90

I have a code where certain tests will always fail in CI environment. I would like to disable them based on an environment condition.

How to programmatically skip a test in mocha during the runtime execution?

  • 3
    Programmatically skipping a test is covered by this.skip() in mochajs.org/#inclusive-tests and @zatziky's answer below. The rest of the answers are obsolete for Mocha v3+ – Patrick May 29 '17 at 13:16
  • 1
    describe.skip('description', () => {}) / describe.only('description', () => {}) / it.skip('description', () => {}) / it.only('description', () => {}) – Jun711 Feb 21 '18 at 10:16
  • any accepted answer? – Paul Rooney Nov 7 '18 at 23:49

14 Answers 14

123

You can skip tests by placing an x in front of the describe or it block, or placing a .skip after it.

xit('should work', function (done) {});

describe.skip('features', function() {});

You can also run a single test by placing a .only on the test. for instance

describe('feature 1', function() {});
describe.only('feature 2', function() {});
describe('feature 3', function() {});

Only the feature 2 block would run in this case.

There doesn't appear to be a way to programmatically skip tests, but you could just do some sort of check in a beforeEach statement and only run the test if the flag was set.

beforeEach(function(){
    if (wrongEnvironment){
        runTest = false
    }
}

describe('feature', function(){
    if(runTest){
         it('should work', function(){
            // Test would not run or show up if runTest was false,
         }
    }
}
  • 6
    Your 2nd attempt at a solution won't work, because the order of execution is not the one you think. When the beforeEach call executes, Mocha records anonymous function (the "hook") for future use, when the describe call executes, Mocha immediately executes the anonymous function passed to it. So by the time if (runTest) is executed, the beforeEach hook won't have run. – Louis Apr 25 '16 at 11:03
  • 9
    How does this answer have 27 upvotes? The question asks about programmatically skipping tests, so adding ".skip" or ".only" is not helpful. Then it explicitly says you can't do what the OP wants to do, despite the fact that other answers tell you how to do it. – Graeme Perrow Sep 20 '16 at 14:47
  • @Louis your point is correct. I have same issue where my test run/skip info will be known only after beforeEach. Is there any way to achieve it? – Ponmudi VN Mar 28 '17 at 8:40
  • Won't work, not an answer to the question, see @Gajus' response instead – NorTicUs Jul 6 '17 at 9:02
  • This answer has merits for a different question that wasn't asked here. I don't have the power to change anything here. See the this.skip() answer. – Andrew Martinez Aug 13 '18 at 20:25
63

There is an undocumented way of programmatically skipping tests:

// test.js

describe('foo', function() {
  before(function() {
    this.skip();
  });

  it('foo', function() {
    // will not run
    console.log('This will not be printed');
  });
});

running:

$ mocha test.js


  foo
    - foo


  0 passing (9ms)
  1 pending

This is discussed in https://github.com/mochajs/mocha/issues/1901.

  • 8
    Readers might like to know that this marks the entire describe as skipped (i.e. all the tests in the describe are skipped). – Louis Sep 28 '15 at 10:24
  • 2
    Thats correct. You can skip specific tests too. – Gajus Sep 28 '15 at 11:35
  • 4
    No longer undocumented: mochajs.org – Dean Radcliffe May 10 '17 at 17:57
  • Mocha's "pending tests" documentation: mochajs.org/#pending-tests – lasec0203 Dec 19 '17 at 5:20
  • describe.skip('description', () => {}) / describe.only('description', () => {}) / it.skip('description', () => {}) / it.only('description', () => {}) – Jun711 Feb 21 '18 at 10:15
26

This answer does work for ES6.

Instead of:

describe('your describe block', () => {

You want:

(condition ? describe : describe.skip)('your describe block', () => {

This conditionally skips all tests in the describe block IF the condition is false.

Or, instead of:

it('your it block', () => {

You want:

(condition ? it : it.skip)('your it block', () => {

This conditionally skips one test IF the condition is false.

  • 3
    I get what you are suggesting but you first need to define a contextual describe like this : const contextualDescribe = shouldAvoidTests ? describe.skip : describe then you can use it : contextualDescribe('your it block', () => { – Ser Oct 18 '17 at 16:37
  • 3
    @Ser To get on a single line, I used something like this: (condition ? describe : describe.skip)('your describe block', () => { – joshden Dec 21 '17 at 16:44
  • How to do this async? I need to look up the skip condition based on a redis flag, which is an async operation (we store feature flags in redis). – Patrick Finnigan Mar 17 '18 at 19:13
  • been a while but ive had this kind of need before too, i think i just wrapped all the mocha stuff in a function that was called after the async callback completed - cant remember the exact details – danday74 Mar 17 '18 at 20:21
  • thats really elegant – Jonathan Dec 14 '18 at 1:16
22

I use runtime skipping from Mocha for the same scenario as you're describing. It is the copy paste from the docs:

it('should only test in the correct environment', function() {
  if (/* check test environment */) {
    // make assertions
  } else {
    this.skip();
  }
});

As you can see, it skips the test based on environment. My own condition is if(process.env.NODE_ENV === 'continuous-integration').

