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This question already has an answer here:

I have this implementation of alloc, which allocates memory as a dynamic array.

My question is that what does it mean that the array and pointer are declared static? How does it affect to a function that calls alloc?

#define ALLOCSIZE 10000 /* size of available space */

static char allocbuf[ALLOCSIZE];   /* storage for alloc */
static char *allocp = allocbuf;    /* next free position */

char *alloc(int n)   /* return pointer to n characters */
{

    if (allocbuf + ALLOCSIZE - allocp >= n) {  /* it fits */
        allocp += n;
        return allocp - n; /* old p */
    }  else               /* not enough room */
        return 0;
}

marked as duplicate by giorgi moniava, Eugene Sh., Barmar c Sep 23 '15 at 20:28

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  • 1
    "I have this implementation of alloc, which allocates memory as a dynamic array". There doesn't appear to be be any dynamic arrays in your code. – kaylum Sep 23 '15 at 20:25
  • @AlanAu define dynamic – ouah Sep 23 '15 at 20:38
  • You should not use 0 as null pointer constant. Instead use the NULL macro. Note that even C++ learned this lesson, favouring nullptr. – too honest for this site Sep 23 '15 at 20:46
1

My question is that what does it mean that the array and pointer are declared static?

It means the lifetime of the arrays is the entire execution of the program. Any object defined at file-scope (with or without the static specifier) has static storage duration (exception: objects defined with C11 _Thread_local specifier). Adding the static specifier limits the visibility of the objects to the source file they are defined.

The total size of your alloc allocations is limited by the size of your allocbuf array.

  • So adding the static specifier only limits the visibility of the objects to the source file? – user 004325 Sep 23 '15 at 20:39
  • @user004325 yes, for objects defined at file-scope, adding static (versus no storage specifier) makes the objects private to the translation unit. – ouah Sep 23 '15 at 20:40
  • What does this mean in practice? – user 004325 Sep 23 '15 at 20:51
  • @user004325 that you cannot access allocbuf array directly from another source file, which is the purpose of adding static here. allocbuf presence is an implementation detail that is hidden for the alloc user. – ouah Sep 23 '15 at 20:57
  • Does alloc do dynamic memory allocation? – user 004325 Sep 24 '15 at 16:58

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