116

I am trying to write setup.py for my package. My package needs to specify a dependency on another Git repository.

This is what I have so far:

from setuptools import setup, find_packages

setup(
    name='abc',
    packages=find_packages(),
    url='https://github.abc.com/abc/myabc',
    description='This is a description for abc',
    long_description=open('README.md').read(),
    install_requires=[
        "requests==2.7.0",
        "SomePrivateLib>=0.1.0",
        ],
    dependency_links = [
     "git+git://github.abc.com/abc/SomePrivateLib.git#egg=SomePrivateLib",
    ],
    include_package_data=True,
)

When I run:

pip install -e https://github.abc.com/abc/myabc.git#egg=analyse

I get

Could not find a version that satisfies the requirement SomePrivateLib>=0.1.0 (from analyse) (from versions: ) No matching distribution found for SomePrivateLib>=0.1.0 (from analyse)

What am I doing wrong?

1
  • Note that setup.py and pip are completely different systems. One issue that I had was that I was able to get this working for pip but not for setup.py. – bcattle Sep 19 '20 at 15:46
50

Note: this answer is now outdated. Have a look at this answer below from @Dick Fox for up-to-date instructions: https://stackoverflow.com/a/54794506/2272172


You can find the right way to do it here.

dependency_links=['http://github.com/user/repo/tarball/master#egg=package-1.0']

The key is not to give a link to a Git repository, but a link to a tarball. GitHub creates a tarball of the master branch for you if you append /tarball/master as shown above.

10
  • 19
    looks like this method is deprecated per github.com/pypa/pip/issues/3939 – muon May 14 '18 at 1:17
  • 5
    This method is also useless for private repositories, since there's no way to authenticate. – Robert Hafner Feb 13 '19 at 20:55
  • 3
    I did manage to get it working and have added another answer. – Robert Hafner Feb 15 '19 at 1:19
  • 1
    The /tarball/master method does not work for gitlab – Martin Thoma Feb 13 '20 at 9:17
  • 6
    Deprecated. Correct answer is to use Pep508, answered by @Dick Fox below – SwimBikeRun Jul 30 '20 at 19:01
141

After digging through the pip issue 3939 linked by @muon in the comments above and then the PEP-508 specification, I found success getting my private repo dependency to install via setup.py using this specification pattern in install_requires (no more dependency_links):

install_requires = [
  'some-pkg @ git+ssh://git@github.com/someorgname/pkg-repo-name@v1.1#egg=some-pkg',
]

The @v1.1 indicates the release tag created on github and could be replaced with a branch, commit, or different type of tag.

11
  • 7
    @Brian Could you please provide a link to official statement? – Elephant Aug 28 '19 at 13:59
  • 19
    Note you can do git+https://github.com if you don't want to use SSH. – multithr3at3d Nov 16 '19 at 21:57
  • 3
    So what is the correct approach for doing a --upgrade? Even though I specify a tag version an upgrade just ignores newer tag versions – Piacenti Feb 27 '20 at 19:11
  • 1
    @Elephant Not super official, but these are at least comments on the pip GitHub project from actual members of the PyPA: github.com/pypa/pip/issues/4187#issuecomment-415667805 and further explanation: github.com/pypa/pip/issues/4187#issuecomment-415067034 – Dominick Pastore May 4 '20 at 16:13
  • 2
    Is there a protocol that works both for pip requirements files and install_requires? I usually use the pattern install_requires=open("requirements.txt", "r").read().splitlines() – Eduardo Pignatelli Dec 21 '20 at 19:16
36

This answer has been updated regularly as Python has evolved over the years. Scroll to the bottom for the most current answer, or read through to see how this has evolved.

Unfortunately the other answer does not work with private repositories, which is one of the most common use cases for this. I eventually did get it working with a setup.py file that looks like this (now deprecated) method:

from setuptools import setup, find_packages

setup(
    name = 'MyProject',
    version = '0.1.0',
    url = '',
    description = '',
    packages = find_packages(),
    install_requires = [
        # Github Private Repository - needs entry in `dependency_links`
        'ExampleRepo'
    ],

    dependency_links=[
        # Make sure to include the `#egg` portion so the `install_requires` recognizes the package
        'git+ssh://git@github.com/example_organization/ExampleRepo.git#egg=ExampleRepo-0.1'
    ]
)

Newer versions of pip make this even easier by removing the need to use "dependency_links"-

from setuptools import setup, find_packages

setup(
    name = 'MyProject',
    version = '0.1.0',
    url = '',
    description = '',
    packages = find_packages(),
    install_requires = [
        # Github Private Repository
        'ExampleRepo @ git+ssh://git@github.com/example_organization/ExampleRepo.git#egg=ExampleRepo-0.1'
    ]
)

However, with the very latest pip you'll run into issues with the EGG format handler. This is because while the egg is ignored pip is now doing direct URL matching and will consider two URLs, one with the egg fragment and the other without, to be completely different versions even if they point to the same package. As such it's best to leave any egg fragments off.

