5

According to documentation, /proc/sys/fs/mqueue/msg_max can be used in order to increase the limit of messages in the queue. The documentation also says, that the limit should not exceed HARD_MSGMAX, which is 65,536 since Linux 3.5.

However, trying to open queue even with 500 elements fails with EMFILE:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <mqueue.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stddef.h>
#include <sys/stat.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    int message_size = argc > 1 ? atoi(argv[1]) : 16;
    int queue_size = argc > 2 ? atoi(argv[2]) : 10000;

    printf("Trying to open queue with msgsize: %d, and maxmsg: %d\n", message_size, queue_size);

    struct mq_attr initial_attributes = (struct mq_attr){
            .mq_msgsize = message_size,
            .mq_maxmsg = queue_size
    }; 

    int open_flags = O_RDWR | O_CREAT | O_EXCL;
    int permissions = S_IWUSR | S_IRUSR;

    const char* name = "/message_queue_name;";
    mqd_t queue = mq_open(name, open_flags, permissions, &initial_attributes);

    if(queue == -1)
    {
        printf("Cannot open message queue\n");
        printf("Errno: %d [%s]\n", errno, strerror(errno));
        return 1;
    }
    else
    {
        printf("Queue has been opened successfully. Closing...\n");
        mq_close(queue);
        mq_unlink(name);
    }

    return 0;
}

Tests:

$ cat /proc/sys/fs/mqueue/msg_max
65536

$ ./main 16 300
Trying to open queue with msgsize: 16, and maxmsg: 300
Queue has been opened successfully. Closing...

$ ./main 16 500
Trying to open queue with msgsize: 16, and maxmsg: 500
Cannot open message queue
Errno: 24 [Too many open files]

According to documentation, EMFILE error code means, that process already has the maximum number of files and message queues open, though this program does not open any other files.

So, my question is: how to open message queue with huge number of elements?


UPD [1]

This is my system limits:

$ ulimit -a
-t: cpu time (seconds)              unlimited
-f: file size (blocks)              unlimited
-d: data seg size (kbytes)          unlimited
-s: stack size (kbytes)             8192
-c: core file size (blocks)         0
-m: resident set size (kbytes)      unlimited
-u: processes                       62820
-n: file descriptors                1024
-l: locked-in-memory size (kbytes)  unlimited
-v: address space (kbytes)          unlimited
-x: file locks                      unlimited
-i: pending signals                 62820
-q: bytes in POSIX msg queues       819200
-e: max nice                        30
-r: max rt priority                 99
-N 15:                              unlimited
  • Any reason for downvote? – awesoon Sep 24 '15 at 8:48
  • Some other restriction? e.g. check ulimit -a – Karoly Horvath Sep 24 '15 at 8:54
  • @KarolyHorvath, hmm. ulimit -q (which is "bytes in POSIX msg queues") is 819200, so, I should be able to store about 50k 16-byte messages in a queue. I don't see any other limits - they are either unlimited or huge enough. – awesoon Sep 24 '15 at 9:12
  • BTW, return -1 from main() is an error. – gavv Sep 24 '15 at 12:50
  • @g-v, fixed, thank you again – awesoon Sep 24 '15 at 12:53
7

You have encountered RLIMIT_MSGQUEUE limit, see mq_overview(7):

Resource limit

The RLIMIT_MSGQUEUE resource limit, which places a limit on the amount of space that can be consumed by all of the message queues belonging to a process's real user ID, is described in getrlimit(2).

Increase it before calling mq_open(), e.g. like this:

...
#include <sys/resource.h>

int main(int argc, char** argv)
{
    struct rlimit rlim;
    rlim.rlim_cur = RLIM_INFINITY;
    rlim.rlim_max = RLIM_INFINITY;

    if (setrlimit(RLIMIT_MSGQUEUE, &rlim) == -1) {
        perror("setrlimit");
        return 1;
    }

    ...

You need root privileges for that (or CAP_SYS_RESOURCE capability, I guess).


Linux kernel really returns EMFILE for this case, check it here:

if (u->mq_bytes + mq_bytes < u->mq_bytes ||
    u->mq_bytes + mq_bytes > rlimit(RLIMIT_MSGQUEUE)) {
        spin_unlock(&mq_lock);
        /* mqueue_evict_inode() releases info->messages */
        ret = -EMFILE;
        goto out_inode;
}

The reason for EMFILE here is probably that it's the most close error code from those specified in POSIX; EMFILE is the only error code that reflects reaching a per-process limitation.

POSIX doesn't specify a more precise error code for RLIMIT_MSGQUEUE because it is Linux-specific.

  • Awesome! Seems like this solves my problem entirely. Thank you a lot! – awesoon Sep 24 '15 at 12:46
1

Looks like you are running out of file-descriptors. Just check the maximum number of file descriptors for each process (ulimit), if it's low then you can increase it to fulfill your needs by using

ulimit -n new_maximim_number
  • Does not work, unfortunately. I have 1024 file descriptors per process, and even increasing it to 4096 does not solve the problem. I'll add the ulimit -a output to the question in a second. Thank you for the answer, though – awesoon Sep 24 '15 at 9:25
  • Did you check when your program works how many file-descriptors actually it opens? ... for example when you launch it with 300. This is just to check if each message queue opens 1 file descriptor or much more. – rkachach Sep 24 '15 at 9:27
  • An other limitation may be the memory: – rkachach Sep 24 '15 at 9:28
  • Just checked - each message queue opens exactly one file descriptor. – awesoon Sep 24 '15 at 9:33
  • Do you mean, how much RAM is available? I have about 4GB free memory, so, it should not be a problem. – awesoon Sep 24 '15 at 9:34

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