3

I have a function that takes a pointer to a pointer, and fills in the value:

void GetSensor(Sensor **sensor);

Normally, I have to do this to create the sensor and free it:

Sensor *sensor;
GetSensor(&sensor);
// Do something with the sensor
delete sensor;

Now I would like to use an std::unique_ptr for the same task. I know I can do this:

std::unique_ptr<Sensor> safe_sensor;
Sensor *sensor;
GetSensor(&sensor);
safe_sensor.reset(sensor);
// Do something with the sensor
// safe_sensor will free the sensor pointer

Can I somehow avoid the step with the temporary sensor variable? Would this work?

std::unique_ptr<Sensor> safe_sensor;
GetSensor(&safe_sensor.get());
// Do something with the sensor
// Will the free work correctly here?
  • 2
    unique_ptr::get returns a pointer, not a reference to a pointer – Piotr Skotnicki Sep 23 '15 at 11:35
  • @Angew: Nope, was not intentional. Should be fixed – Jan Rüegg Sep 23 '15 at 11:45
  • @PiotrSkotnicki You're right... I guess thats one of the problems. – Jan Rüegg Sep 23 '15 at 11:47
7

The simplest is to wrap your code into a function:

std::unique_ptr<Sensor> make_safe_sensor()
{
    Sensor *sensor;
    GetSensor(&sensor);
    return std::unique_ptr<Sensor>(sensor);
}

std::unique_ptr doesn't give access to the reference to its owning pointer.

  • 1
    Not really an answer to my question, since the temporary variable is still here... this solution requires even more code than the initial example... – Jan Rüegg Sep 23 '15 at 11:48
  • To end the suspense I would stress the last line in the answer above - "std::unique_ptr doesn't give access to the reference to its owning pointer." i.e. the answer is "no, you cannot". If you like it more you can make yourself some undefined behaviour with the call: GetSensor(&(Sensor*&)((char*&)(safe_sensor))); relying that internally the first bytes of the unique_ptr are std::tuple<pointer, deleter> i.e the first member of the tuple is the pointer :D I would NEVER use that but it compiles and runs seemingly ok with simple Sensor struct – user2026095 Sep 23 '15 at 12:54
  • 1
    @JanRüegg While true that it is "more code", it is now safer code since you no longer use that unsafe GetSensor call directly, you always use this make_safe_sensor function instead. Now, if you could change GetSensor so that it returns a std::unique_ptr instead of taking a double pointer, then you would be making even better improvements. – Andre Kostur Sep 23 '15 at 13:47

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