  • 3
    this is a much simpler solution than the others. +1 – Ulad Kasach Mar 1 '18 at 1:36
5

It depends how you want to programmatically skip the test. If the conditions for skipping can be determined before any test code is run, then you can just call it or it.skip as needed, based on a condition. For instance, this will skip some tests if the environment variable ONE is set to any value:

var conditions = {
    "condition one": process.env["ONE"] !== undefined
    // There could be more conditions in this table...
};

describe("conditions that can be determined ahead of time", function () {
    function skip_if(condition, name, callback) {
        var fn = conditions[condition] ? it.skip: it;
        fn(name, callback);
    };

    skip_if("condition one", "test one", function () {
        throw new Error("skipped!");
    });

    // async.
    skip_if("condition one", "test one (async)", function (done) {
        throw new Error("skipped!");
    });

    skip_if("condition two", "test two", function () {
        console.log("test two!");
    });

});

If the conditions you want to check can only be determined at test time, it is a bit more complicated. If you do not want to access anything not strictly speaking part of the testing API, then you could do this:

describe("conditions that can be determined at test time", function () {
    var conditions = {};
    function skip_if(condition, name, callback) {
        if (callback.length) {
            it(name, function (done) {
                if (conditions[condition])
                    done();
                else
                    callback(done);
            });
        }
        else {
            it(name, function () {
                if (conditions[condition])
                    return;
                callback();
            });
        }
    };

    before(function () {
        conditions["condition one"] = true;
    });

    skip_if("condition one", "test one", function () {
        throw new Error("skipped!");
    });

    // async.
    skip_if("condition one", "test one (async)", function (done) {
        throw new Error("skipped!");
    });

    skip_if("condition two", "test two", function () {
        console.log("test two!");
    });

});

Whereas my first example was marking the tests as formally skipped (aka "pending"), the method I've just shown will just avoid performing the actual test but the tests won't be marked as formally skipped. They will be marked as passed. If you absolutely want to have them skipped I don't know of any way short of accessing parts that are not properly speaking part of the testing API:

describe("conditions that can be determined at test time", function () {
    var condition_to_test = {}; // A map from condition names to tests.
    function skip_if(condition, name, callback) {
        var test = it(name, callback);
        if (!condition_to_test[condition])
            condition_to_test[condition] = [];
        condition_to_test[condition].push(test);
    };

    before(function () {
        condition_to_test["condition one"].forEach(function (test) {
            test.pending = true; // Skip the test by marking it pending!
        });
    });

    skip_if("condition one", "test one", function () {
        throw new Error("skipped!");
    });

    // async.
    skip_if("condition one", "test one (async)", function (done) {
        throw new Error("skipped!");
    });

    skip_if("condition two", "test two", function () {
        console.log("test two!");
    });

});
2

We can write a nice clean wrapper function to conditionally run tests as follows:

function ifConditionIt(title, test) {
  // Define your condition here
  return condition ? it(title, test) : it.skip(title, test);
}

This can then be required and used in your tests as follows:

ifConditionIt('Should be an awesome test', (done) => {
  // Test things
  done();
});
1

You can use my package mocha-assume to skip tests programmatically, but only from outside the tests. You use it like this:

assuming(myAssumption).it("does someting nice", () => {});

Mocha-assume will only run your test when myAssumption is true, otherwise it will skip it (using it.skip) with a nice message.

Here's a more detailed example:

describe("My Unit", () => {
    /* ...Tests that verify someAssuption is always true... */

    describe("when [someAssumption] holds...", () => {
        let someAssumption;

        beforeAll(() => {
            someAssumption = /* ...calculate assumption... */
        });

        assuming(someAssumption).it("Does something cool", () => {
            /* ...test something cool... */
        });
    });
});

Using it this way, you can avoid cascading failures. Say the test "Does something cool" would always fail when someAssumption does not hold - But this assumption was already tested above (in Tests that verify someAssuption is always true").

So the test failure does not give you any new information. In fact, it is even a false-positive: The test did not fail because "something cool" did not work, but because a precondition for the test was not satisfied. with mocha-assume you can often avoid such false positives.

