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I have two modules in application. Module1 owns and builds boost::geometry::index::rtree. Module2 makes queries to Module1, which are passed to RTree. Now I want to speed up and have several Module2 instances, which make queries to one Module1 instance, and work separately. I am 100% sure, that while any Module2 working RTree does not change.

I've found this question: Can I use Boost.Geometry.index.rtree with threads?, but it describes more complicated case, when rtree is modified and queried from different threads. And this answer is ambiguous: "No boost Rtree is not thread-safe in any way" is stated in answer. But in comments it is stated: "It is safe to do queries, and it even possible to create workaround for creation". What is right answer? Are there any resources, except ask direct question to boost authors, to find out?

Tl;dr:

Is it safe to make queries to boost::geometry::index::rtree from different threads, if I am 100% sure, that no thread modifies RTree?

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    The answer to your question seems to be contained in the answer to the question you linked (right at the bottom). – Rostislav Sep 23 '15 at 12:28
  • possible duplicate of Can I use Boost.Geometry.index.rtree with threads? – erasmortg Sep 23 '15 at 12:41
  • @Rostislav In answer to linked question: "No boost Rtree is not thread-safe in any way". But in comments: "It is safe to do queries, and it even possible to create workaround for creation". Who is right? – DoctorMoisha Sep 23 '15 at 12:47
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In answer to linked question: "No boost Rtree is not thread-safe in any way". But in comments: "It is safe to do queries, and it even possible to create workaround for creation". Who is right?

There is no contradiction. Adam is the author. Everyone is right. Note that the answer also said

You /can/ run multiple read-only operations in parallel. Usually, library containers are safe to use from multiple threads for read-only operations (although you might want to do a quick scan for any mutable members hidden (in the implementation).

In general, as long as the bitwise representation doesn't mutate, everything is safe for concurrent access. This is regardless of library support.

Note that you don't need that "quick scan" as it happens, because of the authoritative comment by Adam Wulkiewicz.


Footnote: that still doesn't make the library thread safe. That is simply true because the memory model of C++ is free of data races with bitwise constant data.

  • Usually, library containers are safe I really don't like that usually. SomeContainer::get in fact can rearrange container, or it can use some internal class variable and read/write it's state. For example ISO CPP 11 states, that std::vector concurrent reads must be thread-safe, so okay, I can rely on it. On what information can I rely regarding boost RTree? – DoctorMoisha Sep 23 '15 at 14:08
  • Would you like me to repeat what I said? If that's not good enough, you should file a request at the developer list, maybe. (Re.: "Usually" - I qualifed precisely what conditions apply and why you can rely on it for rtree.) – sehe Sep 23 '15 at 14:10
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    Sorry, I've reread answer and decided to google Adam Wulkiewicz, who seems to be contributor to boost::geometry. So it is guarantee, that I expected. – DoctorMoisha Sep 23 '15 at 14:15
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This doesn't seem to be the full question. What I'm reading is in two parts. The first part should be "I want to optimise my program. How should I go about doing that?"

You should use a profiler to take measurements before the optimisation! You might notice in the process that there are more significant optimisations available to you, and those might be pushed out of the window of possibility if you introduce multithreading prematurely.

You should use a profiler to take measurements after the optimisation! It's not uncommon for an optimisation to be found to be insignificant. In terms of multithreading optimisations, from your measurements you should see that processing one task takes slightly longer but that you can process between four and eight at once on a computer that has a four core CPU. If the slightly longer equates to a factor of 4-8x, then obviously multithreading is an unnecessary introduction of bloat and not an optimisation.

The second part, you have provided, in the form of these two statements:

I am 100% sure, that while any Module2 working RTree does not change.

Is it safe to make queries to boost::geometry::index::rtree from different threads, if I am 100% sure, that no thread modifies RTree?

You should use locks. If you don't, you'll be invoking undefined behaviour. I'll explain why you should use locks later.

I would recommend using a read/write lock (e.g. pthread_rwlock_t) for the usecase you have described. This will allow your threads to access the resource simultaneously so long as no threads are attempting to write, and provide a fence for updates to be pushed to threads.

Why should you use locks? First and foremost, they guarantee that your code will function correctly; any concerns regarding whether it's safe become invalid. Secondly, a lock provides a fence at which updates can be pushed to the thread; any concerns regarding the performance implications should be negligible when compared to the amount of gain you should see from this.

You should perform more than one task with each thread! This is why a fence is important. If your threads end up terminating and you end up creating new ones later on, you are incurring an overhead which is of course undesirable when performing an optimisation. If a thread terminates despite more of these tasks foreseen later, then that thread probably should have been suspended instead.

Expect that your optimisation might turn into a work-stealing thread pool. That is the nature of optimisations, when we're targeting the most significant one. Occasionally it is the most significant by far or perhaps the only bottleneck, after all. Optimising such bottlenecks might require extreme measures.

I emphasized "should be negligible" earlier because you're only likely to see a significant improvement in performance up to a point; it should make sense that attempting to fire up 10000 threads (each occupying between 0.5 and 4.0MB stack space for a total of 5-40GB) on a processor that has 4 cores (2500 threads per core) is not going to be very optimal. Nonetheless, this is where many people go wrong, and if they have a profiler guiding them they'll be more likely to notice...

You might even get away with running multiple tasks on one thread, if your tasks involve IO that can be made non-blocking. That's usually an optimisation I'll look into before I look at multithreading, as the profiler will highlight.

  • I appreciate your good intentions, but my question was precise. I'm asking this, because I know which optimization I want, and I don't want to use any locks. – DoctorMoisha Sep 23 '15 at 14:20
  • @DoctorMoisha If you're only performing one task per thread (and then the thread terminates), you're missing out on potential benefits of this optimisation. A large part of the bottleneck that multithreading introduces is at the start, when spinning up the thread. If you're spinning up threads for the purpose of performing one task, letting the threads terminate and then spinning up more threads, then you'll be losing efficiency compared to a thread pool that suspends and syncs when resumed after completing each job. I've attempted to elaborate that in my answer, but I'm not in the best space. – autistic Sep 24 '15 at 2:13

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