5

Quick, and probably stupid, question: in a R markdown/knitr document, is it possible to put a function definition at the end of the doc (e.g. in an Appendix) after the function is actually called?

  • You can define the function at the beginning and hide it. Then, print the definition in the appendix. – wush978 Sep 21 '15 at 6:49
  • body(function_name) shows the function definition – user2034412 Sep 21 '15 at 7:01
11

Is it possible to put a function definition at the end of the document, after the function is actually called?

Technically, no. A function needs to be defined before it is called. However, as the question relates to knitr it should be rephrased:

Is it possible to show a function definition at the end of the document, after the function is actually called?

Yes, and there are several ways to achieve this. Note that options 2 and 3 can be found in Print highlighted source code of a function.

Option 1: Reuse chunks

Define the function before it is used.

```{r definition, echo = FALSE}
myfun <- function(x) {
  return(sprintf("You passed me %s", x))
}
```

Use the function:
```{r}
myfun(123)
```

Show the chunk where it was defined:
```{r definition, eval = FALSE}
```

An empty chunk with the same label as another non-empty chunk "inherits" the latter's code. This is described in How to reuse chunks. The code inside the chunk definition is hidden at first (echo = FALSE). Later, when the code is to be printed, use eval = FALSE in order to avoid evaluating the code again.

This option is handy when the function is defined in a separate chunk.

Option 2: Simple print

This is the simplest option but the output won't have syntax highlighting. Just define the function in a hidden chunk, use it and print the function definition later:

Define the function *before* it is used.

```{r definition, echo = FALSE}
myfun <- function(x) {
  return(sprintf("You passed me %s", x))
}
```

Use the function:
  ```{r}
myfun(123)
```


```{r}
myfun
```

Option 3: Generate a chunk containing the function definition

This option is described on Yihui's website. It uses the function insert_fun to generate a chunk that contains the function definition.

insert_fun = function(name) {
  read_chunk(lines = capture.output(dump(name, '')), labels = paste(name, 'source', sep = '-'))
}

This approach is very flexible because it doesn't matter if the function is defined in a separate chunk or in a file that is sourced.

insert_fun takes the name of an function (as character) and creates a chunk labelled functionname-source:

Define the function *before* it is used.

```{r definition, echo = FALSE}

# Define your function. 
myfun <- function(x) { 
  return(sprintf("You passed me %s", x))
}

library(knitr)

# Define insert_fun.
insert_fun = function(name) {
  read_chunk(lines = capture.output(dump(name, '')), labels = paste(name, 'source', sep = '-'))
}

insert_fun("myfun") # creates a chunk labelled "myfun-source"
```

Use the function:
  ```{r}
myfun(123)
```


```{r myfun-source, eval = FALSE}
```
  • hi there, just getting started with knitr; at the moment I am defining a function in a chunk and then reusing it 4 or 5 times to make a knitr pdf. Can i call the function from it's own script instead of defining it in the doc? is this what you allude to with option 3? – Sam Apr 18 '16 at 9:14
  • @Sam If you don't want to have the definition of the function in the main document, you can use code externalization or simply define the function in a separate R script and source that script (although this may defeat reproducibility). Option 3 in my answer above is about how to show a function that has been defined somewhere else. – CL. Apr 18 '16 at 9:19
  • @ CL. ah yes i understand what you're saying in option 3 now, and how it ties to pretty printing etc. I am happy enough for some functions to be sourced and some to be defined in document. I will experiment, thanks – Sam Apr 18 '16 at 9:25

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