1

I am not sure if this qualifies as „programmatic skipping“, but in order to selectively skip some specific tests for our CI environment, I use Mocha's tagging feature (https://github.com/mochajs/mocha/wiki/Tagging). In describe() or it() messages, you can add a tag like @no-ci. To exclude those tests, you could define a specific "ci target" in your package.json and use --grep and --invert parameters like:

"scripts": {
  "test": "mocha",
  "test-ci" : "mocha --reporter mocha-junit-reporter --grep @no-ci --invert"
}
1

to skip tests, use describe.skip or it.skip

describe('Array', function() {
  describe.skip('#indexOf()', function() {
    // ...
  });
});

to include tests you could use describe.only

describe('Array', function() {
  describe.only('#indexOf()', function() {
    // ...
  });
});

More info at https://mochajs.org/#inclusive-tests

0

Say I wanted to skip my parametrized test if my test description contained the string "foo", I would do this:

// Skip parametrized test if description contains the string "foo"
(test.description.indexOf("foo") === -1 ? it : it.skip)("should test something", function (done) {
    // Code here
});

// Parametrized tests
describe("testFoo", function () {
        test({
            description: "foo" // This will skip
        });
        test({
            description: "bar" // This will be tested
        });
});

In your case, I believe that if you wanted to check environment variables, you could use NodeJS's:

process.env.ENV_VARIABLE

For example (Warning: I haven't tested this bit of code!), maybe something like this:

(process.env.NODE_ENV.indexOf("prod") === -1 ? it : it.skip)("should...", function(done) {
    // Code here
});

Where you can set ENV_VARIABLE to be whatever you are keying off of, and using that value, skip or run the test. (FYI the documentation for the NodeJS' process.env is here: https://nodejs.org/api/process.html#process_process_env)

I won't take complete credit for the first part of this solution, I found and tested the answer and it worked perfectly to skip tests based on a simple condition through this resource: https://github.com/mochajs/mocha/issues/591

Hope this helps! :)

0
mocha test/ --grep <pattern>

https://mochajs.org/

0

This is not really using mocha's features, rather tweaking it to get the behaviour I wanted.

I wanted to skip any subsequent 'it's' in my protractor mocha tests and one 'it' failed. This was because once one step of a journey test failed it was almost certain the rest would fail, and may take a long time and hog the build server if they are using browser waits for elements to appear on a page etc.

When just running standard mocha tests (not protractor) this can be achieved with global beforeEach and afterEach hooks by attaching a 'skipSubsequent' flag to the test's parent (describe) like this:

    beforeEach(function() {
      if(this.currentTest.parent.skipSubsequent) {
            this.skip();
      }
    }); 


    afterEach(function() {
      if (this.currentTest.state === 'failed') {
        this.currentTest.parent.skipSubsequent = 'true'
      }
    })

When attempting this with protractor and mocha it the scope of 'this' has changed and the code above does not work. You end up with an error message like 'error calling done()' and protractor halts.

Instead I ended up with the code below. Not the prettiest, but it ends up replacing the implementation of remaining test functions with a this.skip(). This will probably stop working if/when the internals of mocha change with later versions.

It was figured out through some trial and error by debugging and inspecting mocha's internals...helps make browser test suites complete sooner when the tests fail though.

beforeEach(function() {

    var parentSpec = this.currentTest.parent;

    if (!parentSpec.testcount) {
        parentSpec.testCount = parentSpec.tests.length;
        parentSpec.currentTestIndex = 0;
    } else {
        parentSpec.currentTestIndex = parentSpec.currentTestIndex + 1;
    }

    if (parentSpec.skipSubsequent) {

        parentSpec.skipSubsequent = false;
        var length = parentSpec.tests.length;
        var currentIndex = parentSpec.currentTestIndex;

        for (var i = currentIndex + 1; i < length; i++) {
            parentSpec.tests[i].fn = function() {
                this.skip();
            };
        }
    }
});


afterEach(function() {
    if (this.currentTest.state === 'failed') {
        this.currentTest.parent.skipSubsequent = 'true'
    }
});
-2

As @danielstjules answered here there is a way to skip test. @author of this topic has copied answer from github.com mochajs discussion, but there is no info in what version of mocha it available.

I'm using grunt-mocha-test module for integrating mocha test functionality in my project. Jumping to last (for now) version - 0.12.7 bring me mocha version 2.4.5 with implementation of this.skip().

So, in my package.json

  "devDependencies": {
    "grunt-mocha-test": "^0.12.7",
    ...

And then

npm install

And it make me happy with this hook:

describe('Feature', function() {

    before(function () {

        if (!Config.isFeaturePresent) {

            console.log('Feature not configured for that env, skipping...');
            this.skip();
        }
    });
...

    it('should return correct response on AB', function (done) {

        if (!Config.isABPresent) {

           return this.skip();
        }

        ...
-3

Please don't. A test that doesn't work consistently across environments should be acknowledged as such by your build infrastructure. And it can be very disorienting when the CI builds have a different number of tests run than local.

Also it screws up repeatability. If different tests run on the server and local I can have tests failing in dev and passing in CI or vice versa. There's no forcing function and I have no way to quickly and accurately correct a failed build.

If you must turn off tests between environments, instead of conditionally running tests, tag your tests and use a filter to eliminate tests that don't work in certain build targets. That way everybody knows what's going on and it tempers their expectations. It also lets everybody know that there's inconsistency in the test framework, and someone might have a solution that gets them running properly again. If you just mute the test they might not even know there's a problem.

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