56

I'm working on a client-side project which lets a user supply a video file and apply basic manipulations to it. I'm trying to extract the frames from the video reliably. At the moment I have a <video> which I'm loading selected video into, and then pulling out each frame as follows:

  1. Seek to the beginning
  2. Pause the video
  3. Draw <video> to a <canvas>
  4. Capture the frame from the canvas with .toDataUrl()
  5. Seek forward by 1 / 30 seconds (1 frame).
  6. Rinse and repeat

This is a rather inefficient process, and more specifically, is proving unreliable as I'm often getting stuck frames. This seems to be from it not updating the actual <video> element before it draws to the canvas.

I'd rather not have to upload the original video to the server just to split the frames, and then download them back to the client.

Any suggestions for a better way to do this are greatly appreciated. The only caveat is that I need it to work with any format the browser supports (decoding in JS isn't a great option).

3
  • instead of seeking 1/30s forward, you should attach a function on the timeupdate event of the video. But clearly, if you don't need to do it on client side, don't use a browser for that, ffmpeg or any video tool will be more powerfull for this.
    – Kaiido
    Sep 22, 2015 at 1:17
  • @Kalido I would much rather handle it server side, but the video comes from the client, and I need the frames on the client, so if I can avoid an upload/download cycle, I'd be much better off. Also, as far as seeking, I've had issues with slower devices dropping frames because they can't handle grabbing the frame data quickly enough, though, I'm not familiar with the timeupdate event, so I will look into it. Also, by specifying the seek time for each frame, I can control the framerate if need be. Sep 22, 2015 at 3:58
  • Ok, so please could you clarify this point (that it's for a website, client side) in an edit to your question, that wasn't clear at all. Also, the framerate in browser is absolutely not constant, so you should not rely on it. But at each new frame painted, the timeupdate event should trigger, so I believe it will be more reliable.
    – Kaiido
    Sep 22, 2015 at 4:03

2 Answers 2

65

[2021 update]: Since this question (and answer) has first been posted, things have evolved in this area, and it is finally time to make an update; the method that was exposed here went out-of-date, but luckily a few new or incoming APIs can help us better in extracting video frames:

The most promising and powerful one, but still under development, with a lot of restrictions: WebCodecs

This new API unleashes access to the media decoders and encoders, enabling us to access raw data from video frames (YUV planes), which may be a lot more useful for many applications than rendered frames; and for the ones who need rendered frames, the VideoFrame interface that this API exposes can be drawn directly to a <canvas> element or converted to an ImageBitmap, avoiding the slow route of the MediaElement.
However there is a catch, apart from its current low support, this API needs that the input has been demuxed already.
There are some demuxers online, for instance for MP4 videos GPAC's mp4box.js will help a lot.

A full example can be found on the proposal's repo.

The key part consists of

const decoder = new VideoDecoder({
  output: onFrame, // the callback to handle all the VideoFrame objects
  error: e => console.error(e),
});
decoder.configure(config); // depends on the input file, your demuxer should provide it
demuxer.start((chunk) => { // depends on the demuxer, but you need it to return chunks of video data
  decoder.decode(chunk); // will trigger our onFrame callback  
})

Note that we can even grab the frames of a MediaStream, thanks to MediaCapture Transform's MediaStreamTrackProcessor. This means that we should be able to combine HTMLMediaElement.captureStream() and this API in order to get our VideoFrames, without the need for a demuxer. However this is true only for a few codecs, and it means that we will extract frames at reading speed...
Anyway, here is an example working on latest Chromium based browsers, with chrome://flags/#enable-experimental-web-platform-features switched on:

const frames = [];
const button = document.querySelector("button");
const select = document.querySelector("select");
const canvas = document.querySelector("canvas");
const ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

button.onclick = async(evt) => {
  if (window.MediaStreamTrackProcessor) {
    let stopped = false;
    const track = await getVideoTrack();
    const processor = new MediaStreamTrackProcessor(track);
    const reader = processor.readable.getReader();
    readChunk();

    function readChunk() {
      reader.read().then(async({ done, value }) => {
        if (value) {
          const bitmap = await createImageBitmap(value);
          const index = frames.length;
          frames.push(bitmap);
          select.append(new Option("Frame #" + (index + 1), index));
          value.close();
        }
        if (!done && !stopped) {
          readChunk();
        } else {
          select.disabled = false;
        }
      });
    }
    button.onclick = (evt) => stopped = true;
    button.textContent = "stop";
  } else {
    console.error("your browser doesn't support this API yet");
  }
};

select.onchange = (evt) => {
  const frame = frames[select.value];
  canvas.width = frame.width;
  canvas.height = frame.height;
  ctx.drawImage(frame, 0, 0);
};

async function getVideoTrack() {
  const video = document.createElement("video");
  video.crossOrigin = "anonymous";
  video.src = "https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a4/BBH_gravitational_lensing_of_gw150914.webm";
  document.body.append(video);
  await video.play();
  const [track] = video.captureStream().getVideoTracks();
  video.onended = (evt) => track.stop();
  return track;
}
video,canvas {
  max-width: 100%
}
<button>start</button>
<select disabled>
</select>
<canvas></canvas>