So, the best way (current to June 2021) to add a dependency to Github that will work with public and private repositories:

from setuptools import setup, find_packages

setup(
    name = 'MyProject',
    version = '0.1.0',
    url = '',
    description = '',
    packages = find_packages(),
    install_requires = [
        # Github Private Repository
        'ExampleRepo @ git+ssh://git@github.com/example_organization/ExampleRepo.git'
    ]
)
5
  • 2
    could you please elaborate what -0.1 stands for in your approach? Do you take the version number from a git release or from the setup.py description? – Peteris Oct 24 '19 at 17:35
  • 2
    From the setup.py file- if you want to use a specific branch or tag you format things a little differently. – Robert Hafner Oct 27 '19 at 23:46
  • "Unfortunately the other answer does not work with private repositories" This is no longer true Fox's answer does work on private repo without needing dependency_links (which is deprecated) – Keto Sep 24 '20 at 23:55
  • Thanks @Keto! I don't know why your edit got rejected but the mods, but I went ahead and overrode that rejection to add the deprecation notice to the answer. – Robert Hafner Sep 30 '20 at 18:32
  • 2
    This really ought to be the top answer, it's actually relevant in the current time. – SilentW Feb 25 at 0:02
5

A more general answer: To get the information from the requirements.txt file I do:

from setuptools import setup, find_packages
from os import path

loc = path.abspath(path.dirname(__file__))

with open(loc + '/requirements.txt') as f:
    requirements = f.read().splitlines()

required = []
dependency_links = []

# Do not add to required lines pointing to Git repositories
EGG_MARK = '#egg='
for line in requirements:
    if line.startswith('-e git:') or line.startswith('-e git+') or \
            line.startswith('git:') or line.startswith('git+'):
        if EGG_MARK in line:
            package_name = line[line.find(EGG_MARK) + len(EGG_MARK):]
            required.append(package_name)
            dependency_links.append(line)
        else:
            print('Dependency to a git repository should have the format:')
            print('git+ssh://git@github.com/xxxxx/xxxxxx#egg=package_name')
    else:
        required.append(line)

setup(
    name='myproject',  # Required
    version='0.0.1',  # Required
    description='Description here....',  # Required
    packages=find_packages(),  # Required
    install_requires=required,
    dependency_links=dependency_links,
)
0
3

Actually if you like to make your packages installable recursively (YourCurrentPackage includes your SomePrivateLib), e.g. when you want to include YourCurrentPackage into another one (like OuterPackage → YourCurrentPackage → SomePrivateLib) you'll need both:

install_requires=[
    ...,
    "SomePrivateLib @ git+ssh://github.abc.com/abc/SomePrivateLib.git@0.1.0#egg=SomePrivateLib"
],
dependency_links = [
    "git+ssh://github.abc.com/abc/SomePrivateLib.git@0.1.0#egg=SomePrivateLib"
]

And make sure you have a tag created with your version number.

Also if your Git project is private and you like to install it inside the container, e.g., a Docker or GitLab runner, you will need authorized access to your repository. Please consider to use Git + HTTPS with access tokens (like on GitLab: https://docs.gitlab.com/ee/user/profile/personal_access_tokens.html):

import os
from setuptools import setup

TOKEN_VALUE = os.getenv('EXPORTED_VAR_WITH_TOKEN')

setup(
    ....

    install_requires=[
            ...,
            f"SomePrivateLib @ git+https://gitlab-ci-token:{TOKEN_VALUE}@gitlab.server.com/abc/SomePrivateLib.git@0.1.0#egg=SomePrivateLib"
    ],
    dependency_links = [
            f"git+https://gitlab-ci-token:{TOKEN_VALUE}@gitlab.server.com/abc/SomePrivateLib.git@0.1.0#egg=SomePrivateLib"
    ]
)

Updated:

You have to put #egg=SomePrivateLib at the end of dependency line if you like to have this dependency in requirements.txt file. Otherwise pip install -r requirements.txt won't work for you and you wil get something like:

ERROR: Could not detect requirement name for 'git+https://gitlab-ci-token:gitlabtokenvalue@gitlab.server.com/abc/SomePrivateLib.git@0.1.0', please specify one with #egg=your_package_name

If you use reuirements.txt, this part is resposible for name of dependency’s folder that would be created inside python_home_dir/src and for name of egg-link in site-packages/

You can use a environment variable in your requirements.txt to store your dependency’s token value safe in your repo:

Example row in requrements.txt file for this case:

....

-e git+https://gitlab-ci-token:${EXPORTED_VAR_WITH_TOKEN}@gitlab.server.com/abc/SomePrivateLib.git@0.1.0#egg=SomePrivateLib
....
1

I was successful with these three options in GitLab. I am using version 11 of GitLab.

Option 1 - no token specified. The shell will prompt for username/password.

from setuptools import setup

TOKEN_VALUE = os.getenv('EXPORTED_VAR_WITH_TOKEN')

setup(
    install_requires=[
        "SomePrivateLib @ git+https://gitlab.server.com/abc/SomePrivateLib.git@0.1.0#egg=SomePrivateLib"
    ]
)

Option 2 - user access token specified. The token generated by going to GitLab → account top right → settings → access tokens. Create the token with read_repository rights.

Example:

import os
from setuptools import setup

TOKEN_VALUE = os.getenv('EXPORTED_VAR_WITH_TOKEN')

setup(
    install_requires=[
        f"SomePrivateLib @ git+https://gitlab-ci-token:{TOKEN_VALUE}@gitlab.server.com/abc/SomePrivateLib.git@0.1.0#egg=SomePrivateLib"
    ]
)

Option 3 - repository-level token specified. The token generated by going to the repository → settings → repository → deploy tokens. From here, create a token with read_repository rights.

Example:

import os
from setuptools import setup

TOKEN_USER = os.getenv('EXPORTED_TOKEN_USER')
TOKEN_VALUE = os.getenv('EXPORTED_VAR_WITH_TOKEN')

setup(
    install_requires=[
        f"SomePrivateLib @ git+https://{TOKEN_USER}:{TOKEN_VALUE}@gitlab.server.com/abc/SomePrivateLib.git@0.1.0#egg=SomePrivateLib"
    ]
)

In all three, I was able to do simply: "SomePrivateLib @ git+https://gitlab.server.com/abc/SomePrivateLib.git" without the #egg marking at the end.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.