 2015 at 1:53
  • 3
    @jacky666 You see, the use of const is generally optional, its mostly something you use to tell the compiler a determined method is "read-only" and guaranteed to execute without changing any data in the class. When you violate that premise you defeat the purpose of defining a method as const to begin with. Don't do it. If your method does in fact change data in the class, then don't make it const.
    – Havenard
    Sep 21, 2015 at 1:54
  • 1
    The search is your friend stackoverflow.com/questions/751681/…
    – Sergio
    Sep 21, 2015 at 2:08

7 Answers 7

73

declare x mutable

class A (){
   mutable int x;
public:
   void func () const {
      //change value of x here
   }
}; 
1
  • This saved me a ton of time! Thank you for this! Sep 19, 2021 at 4:09
15

You have two options:

class C
{
public:
    void const_f() const
    {
        x = 5;                               // A
        auto* p_this = const_cast<C*>(this); // B
        p_this->y = 5;
    }

private:
    mutable int x;                           // A
    int y;
};
  • A: declare certain members mutable.
  • B: const_cast to remove constness from the this pointer.
2
  • Isn't p_this->y = 5; undefined behavior?
    – Emil Laine
    Dec 29, 2015 at 13:15
  • Your Plan B is UB if this really points to an immutable object.
    – Swordfish
    Aug 20, 2020 at 17:04
8

Though this is not appreciated, but C++ provides “Backdoors” which can be used to breach its own regulations, just like dirty pointer tricks. Anyway, you can easily do this by using a casted version of “This” pointer :

class A (){
           int x;
        public:
           void func () const {
              //change value of x here
         A* ptr =  const_cast<A*> (this);
         ptr->x= 10;     //Voila ! Here you go buddy 
        }
 }
2
  • 2
    I believe you meant const_cast, and this is an incomplete answer.
    – Havenard
    Sep 21, 2015 at 1:51
  • 1
    and even if you const_cast ... doing it to an immutable object and modifying it is UB.
    – Swordfish
    Aug 20, 2020 at 17:02
8

The most important thing to understand here is bitwise/physical/concrete constness and conceptual/meaningwise/logical/abstract constness.

In short:

  • If the function is conceptually const, make the member data mutable.
  • Otherwise, make the function non-const.
0
0

Just cast 'this', this would be a dirty way to implement your program, do avoid this if you are doing a project or teamwork as others would get confused by this.

    class CAST_CLASS (){
       int var;
    public:
       void change_CAST () const {

     CAST_CLASS* pointer =  const_cast<CAST_CLASS*> (this);
     pointer->var= 10;     
    }};
0

The other answers don't mention this, but following also modifies "x" (definitely, not advisable):

class A {
    int x, &y{x}, *z{&x};
public:
    void func () const
    {
        y  = 42; // x is modified now!
        *z = 29; // x is modified again!!
    }
};
0

The only possibly valid use I have seen of using "mutable" to subvert a "const" method is when implementing a cache of a read-only value.

class Picture {
public:
    Picture(string sourcePath)
    : m_sourcePath(sourcePath)
    , m_image(nullptr)
    {};
    Image GetImage() const {
        if(m_image == nullptr)
            m_image = ReadImageOffWeb(m_sourcePath);
        return *m_image;
    }
private:
   string m_sourcePath;
   mutable Image* m_image;
}

Of course if you fetch the picture at construction time you wouldn't need to do all this, but that could be slow if you have a lot of pictures. Now you can load the pictures lazily even if the objects are declared or passed const.

There is good value is respecting the "const" contract, so the burden is now on the class designer to make sure the object still behaves "const".

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service and acknowledge you have read our privacy policy.