1

I found that when x and y are autoboxed to 400the output is Not same but when x and y are autoboxed to 40 they are coming as same.Why??

public class Demo1 {
    public static void main(String args[]) {
         Integer x = 400, y = 400;
         if (x == y)
            System.out.println("Same");
         else
            System.out.println("Not Same");
    }
}
  • 3
    @Paul - no it isn't. This question is about the caching behavior of the primitive wrapper types. Comparing objects is a broader question ... and the answer you proposed as a duplicate isn't even about that. – Stephen C Sep 21 '15 at 12:31
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    I could not believe this behavior until I tried it. – gefei Sep 21 '15 at 12:33
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    This may well be duplicated but the duplicates are not good ones for this specific problem (caching specific Integers). Voted to reopen. – Bathsheba Sep 21 '15 at 12:35
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    I agree with @Bathsheba this question is not a duplicate of the ones provided. – NitrogenReaction Sep 21 '15 at 12:37
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    @AnilKumar yeah, sry. Thought it was just that usual BS about comparing objects. I've voted to reopen – Paul Sep 22 '15 at 11:43
4

As an optimisation, the JVM caches some Integer references (those from -128 to +127) when it starts up.

So an Integer equal to 40 will refer to one in that cache. That's why two references with value 40 will compare equal: they are both referring to the same cached object.

Since 400 is outside the cached range, an Integer reference set to 400 will not refer to a cached object, so two references with that value will not compare equal.

  • 1
    To add to this, == works in the cached case (40 in your example), because both instances x and y refer to the exact same object in the cache, whereas when you create x=400 and y=400, they refer to different objects in memory. – Jamie Sep 21 '15 at 12:36
2

This is because of the Java Integer cache. When a number is within the cache the reference is intilized to one from the cache instead of making a new object. In your case, 40 is within the cache so the object references are the same, but 400 is outside of the cache so the objects are not the same reference.See this answer.

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