30

Here is a fun issue I'm running into after updating to Swift 2.0

The error is on the if let url = URL.absoluteString line

func myFormatCompanyMessageText(attributedString: NSMutableAttributedString) -> NSMutableAttributedString
{
    // Define text font
    attributedString.addAttribute(NSFontAttributeName, value: UIFont(name: "Montserrat-Light", size: 17)!, range: NSMakeRange(0, attributedString.length))

    return attributedString
}

func textView(textView: UITextView, shouldInteractWithURL URL: NSURL, inRange characterRange: NSRange) -> Bool {
    if let url = URL.absoluteString {
        if #available(iOS 8.0, *) {
            VPMainViewController.showCompanyMessageWebView(url)
        }
    }
    return false
}
  • Did you lookup the documentation for the absoluteString method? Does it return an optional?? – Martin R Sep 24 '15 at 18:21
  • Just looked it up. No it doesn't return an optional, but relativeString is – mosaic6 Sep 24 '15 at 18:27
49

The compiler is telling you that you can't use an if let because it's totally unnecessary. You don't have any optionals to unwrap: URL is not optional, and the absoluteString property isn't optional either. if let is used exclusively to unwrap optionals. If you want to create a new constant named url, just do it:

func textView(textView: UITextView, shouldInteractWithURL URL: NSURL, inRange characterRange: NSRange) -> Bool {
    let url = URL.absoluteString
    if #available(iOS 8.0, *) {
        VPMainViewController.showCompanyMessageWebView(url)
    }
    return false
}

However, sidenote: having a parameter named URL and a local constant named url is mighty confusing. You might be better off like this:

func textView(textView: UITextView, shouldInteractWithURL URL: NSURL, inRange characterRange: NSRange) -> Bool {
    if #available(iOS 8.0, *) {
        VPMainViewController.showCompanyMessageWebView(URL.absoluteString)
    }
    return false
}
  • can we use guard here? – iPhone 7 Aug 31 '17 at 12:25
  • @iPhone6 No, for the same reason you can't use if let: because URL.absoluteString always succeeds. There's nothing to guard against--absoluteString is non-optional and will never be nil. – andyvn22 Aug 31 '17 at 15:41
0

absoluteString isn't an optional value, its just a String. You can check if the URL variable is nil

if let url = yourURLVariable {
    // do your textView function
} else {
    // handle nil url
}
  • URL: NSURL is not an optional, it cannot be nil. – Martin R Sep 24 '15 at 18:26
  • That's meant to be outside his textView function, will edit for clarity – Chris Slowik Sep 24 '15 at 18:28

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