16
List<AttendeeInfo> attendees = new List<AttendeeInfo>();
foreach ...
// Error: "There are too many target users in the email address array"
// for more than 100 attendees. So take the first 100 attendees only.
if(attendees.Count > 100) attendees = attendees.GetRange(0,100);
// or
if(attendees.Count > 100) attendees = attendees.Take(100).ToList();

Since I work on a list which is always longer than 100, and always take the first 100, the most obvious differences (Evaluation strategy, possibility to skip, throwing on errors) are not really interesting.

But perhaps you could shed some light on what exactly "Creates a shallow copy of a range of elements in the source List" means. It sounds really expensive, more so than Take, but is it?

1
  • I know you use a List in your example, but just as a point of note - if you are using an array you could do something like: int[] source = { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 }; IList<int> attendees = new ArraySegment<int>(source, 2, source.Length - 2); Which just creates a light wrapper around the array, skipping the first n (2 in this case) elements.
    – TVOHM
    Sep 21, 2015 at 16:13

6 Answers 6

28

The only difference is that List.GetRange is more efficient than Take(n).ToList() since it already knows the size of the new list whereas the LINQ methods don't know it's size.

So ToList enumerates the sequence and adds the items to a new list with a doubling algorithm increasing the backing array consecutively. List.GetRange can create the proper list with the right initial size beforehand and then uses Array.Copy to copy the subset of the source list into the new list [source].

10

It is much more faster. Check this out:

var list = Enumerable.Range(0, 1000).ToList();

var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();

stopwatch.Start();

for(var i=0; i<1000000; i++)
{
    var c = list.GetRange(0, 100);
}

Console.WriteLine(stopwatch.Elapsed);

stopwatch.Restart();

for (var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
{
     var c = list.Take(100).ToList();
}

Console.WriteLine(stopwatch.Elapsed);

Elapsed time:

List.GetRange() : 0.149 s

List.Take().ToList() : 3.625 s

1
  • Yes it is faster when you know the constraints. But if we don't know that the list has the desired elements, but does adding a check to count the number of items in the list before we call GetRange still make this faster? Mar 28 at 3:17
4

Here is GetRange implementation:

public List<T> GetRange(int index, int count)
{
    if (index < 0)
    {
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentOutOfRangeException(ExceptionArgument.index, ExceptionResource.ArgumentOutOfRange_NeedNonNegNum);
    }
    if (count < 0)
    {
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentOutOfRangeException(ExceptionArgument.count, ExceptionResource.ArgumentOutOfRange_NeedNonNegNum);
    }
    if ((this._size - index) < count)
    {
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentException(ExceptionResource.Argument_InvalidOffLen);
    }
    List<T> list = new List<T>(count);
    Array.Copy(this._items, index, list._items, 0, count); // Implemented natively
    list._size = count;
    return list;
}

And this is Take Implementation

public static IEnumerable<TSource> Take<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source, int count)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    }
    return TakeIterator<TSource>(source, count);
}

private static IEnumerable<TSource> TakeIterator<TSource>(IEnumerable<TSource> source, int count)
{
    if (count > 0)
    {
        foreach (TSource iteratorVariable0 in source)
        {
            yield return iteratorVariable0;
            if (--count == 0)
            {
                break;
            }
        }
    }
}

Plus ToList that simply does:

public static List<TSource> ToList<TSource>(this IEnumerable<TSource> source)
{
    if (source == null)
    {
        throw Error.ArgumentNull("source");
    }
    return new List<TSource>(source);
}

And List constructor:

public List(IEnumerable<T> collection)
{
    if (collection == null)
    {
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentNullException(ExceptionArgument.collection);
    }
    ICollection<T> is2 = collection as ICollection<T>;
    if (is2 != null)
    {
        int count = is2.Count;
        if (count == 0)
        {
            this._items = List<T>._emptyArray;
        }
        else
        {
            this._items = new T[count];
            is2.CopyTo(this._items, 0);
            this._size = count;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        this._size = 0;
        this._items = List<T>._emptyArray;
        using (IEnumerator<T> enumerator = collection.GetEnumerator())
        {
            while (enumerator.MoveNext())
            {
                this.Add(enumerator.Current);
            }
        }
    }
}

You can note immediately how much GetRange is cheaper against Take

1
  • 2
    You've omitted the constructor of List<T> which is the core functionality. Also, it's not obvious how efficient a method is if you just count code lines. Sep 21, 2015 at 9:35
4

List.Take(100).ToList(), would be more appropriate if you don't know the number of elements in the list. If it is less than 100, It would just take the ones available. it is more flexible to use this.

On the other hand, List.GetRange(0,100) assumes that the number of elements in the list is more than 100. You would however get this error ***

Offset and length were out of bounds for the array or count is greater than the number of elements from index to the end of the source collection

***. if the number of elements is less than the specified range.

For me, I would say that List.Take(100).ToList() is more generic since it doesn't restrict usage.

2

There is a minor between Take and GetRange. Take will evaluate lazily until you force it to evaulate into ToList(). This can change behavior.

Consider the pseudo code.

List<int> myList = new List<int>() {1,2,3,4,5,6};
IEnumerable<int> otherList = myList.Take(3);  // {1,2,3};
myList.RemoveRange(0,3);
// myList = {4, 5, 6}
// otherList = {4, 5, 6}

Now change this example to following code.

List<int> myList = new List<int>() {1,2,3,4,5,6};
IEnumerable<int> otherList = myList.Take(3).ToList();  // {1,2,3};
myList.RemoveRange(0,3);
// myList = {4, 5, 6}
// otherList = {1, 2, 3}

Doing ToList() can change the behavior of Take or GetRange depending upon what operations you are using next. It is always easier to use GetRange since it will not cause any unknown bugs.

Also GetRange is efficient.

1
  • Both behaviors are expected in the way the code is written, and each one may be desirable by the programmer.
    – fbiazi
    Jan 23, 2022 at 13:49
-1

I'll add to others by saying that if you don't need to call ToList on the result of Take, it is much faster than GetRange.

Removing the ToList from Kędrzu's example, you get:

var list = Enumerable.Range(0, 1000).ToList();

var stopwatch = new Stopwatch();

stopwatch.Start();

for(var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
{
    var c = list.GetRange(0, 100);
}

Console.WriteLine(stopwatch.Elapsed);

stopwatch.Restart();

for (var i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
{
     var c = list.Take(100);
}

Console.WriteLine(stopwatch.Elapsed);

Elapsed time:

List.GetRange() : 0.074s

List.Take() : 0.032s


Example of when you might not need to call ToList on the result of Take:

List<int> myList = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4 };

List<int> takeList = myList
    .Take(3)
    .Select(x => x + 2)
    .ToList();

List<int> getRangeList = myList
    .GetRange(0, 3)
    .Select(x => x + 2)
    .ToList();

No matter if I use Take or GetRange, I'm going to need to call ToList, so the time that takes doesn't factor into my decision between Take and GetRange.

2
  • 1
    list.Take(100) is almost no-op (for obvious reasons). Much more fair comparison would be to at least iterate both enumerables. Also this is not a way to perform a proper benchmarking.
    – Guru Stron
    Dec 22, 2023 at 0:45
  • Yeah, "if you don't need to call ToList", sure, but for a fair comparison you have to. Dec 22, 2023 at 10:13

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