The easiest to use, but still with relatively poor browser support, and subject to the browser dropping frames: HTMLVideoElement.requestVideoFrameCallback

This method allows us to schedule a callback to whenever a new frame will be painted on the HTMLVideoElement.
It is higher level than WebCodecs, and thus may have more latency, and moreover, with it we can only extract frames at reading speed.

const frames = [];
const button = document.querySelector("button");
const select = document.querySelector("select");
const canvas = document.querySelector("canvas");
const ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

button.onclick = async(evt) => {
  if (HTMLVideoElement.prototype.requestVideoFrameCallback) {
    let stopped = false;
    const video = await getVideoElement();
    const drawingLoop = async(timestamp, frame) => {
      const bitmap = await createImageBitmap(video);
      const index = frames.length;
      frames.push(bitmap);
      select.append(new Option("Frame #" + (index + 1), index));

      if (!video.ended && !stopped) {
        video.requestVideoFrameCallback(drawingLoop);
      } else {
        select.disabled = false;
      }
    };
    // the last call to rVFC may happen before .ended is set but never resolve
    video.onended = (evt) => select.disabled = false;
    video.requestVideoFrameCallback(drawingLoop);
    button.onclick = (evt) => stopped = true;
    button.textContent = "stop";
  } else {
    console.error("your browser doesn't support this API yet");
  }
};

select.onchange = (evt) => {
  const frame = frames[select.value];
  canvas.width = frame.width;
  canvas.height = frame.height;
  ctx.drawImage(frame, 0, 0);
};

async function getVideoElement() {
  const video = document.createElement("video");
  video.crossOrigin = "anonymous";
  video.src = "https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a4/BBH_gravitational_lensing_of_gw150914.webm";
  document.body.append(video);
  await video.play();
  return video;
}
video,canvas {
  max-width: 100%
}
<button>start</button>
<select disabled>
</select>
<canvas></canvas>

For your Firefox users, Mozilla's non-standard HTMLMediaElement.seekToNextFrame()

As its name implies, this will make your <video> element seek to the next frame.
Combining this with the seeked event, we can build a loop that will grab every frame of our source, faster than reading speed (yeah!).
But this method is proprietary, available only in Gecko based browsers, not on any standard tracks, and probably gonna be removed in the future when they'll implement the methods exposed above.
But for the time being, it is the best option for Firefox users:

const frames = [];
const button = document.querySelector("button");
const select = document.querySelector("select");
const canvas = document.querySelector("canvas");
const ctx = canvas.getContext("2d");

button.onclick = async(evt) => {
  if (HTMLMediaElement.prototype.seekToNextFrame) {
    let stopped = false;
    const video = await getVideoElement();
    const requestNextFrame = (callback) => {
      video.addEventListener("seeked", () => callback(video.currentTime), {
        once: true
      });
      video.seekToNextFrame();
    };
    const drawingLoop = async(timestamp, frame) => {
      if(video.ended) {
        select.disabled = false;
        return; // FF apparently doesn't like to create ImageBitmaps
                // from ended videos...
      }
      const bitmap = await createImageBitmap(video);
      const index = frames.length;
      frames.push(bitmap);
      select.append(new Option("Frame #" + (index + 1), index));

      if (!video.ended && !stopped) {
        requestNextFrame(drawingLoop);
      } else {
        select.disabled = false;
      }
    };
    requestNextFrame(drawingLoop);
    button.onclick = (evt) => stopped = true;
    button.textContent = "stop";
  } else {
    console.error("your browser doesn't support this API yet");
  }
};

select.onchange = (evt) => {
  const frame = frames[select.value];
  canvas.width = frame.width;
  canvas.height = frame.height;
  ctx.drawImage(frame, 0, 0);
};

async function getVideoElement() {
  const video = document.createElement("video");
  video.crossOrigin = "anonymous";
  video.src = "https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/a4/BBH_gravitational_lensing_of_gw150914.webm";
  document.body.append(video);
  await video.play();
  return video;
}
video,canvas {
  max-width: 100%
}
<button>start</button>
<select disabled>
</select>
<canvas></canvas>

The least reliable, that did stop working over time: HTMLVideoElement.ontimeupdate

The strategy pause - draw - play - wait for timeupdate used to be (in 2015) a quite reliable way to know when a new frame got painted to the element, but since then, browsers have put serious limitations on this event which was firing at great rate and now there isn't much information we can grab from it...

