Working on a mixed framework. imported inside the Obj-C file but the internal classes are not visible, only the public ones.

The documentation clearly states the internal clasees should be available between Swift and Obj-C:

Importing Swift into Objective-C
To import a set of Swift files in the same framework target as your Objective-C code, you don’t need to import anything into the umbrella header for the framework. Instead, import the Xcode-generated header file for your Swift code into any Objective-C .m file you want to use your Swift code from. Because the generated header for a framework target is part of the framework’s public interface, only declarations marked with the public modifier appear in the generated header for a framework target. You can still use Swift methods and properties that are marked with the internal modifier from within the Objective-C part of your framework, as long they are declared within a class that inherits from an Objective-C class. For more information on access-level modifiers, see Access Control in The Swift Programming Language (Swift 2).

Code Sample (Create a new project with a framework)

// SwiftObject.swift

public class SwiftObject: NSObject {
    public class func doSomething() {}
}

internal class YetAnotherSwiftObject: NSObject {
    internal class func doSomething() {}
}

// SomeObject.m file

@implementation SomeObject

- (void)someMethod {
    [SwiftObject doSomething];
}

- (void)someOtherMethod {
    [YetAnotherSwiftObject doSomething]; // Use of undeclared identifier
}

@end
up vote 17 down vote accepted
+100

As indicated in the docs, declarations marked with internal modifier don't appear in the generated header, so the compiler does not know about them and thus complaints. Of course, you could send messages using performSelector approach, but that's not convenient and bug-prone. We just need to help the compiler know that those declarations are there.

First, we need to use @objc attribute variant that allows you to specify name for your symbol in Objective-C:

// SwiftObject.swift

@objc(SWIFTYetAnotherSwiftObject)
internal class YetAnotherSwiftObject: NSObject {
    internal class func doSomething() {}
}

And then you just need to create @interface declaration with the methods you want to use in your code - so the compiler will be happy, and also apply SWIFT_CLASS macro with the symbol name you've specified earlier - so the linker would pick the actual implementation:

// SomeObject.m file

SWIFT_CLASS("SWIFTYetAnotherSwiftObject")
@interface YetAnotherSwiftObject : NSObject

+ (void)doSomething;

@end


@implementation SomeObject

- (void)someOtherMethod {
    [YetAnotherSwiftObject doSomething]; // Should work now !!!
}

@end
  • I've used the interface declaration in .m file just for clarity, the better option would be to combine such declarations in .h file, and include it.
  • By declaring methods in that interface we're making a promise to compiler, and it won't complain if you'll put there a method that does not exist (or with wrong signature, etc.) Obviously, you'll crash in runtime in that case - so be cautious.
  • Nice! I did not know about that macro and google doesn't show much. Do you have any reference from the Apple docs? – Yariv Oct 21 '15 at 20:51
  • 4
    Nice? This is horribly verbose and messy. Is this really what you need to do? I have run into the same problem, and even apple should have managed to do something better than this. I'm going to give up on this and go back to objective c, this is unreasonable! +1 for posting something that actually works (after hours of searching). – Tore Rudberg Feb 15 '16 at 10:43
  • 3
    According to Apple documentation "You can still use Swift methods and properties that are marked with the internal modifier from within the Objective-C part of your framework, as long they are declared within a class that inherits from an Objective-C class", if the swift class derives from another objc class it should be available in objc code. I have similar problem and I have marked my swift class with @objc and it inherits from NSObject but still not available in objc code. – puru020 Mar 18 '16 at 16:49

For me it just worked by checking: "Allow app extension API only". You find it by going to the project setting, select your target and then it is in the General tab under Deployment Info.

Can someone explain to me, why this does solve the problem?

  • I love you ! LOL . That's the only place on earth that found the answer to bypass this stupid limitation. No framework should be required to expose its Swift classes to API consumers just to be able to interop with internal ObjC code! – nobre Jul 7 '16 at 19:05
  • Be careful of trying this option! It will list the class & methods in auto generated header. Use it only if you don't care about keeping those private. – Amit Jan 27 '17 at 12:01
  • But with this checked, there will be a bunch of Cocoa API missing. – Martin Jan 10 at 9:35

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