I am not sure I can still advocate for its use, I didn't check how Safari (which is currently the only one without a solution) handles this event (their handling of medias is very weird for me), and there is a good chance that a simple setTimeout(fn, 1000 / 30) loop is actually more reliable in most of the cases.

29
  • 2
    My assumption is not that there will be a new frame every 30th of a second, but if I get 1 frame every 1/30 seconds, I will end up with 30 FPS. The mistake I made is assuming that the frames I get will actually be the correct and current frame. I appreciate the help. The timeupdate event is very helpful. TY :) Sep 22, 2015 at 5:31
  • 2
    This method isn't exactly reliable: It once returns 4172 frames, and then 4573 on a second run, on a video which really has just 250 frames according to ffmpeg. 10 seconds @ 25 fps: w3schools.com/html/mov_bbb.mp4 Nov 23, 2016 at 14:50
  • 1
    @DineshBolkensteyn, did you read the header of this answer and the linked answer? No this method doesn't extract reliabily all video frames that ae in the file, just the ones that has been painted by the browser, which doesn't respect video's framerate.
    – Kaiido
    Nov 23, 2016 at 23:06
  • timeupdate fires about 5 times per second, definitely not a good way to get all the frames.
    – fregante
    Mar 22, 2018 at 2:52
  • 1
    @Kaiido OK, then I understand. No, I couldn't find a good term for it, so "play through speed" was just my re-wording.
    – HenrikSN
    Sep 10, 2021 at 8:19
22

Here's a working function that was tweaked from this question:

async function extractFramesFromVideo(videoUrl, fps=25) {
  return new Promise(async (resolve) => {

    // fully download it first (no buffering):
    let videoBlob = await fetch(videoUrl).then(r => r.blob());
    let videoObjectUrl = URL.createObjectURL(videoBlob);
    let video = document.createElement("video");

    let seekResolve;
    video.addEventListener('seeked', async function() {
      if(seekResolve) seekResolve();
    });

    video.src = videoObjectUrl;

    // workaround chromium metadata bug (https://stackoverflow.com/q/38062864/993683)
    while((video.duration === Infinity || isNaN(video.duration)) && video.readyState < 2) {
      await new Promise(r => setTimeout(r, 1000));
      video.currentTime = 10000000*Math.random();
    }
    let duration = video.duration;

    let canvas = document.createElement('canvas');
    let context = canvas.getContext('2d');
    let [w, h] = [video.videoWidth, video.videoHeight]
    canvas.width =  w;
    canvas.height = h;

    let frames = [];
    let interval = 1 / fps;
    let currentTime = 0;

    while(currentTime < duration) {
      video.currentTime = currentTime;
      await new Promise(r => seekResolve=r);

      context.drawImage(video, 0, 0, w, h);
      let base64ImageData = canvas.toDataURL();
      frames.push(base64ImageData);

      currentTime += interval;
    }
    resolve(frames);
  });
});

}

Usage:

let frames = await extractFramesFromVideo("https://example.com/video.webm");

Note that there's currently no easy way to determine the actual/natural frame rate of a video unless perhaps you use ffmpeg.js, but that's a 10+ megabyte javascript file (since it's an emscripten port of the actual ffmpeg library, which is obviously huge).

9
  • 2
    Interesting that I happened upon this just after your answer. I was going to give a similar (but far less detailed) answer pointing on the problems with using ontimeupdate and suggesting using a solution that sets video.currentTime instead. Excellent work!
    – undefined
    Sep 19, 2018 at 21:43
  • 1
    Do we have to create new canvas every time? Since its like a temp variable, can we use just one? which is better in terms of performance? Mar 16, 2019 at 12:43
  • 2
    @ParthibanRajendran You can use an existing canvas and clear it before starting to draw on it. This is actually probably better for performance if it suits your needs!
    – Lynn
    Mar 18, 2019 at 19:44
  • Uncaught SyntaxError: await is only valid in async function? referring to let frames = await...
    – conner.xyz
    Nov 6, 2019 at 17:09
  • how many frames can we extract using this? Nov 30, 2021 at 14:59

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